0

GUT HEALTH – EFFECTS OF GLYPHOSATE AND ANTIBIOTICS

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD leaky gut glyphosateFred Liers PhD leaky gut glyphosateWe recently added a category of products for Gut Health to the HPDI foundational supplements program. We did this not only because there is a documented increase in gut-related health issues, but also because we hear about gut health issues from our clients and resellers. They desire effective means for solving the gut health problems prevalent today.

One of the biggest gut health problems we see today is leaky gut syndrome. The syndrome goes by other names and encompasses various symptoms. These symptoms broadly encompass food allergies, sensitivities, and intolerances.

Yet, the symptoms can also include low energy, fatigue, immune disorders, as well as obesity and blood sugar issues. It also encompasses celiac disease and certain brain disorders.

In fact, most of these gut-related conditions and symptoms today go beyond what was historically meant by “leaky gut syndrome.” Today leaky gut and the conditions associated with it largely seem to relate to a combination of factors, including modern agricultural methods, use of antibiotics and certain other pharmaceuticals, and toxic chemicals in foods and the environment.

glyphosate herbicide spray

Studies show the herbicide glyphosate adversely impacts gut health.

TOXIC INDUSTRIAL AGRICULTURE

Agriculture was not so long ago an organic affair. Chemical fertilizers were unknown, soils were healthier, and crops were at least non-GMO.

Things got worse with the introduction of chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides. The green revolution of the 1960s brought more changes, including the rise of monoculture crops and more dependence on chemicals.

Chemicals used in agriculture destroy soil microbes. These chemicals induce plant growth without simultaneously improving the quality of the soil. Consequently, the result is depletion of nutrients in soils. This has been proven by measurable declines in vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients in food crops.

When soils are continuously depleted and are nutrients are not replaced or augmented (as in Biodynamic agriculture, for example), soils have fewer nutrients. Eventually crops grown in these soils will be nutrient-poor and therefore not optimal for health. Nutrient declines in soils are significant, and soils continue to be depleted of nutrients.

The combination of chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides has created an unsustainable system of agriculture that does not produce nutritious food crops. Herbicides such as 2,4-D and atrazine, and pesticides like DDT (which remains in soils) are examples of chemicals that can significantly harm human and environmental health.

The introduction of genetically modified (GMO) crops has accelerated the negative effects of industrialized farming methods. This is especially true in terms of the lowering soil-quality and adversely impacting soil microbes, reducing nutrient levels in crops, and both directly and indirectly harming human health.

GMO crops have not been properly tested for safety. The dangers of GMO crops are significant. Bt corn is a crop whose genetic modification is associated directly with gut health issues (see charts below). Bt corn was created to damage the intestines of insects, but that also damages the health of the human gut.

When combined with specialized herbicides designed for use on GMO crops, the dangers of GMOs increase significantly. The primary herbicide used for GMO crops is glyphosate, which is a mineral chelator, endocrine disruptor, and biocide with antibiotic effects that kill bacteria (beneficial and harmful) indiscriminately leading to an imbalanced human microbiome.

Glyphosate appears to be associated with an increasing number of adverse health conditions partly because many health problems can be caused or exacerbated by nutrient deficiencies, endocrine disruption, microbiome imbalances, and other toxic effects. These health conditions include leaky gut syndrome which not only may result from an imbalanced microbiome, but also from a loosening of the necessarily tight junctions in the gut wall that protect us from exposure to foreign proteins not unlike the blood-brain barrier protects our brain.

TOXIC GLYPHOSATE

Use of the herbicide glyphosate has increased dramatically in recent years. Glyphosate is the primary (but by no means the only) ingredient in the herbicide RoundUp.

Glyphosate kills plants including weeds, and it does this partly by acting as a mineral chelator that prevents the uptake of nutrients by plants. This starves the plant until it dies. However, plants genetically modified to withstand glyphosate still contain fewer nutrients and are therefore less nutritious.

Moreover, any glyphosate you consume acts as a chelator in your body that  blocks your uptake of minerals and nutrients. This will not be good, especially if the GMO foods you consume are already nutrient deficient. Glyphosate also interferes with how you uptake and process nutrients (like manganese) in ways that guarantee depletion in the body, as will be discussed further below).

gmo crops glyphosate

Source: N. L. Swanson, “Genetically Modified Organisms and the Deterioration of Health in the United States” (2013)

A major reason for increasingly larger applications of glyphosate on crops is the rise of glyphosate-resistant “super weeds.” This was not predicted to happen, but clearly it is happening. Thus, the “solution” to the development of super weeds has been simply to apply more glyphosate. This means greater amounts of poison in crops, and of course, greater profits for the herbicide company.

The problem is that glyphosate is extremely toxic. If there were a perfect storm scenario for herbicide use, then glyphosate would be one component of it. Many scientists are concerned about it, including former genetic engineers like Thierry Vrain, who now advocates growing and consuming organic foods (see more below).

Increased use of glyphosate will in turn accelerate the rise of super-resistant weeds, and accelerate damage to the health of those who consume it.

Not to mention the unknown health risks of the genetically modified (GMO) crops themselves, which are sprayed with glyphosate. How would you be able to tell which is more damaging to health, the toxins embedded in GMO crops or the sprays that soak both GMO and non-GMO crops alike. None have been properly tested, or test results are hidden or suppressed.

Beyond all this, non-GMO crops like wheat, oats, barley, beans, and nuts are routinely sprayed with glyphosate at the end of the season as a means to dry these crops to make harvesting easier. So much for trying to eat verified non-GMO.

You’re likely getting a lot of glyphosate in your diet…unless you eat 100% organically grown foods that are not contaminated with glyphosate by direct spraying, spraying for the purposes of drying, or from drift related to nearby spraying.

And with increased levels of spraying to apply more of this herbicide, the likelihood is you’re getting glyphosate not only from foods, but also from a contaminated water supply (wells, rivers, streams), and from rainfall (with more than 65% of rain samples testing positive).

GLYPHOSATE ADVERSELY IMPACTS HEALTH

A noteworthy article on the topic of glyphosate and genetically modified organisms (GMO) is N.L.  Swanson’s “Genetically Modified Organisms and the Deterioration of Health in the United States” (2013). This was originally published as a series of articles on the Seattle Examiner website.

Scientists may disagree on the level of veracity of the article, and quibble over the finer points of statistical correlation. Meanwhile, people are getting sicker, not healthier. And that is the point.

If indeed glyphosate is impacting human health adversely at even a fraction of the levels argued by Swanson, then individuals should reduce their consumption of GMO foods as much as possible to avoid health consequences.

Foods containing GMOs should be clearly labeled, like they are in many other countries. Consumers have a right to know if foods contain GMO. There is no valid objection to labeling since many other (and far less harmful) ingredients in foods are labeled. This is a transparency issue. It is the least consumers deserve.

In July 2016, the US enacted the so-called DARK Act, which requires labels for GMO products. However, this law is far weaker than the Vermont law that preceded it. The US law preempts state laws. It represents a poor attempt to address consumers’ desire for labeling of GMO foods. It offers no standard labeling requirements, nor any means to enforce compliance for companies that fail to label. And while some may consider the US law progress for consumers, consider that in Europe GMO labeling went into effect back in 1997 – nearly 20 years ago.

In addition, proper scientific testing of the health effects of GMOs and in particular the herbicide glyphosate, as well as the adjuvants and surfactants contained in glyphosate-containing products—and how these ingredients act synergistically—must be carried out. Consumers should never be guinea pigs when science is available that can protect them and help them make informed decisions.

Not unlike tobacco companies that suppressed and downplayed the harm of their products, today’s purveyors of agricultural chemicals (and especially GMOs and glyphosate) are not particularly concerned about the adverse health effects of their products. In fact, it appears to be just the opposite, as studies indicating harmful effects frequently have been suppressed.

Several of the studies used to indicate safety of GMOs were short-term studies (three months) conducted by companies who make and sell the products themselves without peer review or release of data. Whereas longer-term, independent studies indicate probable harm to health, therefore showing the precautionary principle was disregarded in approving GMOs for human consumption.

In order for consumer to protect themselves, GMO labeling is a minimum measure. Most nations already require clear labeling or ban GMOs.

AVOID ANTIBIOTICS IN FOODS AND ELSEWHERE

The use of antibiotics in livestock results in a tainted food supply. This means that foods ingested contain antibiotics that damage and destroy beneficial microbes in the human gut. This contributes to reduced microbiome diversity and paves the way for a takeover by harmful bacteria.

Then there is the overuse of antibiotics in human medicine. The use of antibiotics significantly damages microbiome health and diversity. The importance of the microbiome for human health is such that antibiotic use that kills beneficial bacteria and imbalances the gut flora is proven to reduce overall health and can contribute to major health problems throughout life. This is especially true when antibiotics are used in childhood when the microbiome is establishing itself.

Glyphosate is not considered an antibiotic per se, but it exerts antibiotic-like effects. That is, glyphosate destroys microbes by acting on the Shikimate pathway, and therefore acts like an antibiotic. This pathway is not present in human beings, but is present in plants and most microbes important for the health of the human gut.

Glyphosate interferes with the synthesis by gut bacteria of aromatic amino acids (including tyrosine and tryptophan) as well as methionine. This leads to shortages in critical neurotransmitters such as serotonin and melatonin as well as folate.

There is evidence to show that glyphosate produces resistance to antibiotic drugs, just as overuse of antibiotics themselves contributes to the increase of so-called “superbugs,” or bacteria resistant to most or all antibiotics. This fact is another reason glyphosate contributes to the health problems relating to antibiotic use and to gut health issues, in particular.

The overuse of antibiotics both in humans and animals is an ongoing problem with many authorities calling for a reduction in use so that antibiotics are not rendered useless by the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.

Current policies regarding antibiotics virtually guarantee that not only will microbiome health be harmed by the consumption of antibiotic tainted foods and by the use of antibiotics too easily prescribed, but also that harmful bacteria will become stronger rendering antibiotics less useful in applications where they are truly needed.

An interesting fact in this regard is that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacteria, is a major problem in hospitals today due to its resistance to multiple antibiotics. It is one of only three bacterial species that can break down glyphosate. However, it produces formaldehyde as a by-product. Formaldehyde is a well-established neurotoxin. It is likely that the growth of this harmful bacteria is stimulated by the presence of glyphosate in the gut.

Avoidance of antibiotics in foods and when not medically necessary are ways individuals can help keep themselves healthy.

ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION

While this article deals primarily with the topic of gut or gastrointestinal health, it is noteworthy that glyphosate is considered to be an endocrine disruptor.

Endocrine disruption is associated with birth defects, reproductive problems (like infertility), breast cancer, and developmental problems in babies and children before and after birth, as well as a host of other health effects.

Endocrine disruptors are common in the environment, and we have written about them in previous posts. Glyphosate’s role as an endocrine disruptor is important not only because it is another harmful element among its many dangers, but also simply because of its ubiquitousness in the environment.

The amount of glyphosate spray in the US and the world in extraordinary. As weeds have become resistant to glyphosate (leading  to the rise of super weeds), the solution has been to spray more of it. Therefore, the amounts to which individuals are exposed have skyrocketed along with the increase in its application on crops and elsewhere.

Also, as noted, the practice of spraying glyphosate as a desiccating agent on non-GMO crops (such as wheat, oats, sugar cane, and peanuts) contributes significantly to human exposure. So too does “household” use in gardens and use by municipalities for spraying to decrease “weeds” in public places, such as parks and schools.

NUTRIENTS, HORMONES, AND NEUROTRANSMITTERS DISRUPTED BY GLYPHOSATE

Dr. Stephanie Seneff is a leading researcher in the area of the harmful effects of glyphosate. The following YouTube presentation by Dr. Seneff and Dr. Sachin Patel (interviewer) provides a wealth of information for the reader and is highly recommended: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpoGUPwe40c

In Dr. Seneff’s presentations she has pointed out that the following nutrients, hormones, and neurotransmitters are disrupted by glyphosate:

  1. Folate, Vitamin K, Vitamin A, Vitamin D, and cobalamin (Vitamin B12).
  2. Aromatic amino acids and methionine
  3. Iron, manganese, cobalt, selenium, zinc, and sulfur
  4. Serotonin, melatonin, dopamine, epinephrine
  5. Melanin (skin tanning agent), thyroid hormone
  6. NAD, glutathione (key antioxidant defenses)

Clearly it would be wise to take in foods and nutritional supplements that could replete the body with these  substances.

In order to compensate for these effects of glyphosate Dr. Seneff recommends the following supplements:

  1. Curcumin (see HPDI CURCUMIN C3 COMPLEX)
  2. Garlic
  3. Vitamin C (see HPDI PRO-C™ and Ultimate Protector™)
  4. Probiotics (see Prescript-Assist™)
  5. L-5-Methytetrahydrofolate (see HPDI 5-MTHF)
  6. Vitamin B-12 (see HPDI Methylcobalamin)
  7. Glutathione (contained in HPDI GLU-NAC Plus)
  8. Taurine (contained in HPDI Hepa Plus)

GLYPHOSATE DISRUPTS PROTEINS AND ENZYMES RELYING ON GLYCINE

Recently, Dr. Seneff and collaborators have identified the fact that glyphosate – a glycine amino acid based molecule – can disrupt a large number of enzymes in the body by inserting itself into proteins during the synthesis process where glycine would normally be inserted. When this happens, the function of the enzyme is completely negated. For further details see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=snNRfAfSeUk

LEAKY GUT AND BT TOXINS

Another class of worrisome genetically modified crops are Bt corn and other Bt crops (cotton, potato, and soy). Note that there are also glyphosate tolerant/resistant strains of corn (maize), so all types of GMO corn are potentially hazardous to health.

Bt corn is a variant of maize genetically altered to express proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Thousands of different Bt strains exist that produce proteins toxic to insect pests. Particular strains are chosen to target specific plant pests, such at the European Corn Borer (ECB).

 When an insect consumes Bt-containing plant tissues, one or more Bt proteins become activated in its gut, creating toxins that paralyze its digestive system and form holes in its gut wall.

Bt toxins bind to receptors in the insect’s gut. This causes the  gut wall to break down and allows toxins, as well as normal gut bacteria to enter the insect’s body. Toxins and bacteria proliferate in the insect’s body causing death. Notably, many insects have developed resistance to glyphosate, just as have weeds.

It has been noted by commentators that the human digestive system appears to be damaged in a similar way by proteins in Bt corn. In any event, as the number of acres planted with Bt corn increases, it appears that human digestive disorders also increase.

irritable bowel syndrome gut health bt corn

Source: N. L. Swanson, “Genetically Modified Organisms and the Deterioration of Health in the United States” (2013)

Disorders of the digestive system associated with Bt toxins not only include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and constipation, but also Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

inflammatory bowel disease crohn colitis gut bt corn

Source: N. L. Swanson, “Genetically Modified Organisms and the Deterioration of Health in the United States” (2013)

While the effects of the Bt toxin are different than those of glyphosate and other chemicals in glyphosate-containing crop chemicals, the fact is that evidence shows that the Bt toxins appear to adversely impact gut health.

KEY TAKEAWAY: CONSUME 100% ORGANIC DIET

Among key takeaways from examining the literature of problems associated with antibiotic use, as well as with the chemicals associated with modern agriculture and genetically modified foods (i.e., glyphosate and other herbicides, pesticides, and various surfactants and adjuvants used with them): Choose to eat organic foods as much as possible for best health.

Only by consuming organic foods can individually significantly reduce the amount of glyphosate, pesticides, antibiotics, and other harmful chemicals in the diet to support good health in general, and gut health in particular. Organic foods are also more nutrient dense, and therefore more nutritious.

After it is understood how current industrial agricultural methods contribute to damaging human health, then organic foods can be seen as a solution helping ensure avoidance of most or many of harmful elements in foods.

Organically grown foods may be tainted by drift or by toxins in the soil existing before the adoption of organic farming methods. Yet, the amounts of such toxins will be significantly reduced overall by consuming organic foods. The longer-term solution is adoption of organic methods (and corresponding reductions in use of chemicals and GMOs in agriculture) that will result in a cleaner, safer food supply for all.

Some say that organic foods are no better, or cost too much, or do not improve health. But the truth is that they are better, should not cost more, and are far more sustainable for human and planetary health. In fact, at this point in time, consuming organic foods may be the only practical solution for avoiding health problems, especially gut-health problems, associated with industrialized, chemically based agricultural methods.

Growing food yourself is another option, as is purchasing organic or locally grown organically grown produce at your Farmer’s Market. These foods will not be sprayed with toxins and will not suffer the same level of nutrient declines found in conventional produce. Having even a relatively small garden at home will allow you to supplement organic foods you obtain locally. Some neighborhoods support community gardens where you can grow foods organically.

Between consuming foods you grow, purchasing organic or non-sprayed produce locally and/or at natural foods stores, emphasizing grass-fed, free-range animal products (e.g., eggs and meats), and reducing meals at restaurants that serve conventional foods (as well as ordering organic and non-GMO foods whenever possible), you can largely bypass or reduce the toxicity and gut-health issues associated with the toxins and GMOs in foods sold in grocery stores and ubiquitous in our food distribution system.

A 100% organic diet is recommend, entirely possible, and at the very least a worthy goal. It will pay dividends in terms of good health and how you feel.

Others recommend to detoxify from glyphosate by consuming an organic diet.

AVOID WHEAT, GLUTEN, AND SIMPLE CARBS

Wheat stands out as a singular food to avoid. It been hybridized beyond all recognition with many genes being added because wheat genes are additive. The wheat protein gluten has been linked to many types of health problems.

Gluten has long been a problem for gut health. Now with glyphosate being sprayed directly on wheat crops (as well as oats, sugar cane, and peanuts) as a desiccating agent, it seems that opening tight junctions in the gut and then having exposure to gluten is a prescription for disaster.

glyphosate wheat leaky gut intestinal infection

Glyphosate increasingly is sprayed on wheat (a non-GMO crop) for drying before harvest. How does poisoning wheat this way make sense?

Some commentators (like Wheat Belly author William Davis, MD) show that gluten is linked with obesity, diabetes, celiac disease, and many others.

Avoidance of wheat, gluten, and other simple carbohydrates is a good idea if you would maintain and retain good gut health.

celiac glyphosate wheat goo

Celiac disease has significantly increased with the practice of spraying glyphosate on wheat.

HEALTH EFFECTS LINKED TO GLYPHOSATE

In the article “Glyphosate’s Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: Pathways to Modern Diseases,” Stephanie Seneff and Anthony Samsel state that there are many pathologies to which glyphosate may contribute:

“The pathologies to which glyphosate could plausibly contribute, through its known biosemiotic effects, include inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, depression, ADHD, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS, multiple sclerosis, cancer, cachexia, infertility, and developmental malformations.” (Entropy 201315(4), 1416-1463; doi:10.3390/e15041416)

SUMMARY

Industrial agriculture, including the practices associated with the cultivation of GMO crops, harms the soils and human health.

Dangers to human health from industrial agriculture and GMOs includes harm to gastrointestinal health. This encompasses many conditions, including Leaky Gut Syndrome.

Leaky gut does not always result from a single cause, but can involve multiple factors, including exposure to glyphosate (and its adjuvants), Bt toxins, depleted nutrient levels, wheat and wheat protein (gluten/gliadin) exposure, microbiome imbalances or disruption, antibiotic use or consuming foods containing antibiotics, other chemical exposures, and additional factors.

Ways to avoid leaky gut: 1) Consume a 100% organic diet, 2) Avoid GMOs, 3) Avoid antibiotics, 4) Maintain a healthy microbiome, 5) Avoid wheat and simple carbohydrates (and simple sugars), 6) Improve nutrient levels through diet and dietary supplements, 7) Use specific supplements that help restore and maintain gut health 7) Detoxify on a regular basis using juices, herbs, and other practices.

We will continue writing articles for blog series on the topic of gut health. In coming months, we will write about various means for improving gastrointestinal structure and function. These means include restoring tight junctions in the gut using Restore (lignite formula).

 

SOURCES & RESOURCES

Center For Food Safety (CFS)

Institute for Responsible Technology (IRT)

The Detox Project (Glyphosate Portal)

ARTICLES & STUDIES

Glyphosate-based herbicides are toxic and endocrine disruptors in human cell lines

Genetically Modified Organisms and the Deterioration of Health in the United States“, N. L. Swanson, MIT

Glyphosate’s Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: Pathways to Modern Diseases

Plants have a microbiome just like humans — and it could transform how our food is produced

Understanding Glyphosate Toxicity: Interview with Genetic Engineer Thierry Vrain (Mother Earth News)

HPDI-RELATED ARTICLES

Gut Health – Intestinal Rejuvenation Formula

Amending the HPDI Foundational Supplement Program

Microbiome, Diet, and Prescript-Assist Probiotic and Prebiotic

Kidney Cleansing with Juices & Herbs

Liver Cleanse with Juices & Herbs

Rejuvenation Program: Part 2 (Detoxification)

Death by One (Or Two) Thousand Cuts

Dr. Mark Sircus’s blog article at www.DrSircus.com:
“Apples – Pectin – Intestinal Formula”

BOOKS

Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain for Life by Dr. David Perlmutter

Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar – Your Brain’s Silent Killers by Dr. David Perlmutter

Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health by Dr. William Davis

VIDEOS

PRODUCTS

INTESTINAL REJUVENATION FORMULA

PRESCRIPT-ASSIST™ Probiotic Formula (soil-based organisms)

RESTORE For Gut Health (lignite formula)

PROLYT
(proteolytic enzymes)

DIGASE
(full spectrum plant enzymes)

Nascent Iodine

Magnesium Oil, Flakes, Gel

0

EFFECTIVE PAIN RELIEF STRATEGIES WITH WARRIOR MIST

Fred Liers PhD warrior mist effective pain reliefI am excited this month to talk about Warrior Mist, which is an all-natural skin, muscle, and joint support formula. Warrior Mist is a topical formula that is my go-to-product for effective pain relief.

Warrior Mist is highly effective for pain. Indeed, my father Dr. Hank Liers formulated it for rapid pain relief, naturally. Many health care professionals find it useful for their clients.

Being applied topically on skin, Warrior Mist acts quickly at the pain source to stop it. Topical application is an advantage when it comes to rapid relief.

Warrior Mist topical effective pain relief

Warrior Mist comes in a pump-spray glass bottle.

NATURAL INGREDIENTS FOR EFFECTIVE PAIN RELIEF

Beyond its effectiveness against pain, what I like about Warrior Mist is that it contains all-natural ingredients. What does that mean? Most of its ingredients are herbal like peppermint oil, lavender oil, and organic coconut and olive oils.

Warrior Mist contains: DMSO (99.999% pure), peppermint oil (the source of menthol in the product), organic olive oil, distilled water, MSM, magnesium chloride, lemon oil, lavender oil, and organic coconut oil.

Warrior Mist contains no harsh chemicals or synthetic preservatives (like parabens, dimethicone, or phenoxyethanol). What else would you expect from a formulator like Dr. Hank Liers or a company like Health Products Distributors?

For anyone who cares about NOT putting toxic chemicals on their skin, Warrior Mist is a high-purity formula worthy of consideration. It is a pure, simple, and effective formula.

Warrior Mist comes in a spray bottle made of glass, not plastic. Shake it, then spray it. Gently massage the area of application to assist absorption. That’s all there is to it.

WARRIOR MIST APPLICATIONS FOR PAIN

Warrior Mist is effective for many applications, including pain relief for joints (wrists, elbows, knees, ankles), bruises and scratches, as well as insect bites and skin irritations. I occasionally I spray it directly into my mouth for throat relief, especially in winter or during allergy season (although technically it is not for internal use).

AIKIDO

I practice aikido, which can stress joints, especially wrists. Most aikido techniques involve grips that can become throws. There are also strikes, counterstrikes, blocks, falls, rolls, wrist breaks (escapes), and other movements.

Aikido is safe when practiced carefully. Yet, many techniques can lead to bumps, bruises, strains, sprains, and soreness. Warrior Mist helps me (and others) a lot. In fact, I donated a bottle of Warrior Mist to the dojo, so it’s there for anyone who needs it.

I am not sure what I would do for routine aches and pains without Warrior Mist. Sometimes just having relief after an aikido workout makes a big difference in my day.

My eight-year-old son also practices aikido in the same dojo. I feel confident using Warrior Mist on him because it is a safe, natural product that works.

I also practice yoga. Yoga rarely results in the types of minor injuries I experience from aikido. Yet, for times when I overstretch a muscle or overdo a pose, I reach for Warrior Mist for rapid, effective pain relief.

HIKING

I enjoy hiking. We live on the edge of a desert wilderness north of Tucson, Arizona. There are cactus, thick brush, thorny bushes, and biting insects like ants and scorpions. Many hikes involve at least a few thorns, scrapes, or mild soreness. Warrior Mist helps with these.

I have used Warrior Mist for bee and scorpion stings, ant bites, scrapes, cuts, small puncture wounds (e.g., from cactus spines), as well as skin irritations of various kinds.

In fact, there are few types of pain I have found Warrior Mist doesn’t mitigate. I use it for shoulder pain, neck pain, and lower back pain when it occurs. I notice the sooner I get Warrior Mist on the affected area, the faster I experience relief.

I don’t personally suffer from headaches, but friends who do tell me Warrior Mist helps them a lot. One of the ingredients is magnesium chloride, which is known to help ease headaches, including migraine headaches. Gently rub Warrior Mist around temples, forehead, or base of the neck.

Pain relief is not always immediate when using Warrior Mist. Yet, I know from experience how much it helps. The ingredients it contains support healing, too. Be patient, give it time, and allow it to work. That is exactly what I do sometimes.

AROUND HOUSE, YARD, AND GARDEN

Warrior Mist is ideal to keep in the house for everyday bumps and bruises like stubbed toes, bruised shins, or skinned knees. We find it useful after yardwork or gardening. You can spray it directly on an area, or else spray it into your hand first (after shaking the bottle), and then rub it into an affected area.

I know of two people who use Warrior Mist for pain in the tailbone (coccyx), the final segment of the vertebral column. Tailbone pain for them was originally caused by falling. One person fell from a horse and the other off a skateboard. While these injuries are structural, Warrior Mist provides significant relief. The reduction in pain helps daily function and facilitates sleep.

WARRIOR MIST FOR PETS

Warrior Mist is safe for use with pets. In fact, it was originally formulated for pets with the help of a veterinarian. You can feel confident using Warrior Mist on pets, large and small. It is ideal for use on dogs, cats, horses, and farm animals. Many veterinarians use Warrior Mist in their clinics for effective pain relief.

If you are a veterinarian, consider using Warrior Mist for your pet patients.

PROFESSIONAL USES

My wife Stefanie is a practicing acupuncturist. She uses and recommends Warrior Mist for her clients.

She frequently uses Warrior Mist in her practice for knee pain, shoulder pain, and back pain. What she often does is mix about five sprays (pumps) of Warrior Mist with about ten sprays of Magnesium Oil along with a dime-sized amount of carrier oil (like organic jojoba oil or coconut oil) in her palm.

She mixes the liquids in her palm (for amounts up to one tablespoon), but it can be mixed and stored a small container. For greater amounts, the ratios remain the same – about 2:1 Magnesium Oil to Warrior Mist – with correspondingly higher amounts of carrier oil. This is an excellent mixture because it combines the benefits of Warrior Mist and Magnesium Oil.

There is a slight chemical reaction that occurs when Warrior Mist mixes with Magnesium Oil. It is actually a warming effect. Stefanie likes it because the mixture is then applied warm, which relaxes muscles and opens pores for better absorption. No “warm up” is necessary and clients seem to appreciate the mixture’s warmth.

The mixture (of Warrior Mist, Magnesium Oil, and carrier oil) may be applied directly on affected areas with high rates of success. Clients themselves can obtain Warrior Mist and Magnesium Oil to make this mixture at home. Using a carrier oil is helpful, but not required because Warrior Mist contains organic coconut and olive oils.

Warrior Mist Magnesium Oil effective pain relief

Warrior Mist works well mixed with Ancient Minerals magnesium oil.

Stefanie also finds Warrior Mist useful for clients suffering from headaches. In addition, she will apply straight Warrior Mist to the throat, lymph nodes, or upper chest area for clients dealing with respiratory issues. Indeed, she applies it to these areas on herself when she feels she may be fighting or coming down with something.

Use Warrior Mist on clean, dry, lotion-free skin. The DMSO in the formula acts as a solvent carrying substances on skin into the body. This allows natural ingredients in the formula to penetrate into painful areas. Wash hands and the application area (or wipe with a damp cloth) before treatment. Avoid using carrier oils with toxic ingredients (like synthetic preservatives) that could be pulled into the body.

Stefanie tells her clients not to put anything on their skin that they would not eat. That is, use only natural oils and products containing ingredients that are natural and organic. A useful resource to determine what products are most natural is the Skin Deep Database on the Environmental Working Group website (www.ewg.org).

If you are a health care professional who deals with clients requiring pain relief, please contact HPDI to request a sample bottle of Warrior Mist. See how well this effective pain relief formula works for your clients.

Warrior Mist effective pain relief

Wash hands, shake bottle, then spray on clean, dry skin. Massage area to assist absorption.

WARRIOR MIST FOR ATHLETES AND SPORTS

One group of people who love Warrior Mist is athletes, especially runners, triathletes, and other endurance athletes. Warrior Mist is useful for nearly all sports, including contact sports.

HPDI’s sponsored athlete, pro cyclist Irena Ossola, uses Warrior Mist regularly, especially during races and high-intensity training. She incorporates it into the sports massage she receives with reportedly good effects. She also states that it helps her with recovery.

Irena occasionally crashes her bicycle. This remains a hazard in her sport, she says. However, Warrior Mist has done much to help her joints, road rash and other abrasions, sore muscles, and to speed her recovery.

For purposes of athletes, the magnesium chloride in Warrior Mist can help support muscle health and recovery, and provide effective pain relief.

WARRIOR MIST SUMMARY

Dr. Hank Liers designed Warrior Mist as a natural formula containing ingredients known for providing effective pain relief. Given its wide applicability, topical application, natural ingredients, and proven history of use, Warrior Mist is ideal for personal use by consumers and in clinical settings for clients who require effective pain relief.

Warrior Mist is one of the most natural, effective pain relief products available to heath care professionals and consumers alike.

Warrior Mist comes in a 30 ml (1 oz) spray bottle which provides hundreds of applications. A single bottle typically lasts about two months.

Directions: Shake bottle before applying. Wash hands before and after use. Apply in a thin layer to a clean, dry, and lotion-free area needing support. Shave thick hair that may prevent absorption by the skin. Gently massage the area of application to assist absorption. Re-apply as needed 3–4 times daily. (Contains DMSO, a known solvent.)

BEYOND WARRIOR MIST: WARRIOR SLEEP & WARRIOR ENERGY

Warrior Mist is one of three Warrior Health products offered by Health Products Distributors. Dr. Hank Liers formulated these Warrior products, all of which are topicals requiring ultra-low doses (ULD) by design: Warrior Mist, Warrior Sleep, and Warrior Energy.

Warrior Mist Sleep Roll-On Energy effective pain relief

Warrior Mist, Warrior Sleep, and Warrior Roll-On Energy are topical formulas.

Warrior Sleep (9 ml) is an effective, natural sleep and relaxation formula having no drug-like side effects (compared to conventional sleep aids). Like Warrior Mist, you apply Warrior Sleep directly to skin (transdermal application) for rapid absorption. Warrior Sleep incorporates four natural ingredients for sleep: lavender oil, roman chamomile, magnesium, and melatonin. It uses DMSO and natural oils to carry these rest promoters into the body. Warrior Sleep contains: DMSO (99.999% pure), olive oil, distilled water, MSM, magnesium oil, lavender oil, lecithin, roman chamomile oil, coconut oil, and melatonin.

Warrior Sleep

Warrior Sleep is an effective topical relaxation and sleep formula.

Warrior Roll-On Energy (9 ml) is a unique topical roll-on energy product. It is formulated to provide five hours of mental and physical enhancement. One bottle will last 30 days when used twice daily. Warrior Roll-On Energy contains: DMSO (99.999% pure), organic aloe vera gel (inner fillet), distilled water, organic extra virgin olive oil, peppermint oil, magnesium chloride with trace ocean minerals, MSM, organic coconut oil, caffeine (80% from green tea), soy lecithin (high phosphatide and 98% oil free), glutathione (reduced), Vitamin B6 (from pyridoxal-5’-phosphate), Vitamin B12 (as methylcobalamin), and Folinic Acid (from calcium folinate).

Warrior_Roll-On_Energy Warrior Sleep

Warrior Sleep and Warrior Roll-On Energy contain built-in roll-on applicators.

I use all three Warrior products depending on daily needs. Warrior Sleep is an effective sleep aid, but is also effective for relaxation or applied before bedtime to prepare for sleep. I apply to the neck base, upper throat, and temples. We have noticed it nourishes and smooths facial skin. This is due to its synergistic blend of ingredients, including melatonin, MSM, and organic carriers oils.

Warrior Roll-On Energy is uniquely energizing. It differs dramatically from most energy products, or coffee, tea, or chocolate. The formula utilizes ultra-low dose (ULD) technology to carry energizing ingredients (including caffeine from green tea) rapidly into the body. Yet, unlike caffeinated drinks, users typically experience no let down or rapid drop in energy after using it. Warrior Roll-On Energy provides non-jarring, sustained energy during the day (up to six hours).

Health Care Professionals: Please contact HPDI (1-800-228-4265) to request sample(s) of Warrior Mist, Warrior Sleep, Warrior Roll-On Energy, or other products in which you are interested.

RESOURCES

HPDI BLOG ARTICLES

Warrior Mist: Creating an Effective Pain Relief Formula

Super Remedies for Stings and Bites

PRODUCTS

Warrior Mist

Warrior Sleep

Warrior Roll-On Energy

Warrior Products

Magnesium Oil

CONTACT US:

You can reach HPDI by calling 1-800-228-4265, email support(at)IntegratedHealth.com, or visit the retail website: IntegratedHealth.com

Health care professionals and resellers can apply for wholesale account, which includes access to the HPDI reseller website: HealthProductsDistributors.com. Support(at)HealthProductsDistributors.com.

0

ULTIMATE PROTECTOR INGREDIENTS – STRAWBERRIES

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD biography about us HPDI integratedhealth formulator founder CEO scientist physicist strawberriesUltimate Protector™ contains freeze dried strawberries, as well as components from 29 different fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Each of these ingredients contain substances that may be considered to be polyphenols, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators. In this article I explore the ingredient strawberries, which is a component of VitaBerry Plus® from Futureceuticals.

VITABERRY PLUS®

VitaBerry® (N1023) is the trade name for a line of high ORAC blends of fruit powders and fruit extracts, exclusively available through FutureCeuticals.

VitaBerry® is a proprietary formula that combines wild bilberry and wild blueberry, cranberry, raspberry, strawberry, prune, cherry, and grape whole powders and extracts into lines of custom blends. High in fruit polyphenols, anthocyanins, proanthocyanins, ellagic acid, chlorogenic acid, resveratrol, and quinic acid, VitaBerry offers 6,000 ORAC units in a single gram.

VitaBerry® Plus (N81.3) combines the standard blend of VitaBerry® with resveratrol and quercetin to deliver a minimum of 12,000 ORAC units per gram.

Strawberry strawberries

HEALTH BENEFITS OF STRAWBERRIES

Strawberries long have grown wild in the world’s temperate regions. They have been cultivated for several thousand years and were prized among the ancient Romans. Most of the common varieties of strawberry derive from a hybrid (Frangaria x ananassa). Strawberries have an ORAC value of 1,540, which is very high among the fruits and vegetables tested by the USDA. They are a good source of vitamins C, K, B2, B5, B6, and folate. They also contain appreciable amounts of the minerals manganese, iodine, and potassium, as well as dietary fiber.

Like other berries, the antioxidants contained in strawberries may be useful against diseases of the heart and arteries by preventing the oxidation of lipids. The phytonutrient phenols most abundant in strawberries are anthocyanins and ellagitannins. The anthocyanins help to prevent oxidative damage from free radicals in body. The unique phenol profile of the strawberry enables it not only to protect the heart, but also to fight inflammation. Studies have shown that strawberries also protect the brain from oxidative stress and may therefore reduce age-related cognitive decline in brain function. Strawberries have been shown to be Nrf2 activators that can stimulate the endogenous production of protective enzymes in the body.

Here is a list of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory phytonutrients in found in strawberries.

  • Anthocyanins
    • cyanidins
    • pelargonidins
  • Flavonols
    • procyanidins
    • catechins
    • gallocatechins
    • epicatechins
    • kaempferol
    • quercetin
  • Hydroxy-benzoic acids
    • ellagic acid
    • gallic acid
    • vanillic acid*
    • salicylic acid
  • Hydroxy-cinnamic acids
    • cinnamic acid
    • coumaric acid
    • caffeic acid
    • ferulic acid
  • Tannins
    • ellagitannins
    • gallotannins
  • Stilbenes
    • resveratrol

For more information on strawberries visit: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=32

Scientific Studies on the Antioxidant Effects of Strawberries

Below, I provide relevant scientific studies on the antioxidant effects and potential health benefits of strawberries.

Strawberry as a functional food: an evidence-based review

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24345049

Abstract

Emerging research provides substantial evidence to classify strawberries as a functional food with several preventive and therapeutic health benefits. Strawberries, a rich source of phytochemicals (ellagic acid, anthocyanins, quercetin, and catechin) and vitamins (ascorbic acid and folic acid), have been highly ranked among dietary sources of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity. It should however be noted that these bioactive factors can be significantly affected by differences in strawberry cultivars, agricultural practices, storage, and processing methods: freezing versus dry heat has been associated with maximum retention of strawberry bioactives in several studies. Nutritional epidemiology shows inverse association between strawberry consumption and incidence of hypertension or serum C-reactive protein; controlled feeding studies have identified the ability of strawberries to attenuate high-fat diet induced postprandial oxidative stress and inflammation, or postprandial hyperglycemia, or hyperlipidemia in subjects with cardiovascular risk factors. Mechanistic studies have elucidated specific biochemical pathways that might confer these protective effects of strawberries: upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, downregulation of NF-kB activity and subsequent inflammation, or inhibitions of carbohydrate digestive enzymes. These health effects may be attributed to the synergistic effects of nutrients and phytochemicals in strawberries. Further studies are needed to define the optimal dose and duration of strawberry intake in affecting levels of biomarkers or pathways related to chronic diseases.

Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries

Abstract

Berries, especially members of several families, such as Rosaceae (strawberry, raspberry, blackberry), and Ericaceae (blueberry, cranberry), belong to the best dietary sources of bioactive compounds (BAC). They have delicious taste and flavor, have economic importance, and because of the antioxidant properties of BAC, they are of great interest also for nutritionists and food technologists due to the opportunity to use BAC as functional foods ingredients. The bioactive compounds in berries contain mainly phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, and tannins) and ascorbic acid. These compounds, either individually or combined, are responsible for various health benefits of berries, such as prevention of inflammation disorders, cardiovascular diseases, or protective effects to lower the risk of various cancers. In this review bioactive compounds of commonly consumed berries are described, as well as the factors influencing their antioxidant capacity and their health benefits.

Dietary intakes of berries and flavonoids in relation to cognitive decline

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22535616

Abstract

Objective: Berries are high in flavonoids, especially anthocyanidins, and improve cognition in experimental studies. We prospectively evaluated whether greater long-term intakes of berries and flavonoids are associated with slower rates of cognitive decline in older women.

Methods: Beginning in 1980, a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was administered every 4 years to Nurses’ Health Study participants. In 1995–2001, we began measuring cognitive function in 16,010 participants, aged ≥70 years; follow-up assessments were conducted twice, at 2-year intervals. To ascertain long-term diet, we averaged dietary variables from 1980 through the initial cognitive interview. Using multivariate-adjusted, mixed linear regression, we estimated mean differences in slopes of cognitive decline by long-term berry and flavonoid intakes.

Results: Greater intakes of blueberries and strawberries were associated with slower rates of cognitive decline (eg, for a global score averaging all 6 cognitive tests, for blueberries: p-trend = 0.014 and mean difference = 0.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.01–0.07, comparing extreme categories of intake; for strawberries: p-trend = 0.022 and mean difference = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.00–0.06, comparing extreme categories of intake), after adjusting for multiple potential confounders. These effect estimates were equivalent to those we found for approximately 1.5 to 2.5 years of age in our cohort, indicating that berry intake appears to delay cognitive aging by up to 2.5 years. Additionally, in further supporting evidence, greater intakes of anthocyanidins and total flavonoids were associated with slower rates of cognitive decline (p-trends = 0.015 and 0.053, respectively, for the global score).

Interpretation: Higher intake of flavonoids, particularly from berries, appears to reduce rates of cognitive decline in older adults.

Addition of strawberries to the usual diet decreases resting chemiluminescence of fasting blood in healthy subjects-possible health-promoting effect of these fruits consumption

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24912053

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Regular strawberry consumption augmented plasma antioxidant activity and decreased lipid peroxidation suggests preventive potential of these fruits against oxidative stress-dependent disorders. Blood phagocytes are important source of oxidants that may contribute to systemic oxidative stress. We examined the effect of strawberry consumption on the luminol enhanced whole blood chemiluminescence (LBCL) reflecting oxidants generation by circulating phagocytes in healthy subjects.

METHODS: Thirty-one healthy subjects (being on their usual diet) consumed 500 g of strawberry pulp daily (between 11.00-14.00) for 30 days (1st strawberry course) and after 10 day wash-out the cycle was repeated (2nd strawberry course). Fasting blood and spot morning urine samples were collected before and after each strawberry course for measuring resting and agonist (fMLP)-induced LBCL, various phenolics and plasma antioxidant activity. Twenty subjects served as a control in respect to LBCL changes over the study period.

RESULTS: Strawberry consumption decreased median resting LBCL and this effect was more evident after the 1st course (by 38.2%, p < 0.05) than after the the 2nd one (18.7%), while fMLP-induced LBCL was constant. No changes in LBCL were noted in controls. Strawberries increased fasting plasma levels of caffeic acid and homovanillic acid as well as urolithin A and 4-hydroxyhippuric acid in spot urine. Plasma antioxidant activity and the number of circulating phagocytes did not change over the study period. Resting LBCL correlated positively with the number of circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes at all occasions and negative correlation with plasma 4-hydroxyhippuric acid was noted especially after the first strawberry course (r = -0.46, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: The decrease in resting LBCL suggests that regular strawberry consumption may suppress baseline formation of oxidants by circulating phagocytes. This may decrease the risk of systemic imbalance between oxidants and anti-oxidants and be one of mechanisms of health-promoting effect of these fruits consumption.

Consumption of strawberries on a daily basis increases the non-urate 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of fasting plasma in healthy subjects

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25120279

Abstract

Strawberries contain anthocyanins and ellagitanins which have antioxidant properties. We determined whether the consumption of strawberries increase the plasma antioxidant activity measured as the ability to decompose 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) in healthy subjects. The study involved 10 volunteers (age 41 ± 6 years, body weight 74.4 ± 12.7 kg) that consumed 500 g of strawberries daily for 9 days and 7 matched controls. Fasting plasma and spot morning urine samples were collected at baseline, during fruit consumption and after a 6 day wash-out period. DPPH decomposition was measured in both deproteinized native plasma specimens and pretreated with uricase (non-urate plasma). Twelve phenolics were determined with HPLC. Strawberries had no effect on the antioxidant activity of native plasma and circulating phenolics. Non-urate plasma DPPH decomposition increased from 5.7 ± 0.6% to 6.6 ± 0.6%, 6.5 ± 1.0% and 6.3 ± 1.4% after 3, 6 and 9 days of supplementation, respectively. The wash-out period reversed this activity back to 5.7 ± 0.8% (p<0.01). Control subjects did not reveal any changes of plasma antioxidant activity. Significant increase in urinary urolithin A and 4-hydroxyhippuric (by 8.7- and 5.9-times after 6 days of supplementation with fruits) was noted. Strawberry consumption can increase the non-urate plasma antioxidant activity which, in turn, may decrease the risk of systemic oxidants overactivity.

One-month strawberry-rich anthocyanin supplementation ameliorates cardiovascular risk, oxidative stress markers and platelet activation in humans

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24406274

Abstract

Strawberries are an important fruit in the Mediterranean diet because of their high content of essential nutrients and beneficial phytochemicals, which seem to exert beneficial effects in human health. Healthy volunteers were supplemented daily with 500 g of strawberries for 1 month. Plasma lipid profile, circulating and cellular markers of antioxidant status, oxidative stress and platelet function were evaluated at baseline, after 30 days of strawberry consumption and 15 days after the end of the study. A high concentration of vitamin C and anthocyanins was found in the fruits. Strawberry consumption beneficially influenced the lipid profile by significantly reducing total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels (-8.78%, -13.72% and -20.80%, respectively; P<.05) compared with baseline period, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol remained unchanged. Strawberry supplementation also significant decreased serum malondialdehyde, urinary 8-OHdG and isoprostanes levels (-31.40%, -29.67%, -27.90%, respectively; P<.05). All the parameters returned to baseline values after the washout period. A significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity measured by both ferric reducing ability of plasma and oxygen radical absorbance capacity assays and vitamin C levels (+24.97%, +41.18%, +41.36%, respectively; P<.05) was observed after strawberry consumption. Moreover, the spontaneous and oxidative hemolysis were significant reduced (-31.7% and -39.03%, respectively; P<.05), compared to the baseline point, which remained stable after the washout period. Finally, strawberry intake significant decrease (P<.05) the number of activated platelets, compared to both baseline and washout values. Strawberries consumption improves plasma lipids profile, biomarkers of antioxidant status, antihemolytic defenses and platelet function in healthy subjects, encouraging further evaluation on a population with higher cardiovascular disease risk.

Impact of strawberries on human health: insight into marginally discussed bioactive compounds for the Mediterranean diet

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To review and update the current knowledge on the potential impact of strawberry on human health, with particular attention on compounds and indirect mechanisms of action not exhaustively considered.

DESIGN: Personal perspectives and recent data.

SETTING: International.

RESULTS: Our research group was among the few groups that have recently investigated the folate content in fresh, stored and processed strawberries, and the data look very promising. As well, some in vivo evidence of the impact of strawberry intake on the folate status in humans have already been reported, but a new increasing interest on this field is strongly hoped. Furthermore, the hypouricaemic effects previously ascribed to cherry consumption need to be evaluated in respect to strawberry intake. At the moment, inconsistent results come from the few investigations designed at this proposal. In our studies, a great interindividual variability was observed on plasma urate levels in response to strawberry intake, suggesting a putative effect.

CONCLUSIONS: The mechanisms responsible for the potential health-promoting effects of strawberry may not be necessarily searched in the activity of phytochemicals. Particularly, a greater interest should be addressed to show whether a prolonged strawberry consumption may effectively improve the folate status and reduce the incidence of folate-related pathological conditions. Furthermore, the hypouricaemic effects of cherries need to be evaluated also in respect to strawberry intake, and the mechanisms of actions and anti-gout potentialities need to be studied in detail. Future investigations involving human trials should be aimed at following these underestimated scientific tracks.

strawberry strawberries fruit

SUMMARY

Strawberries are an important fruit full of polyphenols, anthocyanins, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators that help to make Ultimate Protector such an outstanding nutritional supplement.

 

Contact Us:

You can reach HPDI by calling 1-800-228-4265, email support(at)IntegratedHealth.com, or visit the retail website: www.IntegratedHealth.com

Health care professionals and retailers can apply for wholesale account, which includes access to the HPDI reseller website: www.HealthProductsDistributors.com

0

Consuming Organic Produce Reduces Dietary Exposure to Organophosphate Pesticides

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD dietary supplementFred Liers PhD dietary supplement dshea

We at HPDI have long advocated consuming organic produce. There are many reasons for choosing organic over conventional produce, including greater nutritional value and avoidance of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

Another major reason for consuming organic produce is avoiding exposure to toxic pesticides, including organophosphate pesticides. Pesticide exposures can poison the body and weaken overall health. They especially can harm children, as well as disrupt normal development of unborn children.

Avoiding exposures to toxins (or preventing toxicity) is an important part of the HPDI Rejuvenation Program. It has become clear that consuming organic produce reduces pesticide exposures, and thereby helps reduce the body’s toxic load.

Consuming organic foods may not be sufficient to prevent toxicity or significant exposure to toxins given the fact that pesticides and other toxins are ubiquitous in the environment (air, water, and soil). Periodic juice cleansing for your liver or kidneys supports elimination of toxins from the body.

A recent study published in Environmental Health Perspectives (Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1408197) highlights the important role played by consuming organic produce in reducing exposure to organophosphate pesticides.

spray pesticides farm equipment conventional gmo

Consuming organic foods is important because increasing amounts of pesticides are sprayed on crops.

The study is titled, “Estimating Pesticide Exposure from Dietary Intake and Organic Food Choices: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).” Here we present a summary of the study published in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Estimating Pesticide Exposure from Dietary Intake and Organic Food Choices: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

 ABSTRACT

Background: Organophosphate pesticide (OP) exposure to the US population is dominated by dietary intake. The magnitude of exposure from diet depends partly upon personal decisions such as which foods to eat and whether to choose organic food. Most studies of OP exposure rely on urinary biomarkers, which are limited by short half-lives and often lack specificity to parent compounds. A reliable means of estimating long-term dietary exposure to individual OPs is needed to assess the potential relationship with adverse health effects.

Objectives: We assessed long-term dietary exposure to 14 OPs among 4,466 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and examined the influence of organic produce consumption on this exposure.

Methods: Individual-level exposure was estimated by combining information on typical intake of specific food items with average OP residue levels on those items. In an analysis restricted to a subset of participants who reported rarely or never eating organic produce (“conventional consumers”), we assessed urinary dialkylphosphate (DAP) levels across tertiles of estimated exposure (n=480). In a second analysis, we compared DAP levels across subgroups with differing self-reported organic produce consumption habits (n=240).

Results: Among conventional consumers, increasing tertile of estimated dietary OP exposure was associated with higher DAP concentrations (p<0.05). DAP concentrations were also significantly lower in groups reporting more frequent consumption of organic produce (p<0.02).

Conclusions: Long-term dietary exposure to OPs were estimated from dietary intake data, and estimates were consistent with DAP measurements. More frequent consumption of organic produce was associated with lower DAPs.

Citation: Curl CL, Beresford SA, Fenske RA, Fitzpatrick AL, Lu C, Nettleton JA, Kaufman JD. Estimating Pesticide Exposure from Dietary Intake and Organic Food Choices: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Environ Health Perspecthttp://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408197.

Read this scientific article on Environmental Health Perspectives website: http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1408197/

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO AVOID PESTICIDE EXPOSURE

Consuming organic foods not only means greater nutritional value and better taste, it also means you reduce exposure to toxins like organophosphate pesticides that can cause significantly harm.

More pesticides than ever are being applied, and more potent ones. This is due to a combination of factors, including the expansion of genetically modified (GMO) crops. In addition, the development of resistance to pesticides means more are used in order have the desired (i.e., toxic) effects.

Protect yourself from pesticide exposure by consuming more organic foods, and following other recommendations in the HPDI Rejuvenation Program.

0

AMARANTH REJUVENATE POWER SMOOTHIE & JUICE RECIPES

Stefanie Lischer-Liers LAc amaranth rejuvenate power smoothie

Summer is in full swing and so are many native plants that flourish with the Sonoran desert monsoon rains. Our yard is full of wild amaranth and purslane, two amazingly nutritious “weeds.”

With the desert in full bloom, it is relatively easy to consume local foods in season just by heading out the back door.

I’ve been making a smoothie every morning with a large handful of wild amaranth leaves. The purslane is so tasty that I’ve been grazing on it directly from the yard. But is is also delicious in smoothies, salads, and stir-fries, or put into foods like quesadillas or sandwiches.

Here is the recipe for my Amaranth Rejuvenate! Power Smoothie. I also include other recipe ideas for juicing amaranth, purslane, and prickly pear fruits.

AMARANTH REJUVENATE!™ POWER SMOOTHIE

INGREDIENTS

• 1 frozen or fresh Fig*
• Several chunks frozen Mango*
• Frozen or fresh Blueberries*
• 1 Cup plain organic Yogurt (Greek-style works nicely)
• 1–2 Scoops REJUVENATE! PLUS / Berries & Herbs / Original Greens
• 1 Teaspoon raw organic Cacao powder (optional)
• Organic rice/almond/hemp milk add to create to desired consistency
• 1–2 Handfuls wild Amaranth leaves, Purslane or other fresh greens like spinach, kale, etc.
• Sprig of fresh Mint (optional)

(*any frozen organic fruit can be substituted)

DIRECTIONS

Place in a large mason jar and blend with hand blender. Or use a regular blender. Serve and enjoy!!

smoothie rejuvenate amaranth

Step 1. Assemble ingredients for Amaranth Rejuvenate Power Smoothie.

amaranth rejuvenate power smoothie superfoods

Step 2. Place ingredients in blender or container for stick blender.

rejuvenate amaranth power smoothie drink

Step 3. Blend and enjoy!!

AMARANTH IS A NUTRITION POWERHOUSE

You may never have eaten amaranth, but chances are good it grows near you. There are more than 60 species of amaranth. Not only does it grow in temperate and tropical regions around the world, but also is cultivated widely as a leaf vegetable and for its seeds. The leaves, stems, and roots are consumed in East, Souththeast, and South Asia (including China and India), the Mediterranean, Africa, and the Americas.

The word amaranth derives from Greek “amarantos” meaning “unfading.” The Greek word in turn derives from an ancient Indian Sanskrit word meaning “immortal immortal.” That’s an illustrious etymological significance for a plant our culture often regards as a weed.

Amaranth historically holds importance as a staple food among Native American cultures. Known to the Aztecs as “huauhtli,” it constituted perhaps 80% of caloric consumption before the arrival of the Spanish in Mesoamerica.

Native American cultures consumed amaranth greens, but primarily used the seeds as a grain. Amaranth seed is considered a pseudograin (like quinoa) due to its flavor and cooking properties. It is gluten free, high in protein, and easy to prepare.

The Aztecs used amaranth extensively in their religious ceremonies, especially those dedicated to their sun god Huitzilopochtli. During ritual ceremonies, the Aztecs would create a statue of him made of amaranth grain. Pieces of this statue were distributed among the celebrants.

Amaranth summer smoothie recipe rejuvenate superfoods

Wild amaranth is available for the picking during summer months.

Amaranth smoothie rejuvenate superfoods purslane

Amaranth leaves are ideal for smoothies, salads, stir fries, or eaten directly from the plant.

The Spanish outlawed cultivation of amaranth (and chia seeds) thereby removing an important part of the Aztec diet. Notably, amaranth seed is high in lysine, an amino acid which is low in corn (another Aztec staple food) and therefore helped balance their diet.

Aztecs didn’t drink smoothies or juice greens. Yet, amaranth is back in cultivation in the Americas, and grows wild in yards (like ours) everywhere. Take a closer look at the weeds in your yard. You might just find breakfast, dinner, or a nutritious smoothie ingredient!!

PURSLANE

Purslane is a succulent that is tender, juicy, and slightly tangy or tart. There is plenty of it growing in our yard. In fact, it grows just about anywhere from meadows, forests and deserts to urban lots and sidewalk cracks. Consider yourself fortunate if this wild edible grows in your yard or neighborhood because its nutritional content is second to none.

purslane

Nutritious purslane is often considered a superfood.

Purslane is a rich source of antioxidants, essential fatty acids, dietary fiber, as well as vitamins and minerals. It provides more nutrients than almost any of the greens we typically consume today. Vitamins it contains include vitamin A, B1, B2, B3, B6, C, and E. Purslane also offers calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, manganese, phosphorous, and especially potassium.

Purslane not only provides a wide range of nutrients, but offers them in abundance. It is particularly high in vitamin E and contains six times more beta-carotene than spinach. The levels of essential fatty acids it provides are the highest among all leafy green vegetables.

Purslane makes an excellent addition to your smoothies and juices. It is also superb in salads, soups, or steamed.

PRICKLY PEAR FRUITS

Another desert monsoon delectable is the prickly pear fruit. Our family went out this weekend and harvested the ripest fruits and juiced them. The juice is sweet enough to drink by itself or even watered down a bit. (Note: use tongs to pull fruits from cactus paddles to avoid sharp spines and tiny glochids on the fruit surfaces.)

prickly pear fruit amaranth leaf juice smoothie rejuvenate superfoods

Ripe prickly pear fruits produce delicious juice for smoothies and power-up drinks.

I juiced the prickly pear fruit and amaranth plant separately, and then mixed them together. Drinking that juice is a real power boost!

The Hurom juicer (single augur) does much better with prickly pear fruit than the twin gear Green Star, which became quickly jammed with seeds.

Some people might like to add pineapple juice or lemon juice and maple syrup to concentrated amaranth juice. Note that for juicing purposes, the entire amaranth plant can be juiced (leaves, stalks and all).

Add a scoop of Rejuvenate! (original) superfood plus a dash of lemon juice and maple syrup to the amaranth and prickly pear juice for a real lift to your day!

prickly pear fruits smoothie amaranth juice rejuvenate superfoods

Prickly pear fruits ready for juicing.

PRICKLY PEAR REJUVENATE DRINK

INGREDIENTS

• 6–10 ounces Prickly Pear fruit juice (fresh is best)
• 1 scoops REJUVENATE! (Original Greens) superfood
• 1–2 ounces Amaranth juice (or to taste) (optional)
• Organic Lemon juice or Pineapple juice (to taste) (optional)
• Maple syrup (to taste) (optional) (grade B organic best)

DIRECTIONS

Juice the prickly pear fruits and amaranth leaves (separately or together). Mix together with Rejuvenate! original (or the Rejuvenate! superfood of your choice). Add lemon or pineapple juice and/or grade B organic maple syrup. Enjoy!

amaranth prickly pear juice smoothie rejuvenate superfoods

Amaranth and prickly pear juices provide a rainbow of antioxidant phytochemicals.

PRICKLY PEAR LEMONADE

We enjoy a delicious variant of the Prickly Pear Rejuvenate Drink we call “prickly pear lemonade.” Prickly Pear Lemonade is very refreshing and hydrating on warm summer days. It is delicious with maple syrup, chlorella, or Rejuvenate! superfoods.

INGREDIENTS

• 2 Ounces Lemon juice (fresh squeezed or bottled) (organic)
• 2–4 Ounces Prickly Pear fruit juice
• 6–8 Ounces fresh water
Rejuvenate! Superfoods (optional)
• Maple syrup (to taste) (grade B organic) (optional)
• Chia seeds (whole or ground) (optional)
• Ice (optional)
• Mint sprigs (optional)

(Recipe makes 10–14 ounces. Adjust ingredients to taste or when making larger quantities.)

DIRECTIONS

Fill glass or pitcher with fresh water. Add prickly pear juice, lemon juice, and maple syrup. Add Rejuvenate! superfoods, chlorella, chia seeds, mint sprigs, and/or ice, as desired.

prickly pear lemonade amaranth smoothie rejuvenate

Prickly pear lemonade refreshes, hydrates, and tastes great!!

The rains of summer bring a burst of life into the desert, including a wide variety of edible plants and their fruits. We are blessed that our yard and surrounding area provide such an abundance of fresh greens and prickly pear fruits. We will consume them in our smoothies and juices well into the fall.

RESOURCES

Nature’s Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Wild Edible Plants

The Forager’s Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Wild Edible Plants

Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods From Dirt To Plate

Backyard Foraging: 65 Familiar Plants You Didn’t Know You Could Eat

Free Food and Medicine Worldwide Edible Plant Guide

Why is Wild Purslane a Prized Superfood?

REJUVENATE! SUPERFOODS

Rejuvenate! PLUS

Rejuvenate! (original greens)

Rejuvenate! Berries & Herbs

Rejuvenate! Superfoods: Which One is Right for Me?

PHOTO GALLERY

amaranth rejuvenate power smoothie blender

A Kitchen Aid hand blender makes smoothies easy.

hurom juicer rejuvenate amaranth smoothie prickly pear juice purslane greens superfoods

The Hurom juicer is perfect for juicing greens and prickly pear fruits.

prickly pear amaranth juice smoothie power drinks foraging rejuvenate superfoods

Prickly pear fruits ripe for picking.

chickens wild amaranth greens foraging

Chickens love eating wild amaranth as much as people do.