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ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ BRUNSWICK LABS ORAC6.0 TEST REPORT

Dr. Hank Liers, PhDHPDI’s new product ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ is a next generation cell protection formula that simultaneously meets the needs for high levels of Vitamin C, full spectrum antioxidants* (high ORAC values), and protective enzyme activators (Nrf2 activators from plant-based polyphenols) in a single product. This potent combination of characteristics distinguishes the formula because no other single product available today offers such complete protection.

All three of ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+‘s components provide significant protection against the various types of free radicals that cause cellular damage in the body. In particular, the full spectrum of antioxidants derived from high ORAC fruits, vegetables, and herbs (as well as Vitamin C) provide extremely powerful exogenous sources of protection against oxidative stress. To obtain a quantitative measure of just how powerful these external sources are we have elected to conduct ORAC testing.

ORAC TESTS

ORAC (standing for “Oxygen Radical Absorption Capacity”) was developed by Brunswick Labs as an analytical tool for estimating the antioxidant capacity of substances. It is an in vitro test that was an important advancement in commercially available analysis of the peroxyl free-radical’s trapping ability of foods and ingredients. It has become a de facto standard in the natural products industry. However, the original ORAC method was considered to be just a starting point for comprehensive antioxidant analysis.

The fact is that there are a variety of “free radicals” that operate in humans — the most important of which are the primary radicals hydroxyl, peroxyl, peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, and superoxide anion. Brunswick Labs has reported that even though the peroxyl is the major free radical in the body, it represents no more than 27% of the total antioxidant potential of selected fruits and vegetables. In addition, the original ORAC method favors certain antioxidant substances over others (e.g., anthocyanins over carotenoids) due to the use of a single free radical source (peroxyl radical).

These radicals are formed, behave, and are defended against differently. They all contribute to: 1) a general condition called “oxidative stress,” or cellular damage, and 2) broad human health concerns caused, for example, by inflammation, and DNA and protein damage. They are each implicated in different health problems – from cardiovascular disease to macular degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease and to skin damage and aging. Below we provide a brief summary of these free radicals.

The Peroxyl Radical is very important in many biological systems, including lipid peroxidation, DNA cleavage, and protein backbone modification. Hydroxyl is highly reactive and cannot be eliminated by our endogenous enzymes (such as SOD and glutathione). It can damage virtually all types of macromolecules: carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and amino acids. In the skin, hydroxyl radicals are created by UV exposure. Peroxynitrite is a reactive nitrogen species that is particularly harmful to proteins. It has been implicated in the development of certain cancers, hepatitis, and chronic inflammation. In the skin, peroxynitrite contributes to the breakdown of vital proteins, such as collagen.

Singlet Oxygen is generated in the skin by by UV. In vivo, it is linked to the oxidation of LDL cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. Singlet oxygen is highly unstable and durable. Carotenoids are very effective at scavenging singlet oxygen. Superoxide Anion is a precursor of all other reactive oxygen species and sometimes is referred to as “the mother of free radicals.” It is highly toxic and contributes to lipid and DNA damage. Antioxidants that scavenge superoxide anion also help prevent the formation of radicals such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl. Superoxide anion has been linked to hypertension and cardiovascular damage.

Recently, Brunswick Labs has introduced a new test called ORAC6.0. This test expands the ORAC platform to measure the antioxidant capacity against each of the five primary reactive oxygen species mentioned above as well as Hypochlorite (HOCl) which is another important free radical that is commonly found in the body as a by-product of the metabolism of other free radicals. Direct reaction of HOCl with plasmid DNA gives rise to single- and double-strand breaks via chloramine-mediated reactions. ORAC6.0 substantially improves broad-spectrum antioxidant analysis and gives evidence of the diverse antioxidant potential of natural products against radicals other than just peroxyl.  Brunswick Labs’ research shows that the antioxidants found in a wide range of natural products are effective against these primary radicals, and that in many cases a preponderance of a product’s antioxidant capacity is described by performance against the six free radicals included to the ORAC6.0 panel.

RESULTS OF ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ ORAC6.0 TEST

Recently [August/2019] Brunswick Labs has tested ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ using the new ORAC6.0 tests. The results reveal an incredible overall ORAC6.0 value of 272,743 µmole TE/gram (i.e., 272,743 per gram!). In addition, the results show that the formula offers excellent protection against all of the six types of free radicals. Specifically, the results show values of 3,376 µmole TE/gram for peroxyl radicals, 5,569 µmole TE/gram for hydroxyl radicals, 2,758 µmole TE/gram for peroxynitrite radicals, 221,866 µmole TE/gram for superoxide anion radicals, 34,169 µmole TE/gram for singlet oxygen radicals, and 5,005 µmole TE/gram for hypochlorite radicals. The table (below) shows for each free radical type the ORAC6.0 daily values for six capsules of ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ containing 3.55 grams of the formula.

The overall daily ORAC6.0™ value for six capsules  obtained by adding the values for each free radical type is 968,237 units (272,743 units x 3.55 g)! To the best of our knowledge there is no other product that even comes close to providing such complete protection both in terms of breadth of coverage and overall strength. The Brunswick Labs ORAC6.0™ test results for ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ are posted on our blog.


Ultimate Protector+ nrf2 activator formula

 

The bottom line is that you (or anyone) can stand to benefit dramatically from an advanced antioxidant formula that provides exceedingly high ORAC6.0 values and hence amazingly high cell protection…with just a modest daily dose of six small capsules. If you are at all interested to see how well this formula can protect your heath, then we suggest you try a bottle. See for yourself how ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ acts to provide you with the ultimate level of protection against free radicals. It’s 100% guaranteed.

ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ ORAC6.0 Units Per Serving (six capsules)

ORAC6.0 Units
Per Serving*

Free Radical Type
11,985 Peroxyl Radical is very important in many biological systems, including lipid peroxidation, DNA cleavage, and protein backbone modification.
19,770 Hydroxyl is highly reactive and cannot be eliminated by our endogenous enzymes. It damages virtually all types of macromolecules: carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and amino acids. In the skin, hydroxyl radicals are created by UV exposure.
9,791 Peroxynitrite is a reactive nitrogen species that is particularly harmful to proteins. It has been implicated in the development of certain cancers, hepatitis, and chronic inflammation. In the skin, peroxynitrite contributes to the breakdown of vital proteins, such as collagen.
121,300 Singlet Oxygen is generated in the skin by UV exposure. It is linked to the oxidation of LDL cholesterol and cardiovascular disease.
787,624 Superoxide Anion is a precursor of all other reactive oxygen species – sometimes referred to as “the mother of free radicals.” It is highly toxic and contributes to lipid and DNA damage.

17,768

Hypochlorite HOCl – direct reaction of HOCl with plasmid DNA gives rise to single- and double-strand breaks via chloramine-mediated reactions.

968,237

Total ORAC6.0 Per Daily Serving of Six Capsules (3.55 g)

View the Brunswick Labs Ultimate Protector™ ORAC6.0 Test Report Here

 

ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ contains USP-grade non-GMO Vitamin C, SFB® standardized fruit blend (~50% polyphenols, high-ORAC powder: 9,000 µmole TE/g) from Grape, Cranberry, Pomegranate, Blueberry, Apple, Mangosteen, Bilberry, Chokeberry, and Goji Berry), Curcumin (standardized extract with 95% curcuminoids), Trans-Resveratrol (98% from Giant Knotweed), Green Tea Extract (93% polyphenols, 50% EGCG), VinCare® Whole Grape Extract (>80% polyphenols, ORAC>19,000 µmole TE/g), Calcium Malate, Magnesium Malate, and Bioperine® (a patented black pepper extract that enhances absorption of all ingredients and is a known Nrf2 activator).

* Full-spectrum antioxidants in Ultimate Protector+ include polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanidins, oligomeric proanthocyanidins, catechins, curcuminoids, ellagic acid, pterostilbene, resveratrol, chlorogenic acid, xanthines, punicalagins, quercetin, zeaxanthin, carotenoids, polysaccharides, quinic acid, and others.

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Rejuvenation Program: Part Four

FOUNDATIONAL ELEMENTS IN THE HPDI MASTER REJUVENATION PROGRAM

Fred Liers PhD rejuvenation programThe HPDI Rejuvenation Program provides practices, protocols, and recommendations proven over 31 years. It is a complete program to rejuvenate, regenerate, and boost vitality to body, mind, and spirit. It is especially helpful for those who want to restore health.

The program emphasizes establishing basic nutrition, foundational nutritional formulas, and high-RNA Rejuvenate!™ superfoods and other sources of dietary nucleic acids. The program rests on six elements: 1) Attitude/Commitment, 2) Detoxification, 3) Preventing Toxicity, 4) Health Building Nutrition, 5) Building Powerful Immunity, and 6) Supporting Protocols.

The six foundational elements remain powerful individually, but act synergistically when combined to support optimal health. The results are greatly improved capabilities for your body to heal, regenerate, rejuvenate, and restore its vitality.

As I stated in Part Three of the Rejuvenation Program series, health building nutrition plays a major role in the process of rejuvenation. We recommend emphasizing organic and/or wildcrafted foods, consuming more plant-based foods, raw foods, and generally consuming natural, whole foods (e.g., avoiding refined/processed foods).

I also discussed foods recommended in our Rejuvenation Program. Our recommendations include consuming foods high in nucleic acids (RNA and DNA). RNA-rich foods include chlorella and  Rejuvenate!™ superfoods. Rejuvenate! superfoods provide therapeutic levels of nucleic acids to support optimal rejuvenation, revitalization, and health. They also provide supporting nutrients (e.g., d-ribose, coenzyme B vitamins) that maximize utilization and healing effects of dietary nucleic acids in the body.

HPDI offers three versions of Rejuvenate!, including Rejuvenate! (original greens)Rejuvenate PLUS, and Rejuvenate! Berries & Herbs. Rejuvenate! PLUS and Rejuvenate Berries & Herbs are the most complete. Both provide delicious taste, therapeutic levels of dietary RNA, nutrients that support the body’s use of nucleic acids (e.g., d-ribose), a complete multivitamin, essential fats, and high levels of protein.

THE NEED FOR NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTATION

Last month, I discussed dietary/food aspects of nutrition. Today, I present key roles played by what we call “foundational” (or sometimes “core”) nutritional supplements. Foundational nutritional supplements are one of the critical means to success in creating powerful health by establishing optimal nutrient status in the body. Foundational supplements include: 1) multivitamins, 2) An antioxidant / Vitamin C formula, 3) essential fats, and 4) high-RNA superfoods.

We have found that proper nutritional supplementation provides important nutrients not always easily available in the diet. This partly relates to the fact that our needs for nutrients have never been greater. In addition, there are various reasons that most foods are deficient in nutrients, and therefore cannot or do not provide levels of nutrients required to sustain optimal health.

Some reasons dietary supplements are necessary include the fact that most crops are grown in nutrient-deficient or depleted soils; increased demands by the body due to greater needs for nutrients (relating to detoxification, stress, pollution, etc.); biochemical individuality resulting in greater needs for certain nutrients depending on the biochemistry unique to individuals. Biochemical individuality means that a person may require many times the US Daily Value of specific nutrients. In fact, one person may need hundreds of times the amount of a nutrient compared to a different person.

In addition, needs change during the year due to environmental circumstances. Changing seasons, environments, air/water supply, etc. mean that an individual’s need for nutrients typically changes during the year (e.g., more vitamin D needed in the winter, more nutrients needed to deal with pollution associated with urban environments or stress, etc.). Nutrient density of foods also varies by location, season, etc. The availability of nutrients in foods (even organically grown foods) can vary substantially due to season, geography, growing methods, etc.

All these factors add up to the fact that it is difficult to ensure optimal nutrient status without supplementation. Because the need for nutrients is greater than ever for most people, the need for nutritional supplementation is also greater than ever. Nutritional supplements provide an effective (and cost effective) means to ensure the high levels of nutrients required to build, sustain, and maintain optimal health.

NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS IN THE HPDI REJUVENATION PROGRAM

ESTABLISHING FOUNDATIONAL NUTRITION

Foundational formulas are the primary supplements we recommend for success not only in our Rejuvenation Program, but also for helping create better health generally. In fact, foundational supplement formulas are the basic building blocks for establishing and maintaining high nutritional status at all times in any program. (While foods are your primary source of nutrients, nutritional supplements are the best way to ensure intake of nutrients needed for good health.)

As noted above, the four foundational nutritional supplements we recommend are: 1) a high-potency multivitamin, 2) an essential fats formula (omega-3 and omega-6), and 3) Vitamin C (preferably buffered) with antioxidants (especially bioflavonoids), and 4) Rejuvenate!™ superfoods (and/or other high-RNA superfoods).

These four types of foundational formulas are the most important supplements and superfoods. Even if you take no other dietary supplements, these are the formulas that ensure you get basic nutrients required for good health. In fact, no diet or nutritional supplementation program is complete without them.

I will now consider the four types of foundational formulas, explain how they function, and reasons why they essential for good health.

FOUNDATIONAL #1: A HIGH-QUALITY MULTIVITAMIN

A high-quality, high-potency multivitamin is the single most important supplement you can take. A good multivitamin ensures you receive important nutrients not always available in optimal amounts in foods. Taking a multivitamin helps guarantee uptake of nutrients that ar e not readily available because modern diets have strayed far from traditional diets. In addition, modern lifestyles create far greater demands for critical nutrients even as many nutrients are increasingly less available from foods. Multivitamins help break the cycle of deficiency and degeneration.

Critical nutrients provided by a good therapeutic multivitamin formula include a wide range of essential vitamins, minerals, and cofactors. Such a formula will usually include trace minerals, fat-soluble vitamins (A, E, D, & K), coenzyme B vitamins, magnesium, or other nutrients known to be deficient in the diets of most individuals.

Important factors to consider when looking for a good multivitamin, include high-potency, forms, completeness, balance, assimilability (e.g., ease of uptake and rapid assimilation), ease of use (convenience), etc.

High-potency is important because for most nutrients, the so-called “daily value” is simply inadequate for most people. Most individuals need many times the daily value of vitamins for good health. This is because daily values are established based on minimum amounts required for sustain life (e.g., survival) rather than the optimal amounts needed for good health.

As noted, studies of biochemical individuality show that individuals may require many times greater amounts of specific nutrients than are needed by the average person. Because most vitamins (especially water soluble ones) are essentially non-toxic even in relatively large doses (i.e., hundreds or sometimes thousands of times the daily value), it pays to provide your body with larger amounts of critical nutrients that it may require because you may not be an ‘average’ person.

Complicating this picture is the fact that individuals needs for specific nutrients vary widely. Thus, for example, one person’s need for vitamin C may be somewhat higher than average, yet the same person’s need for vitamin D may be significantly higher than average.

The proper forms of the nutrients are another critical factor. While forms have not always been a prime consideration (either of consumers or formulators), they are critically important. Forms are worthy of attention because we know that the form of a vitamin or mineral can make a major difference in terms of how it assimilated and used in the body.

For example, Krebs cycle bionutrients (i.e., mineral carriers, such as citrates, malates, alpha-ketoglutarates, succinates, or fumarates) are known to be superior precisely because they are the forms naturally recognized and utilized in the body. This is because these forms are used in the Krebs cycle (or citric acid cycle) that is part of the metabolic pathway used to generate energy (ATP) from nutrients in foods. In contrast, elemental forms of minerals and/or forms that are not part of the Krebs cycle may be more difficult to assimilate because they must be converted into forms the body can use. The biological cost is reduced bioavailability, as well as cellular energy expense and time required for metabolic conversion. As you can see, forms matter for health!

Other important factors include completeness and balance. Completeness is important in a multivitamin because the body requires a wide range of nutrients working together to create and sustain health. Many multivitamins are neither complete nor balanced. This relates partly to the fact that multivitamins are often not designed with an understanding of nutrients, forms, or amounts needed for health. Consequently, many commonly available multivitamins incorporate less effective forms, inadequate amounts, and improper ratios of nutrients. This reflects a general lack of understanding by formulators about how nutrients work together to build and sustain health. In contrast, supplements are available that provide completeness and balance.

HPDI offers several high-quality, balanced, and complete multivitamins providing easily assimilated forms of nutrients in optimal amounts. These include Hank & Brian’s Mighty Multi-Vite!, Multi Two caps or tabs, and Chewable Kids Mighty-Multi! (which is also designed for adults to enjoy, too). We recommend our capsule formulas because they are the easier to assimilate. However, our tablet formulas are both effective and cost-effective. Children benefit greatly from a multivitamin, and for them we offer our chewable Kids Mighty-Multi! multivitamin formula.

FOUNDATIONAL #2: AN ANTIOXIDANT / VITAMIN C FORMULA

Vitamin C is legendary for its healing capacities. Yet, it is notable that despite numerous studies and accolades by nutritionists, it remains underutilized by mainstream medicine and is completely under-appreciated for the healing powerhouse it represents for human health.

We include Vitamin C as a foundational formula because we understand its role in creating and sustaining optimal health. Vitamin C not only is a potent antioxidant, but also a powerful immune builder/anti-viral, cholesterol controller, and connective tissue strengthener. In fact, no other vitamin or nutrient can take its place in terms of what it can contribute to human health, longevity, and well-being.

Ever since Linus Pauling wrote Vitamin C and the Common Cold, Vitamin C has held a place of esteem among nutritional scientists and consumers of Vitamin C products. Pauling went on to present further studies and to write his best-seller How to Live Longer and Feel Better (rev. 2006). Vitamin C plays a major role both in his discussion of vitamins and in the supplement regimens he recommends.

In nature, Vitamin C is always combined with bioflavanoids. Bioflavanoids (such as rutin, quercetin, catechins, anthocyandins, and oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs)), work synergistically with Vitamin C to create powerful antioxidant effects, counteract inflammation, and strengthen connective tissues. In addition, Vitamin C and bioflavanoids combine with other antioxidants (including glutathione, lipoic acid, and selenium) in a process called “redox cycling.” In this process, antioxidants protect and “spare” each other, thereby allowing for significantly increased antioxidant protection in the body.

We offer a variety of Vitamin C products, including formulas with bioflavonoids. Our Vitamin C formulas include Ultimate Protector+™, PRO-C™, Buffered Vitamin C tabs, and Buffered Vitamin C powder. We typically recommend taking a buffered Vitamin C product to prevent acidosis and help maintain proper pH levels in the body.

We consistently find that one of greatest means for success in creating health using dietary supplements is to ensure you take all four types of foundational formulas. For example, many people take one or two foundational formulas: a multivitamin, essential fats, Vitamin C plus bioflavonoids, and/or high-RNA superfoods. But how many people take all four daily? Do you take all four daily? You might be surprised at the results if you took them all daily. This is because foundational formulas work together synergistically and leverage each other in ways that exceed the health-building effects that can be expected when foundational formulas are taken individually.

FOUNDATIONAL #3: AN ESSENTIAL FATS FORMULA

Many people understand the need to take supplemental multivitamins. The need for essential fatty acids (EFAs) has gained increased attention recently, and it is no less important. More people are consuming fish, fish oils, and vegetarian sources of essential fats, including chia seeds. However, the need for supplementing diet with essential fats to ensure adequate daily intake has never been greater than today.

There are two basic essential fats: alpha-linoleic acid (omega-3) and linolenic acid (omega-6). Other fats are sometimes included as being essential fats, including gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an important omega-6 fatty acid, and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA), important omega-3 fatty acids.

Essential fats are considered ‘essential’ because they are needed for biological processes (i.e., they are required to sustain life) rather than acting only as a food-based source of energy (as do many other non-essential fatty acids). Humans, therefore, must ingest essential fatty acids both for survival and for good health.

Essential fats play multiple roles in the body and serve many different functions. These functions include being modified to make eicosanoids (affecting pain and inflammatory processes); regulating steroid production and hormone synthesis; regulating pressure in the eyes, joints and blood vessels; mediating the immune response; regulating smooth muscle and autonomic reflexes; are needed for oxygen transport from red blood cells to tissues; are necessary for kidney function and fluid balance; preventing clumping of red blood cells; regulating mood and depression, and regulating nerve transmission.

Every cell and organelle within the cells are encased and protected by membrane made of phospholipids. A major component of these phospholipids are essential fatty acids that control membrane fluidity and the ability to pass important nutrients into the cells and toxins out of the cells. Without adequate essential fats the cell membranes can become rigid and dysfunctional.

We offer an essential fats product, called Hank & Brian’s Essential Fats Plus E. This product contains EPA and DHA from highly purified fish oils, GLA from cold-processed borage oil, and full spectrum Vitamin E consisting of all eight natural forms of tocotrienols and tocopherols. These mixed forms of Vitamin E perform many beneficial functions in the body (such as lowering cholesterol and clearing plague out of blood vessels) and also protect the essential fats from oxidizing in the capsule and in your body. The ratio of EPA to GLA in this products is 4:1, which is considered the ideal ratio for optimal effects in the body.

FOUNDATIONAL #4: HIGH-RNA SUPERFOODS, INCLUDING REJUVENATE! FORMULAS

Our recommendations for foundational formulas now include high-RNA superfoods. We first recommend a multivitamin, an antioxidant / Vitamin C formula, and essential fatty acids. After these three foundational formulas are established in a daily regimen, the addition of a high-RNA superfood further contributes to excellent health.

We include high-RNA superfoods (and especially recommend Rejuvenate!™ superfoods) in our foundational supplements program after having studied the remarkable healing powers of chlorella and other high-RNA nutrients for six years. When taken in sufficient amounts, superfoods high in ribonucleic acid (RNA) show remarkable effects in the body. These effects include higher energy levels, greater endurance, better muscle strength, easier breathing, lower cholesterol levels, reductions in angina pains (and other positive cardiovascular effects), more stable blood sugar, better vision, and a more youthful appearance (smoother skin, fewer wrinkles, etc.), and many other benefits.

Our assessment of dietary nucleic acids being essential nutrients is shared by scientists on the cutting-edge of nutrition. In Nucleic Acid Nutrition and Therapy, Dr. Benjamin S. Frank asserts that dietary nucleic acids (RNA, DNA) are “essential nutrients of human beings” as distinct from non-essential, accessory nutrients. He considers nucleic acids and nucleotides an essential dietary category, i.e., as being nutrients “just as essential for humans as vitamins, minerals, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids” (Frank).

After having studied the positive health effects of dietary RNA in the clinic for more than 20 years, Dr. Frank asserted:

“[N]ucleic acids are an essential nutrient in our daily diets, and […] optimal health and reduced aging are clearly related to their intake, more than to any other nutrient. Nucleic acids in our diets are of paramount importance for the repairing of molecular and gross tissue degeneration, and for combating the process of aging by simple, effective and essentially non-toxic, natural means.”

Dr. Frank’s conclusion that RNA is more essential to health than any other single nutrient underscores the central role of nucleic acids for human health.

We share Dr. Frank’s conclusions regarding the “essential” nature of nucleic acids and nucleotides, and their central role in human health. In fact, it is our direct experience with the health-building effects of dietary nucleic acids (e.g., in chlorella and other foods) that led to further our knowledge of nucleic acid nutrition and therapy, and develop our line of high-RNA Rejuvenate!™ superfoods. Rejuvenate!™ superfoods both provide optimal levels of nucleic acids and include supporting nutrients (e.g., d-ribose, coenzyme B vitamins), which maximize the beneficial effects of dietary RNA for health.

The nucleic acids in Rejuvenate!™ superfoods work directly with HPDI’s other foundational nutritional supplements to create, sustain, and support optimal nutrition for health and healing. We recommend Rejuvenate!™ and/or other high-RNA superfoods as part of program of foundational nutritional supplements that work together to provide full spectrum nutrition. It is because foundational formulas provides a full spectrum of essential nutrients that it is critical to success in our Rejuvenation Program, and to create, maintain, and/or rebuild health.

FOUR FOUNDATIONAL SUPPLEMENTS  =  POWERFUL SYNERGY FOR HEALTH

The best news with respect to dietary nucleic acids is that while they are essential nutrients, their inclusion in our foundational supplement program powerfully leverages their effects by facilitating greater synergy among all nutrients available to the body via foundational supplements. This synergy means the total package of nutrients delivered by all four types of foundational supplements combined delivers far more health-building nutrition than any single foundational formula delivers individually. That’s synergy in action.

The means by which all four foundational supplements succeed in creating and contributing to powerful health relates less to the fact that each singly provides an ‘essential’ piece of the nutrition puzzle. Success relates instead to the fact that when all foundational formulas are taken together, their healthy benefits multiply and greatly exceed the sum of benefits provided by individual foundational formulas. This is a primary reason we emphasize establishing foundational nutrition both within our Rejuvenation Program, and more generally as a starting point for the creation of powerful health.

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ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ INGREDIENTS – CRANBERRY

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD biography about us HPDI integratedhealth formulator founder CEO scientist physicist wild bilberry and wild blueberryUltimate Protector+ contains cranberry extract, as well as components from 12 different fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Each of these ingredients contain substances that may be considered to be polyphenols, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators. In this article I will explore the ingredient cranberry, which is a component of SFB® – Standardized Fruit Blend from Ethical Naturals, Inc.

Ultimate Protector+ Includes Cranberry

Ultimate Protector+ Includes Cranberry Extract

SFB® – Standardized Fruit Blend

SFB® is a proprietary formula that combines extracts from Grape, Cranberry, Pomegranate, Blueberry, Apple, Mangosteen, Bilberry, Chokeberry, and Goji Berry. It is high in fruit polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, catechins, proanthocyanins, ellagic acid, xanthines, chlorogenic acid, pterostilbenes, resveratrol, phloridzin, quercetin, zeaxanthin, carotenoids, polysaccharides, quinic acid, and more. With its diverse blend, SFB® offers over 40-50% polyphenols as well as >9,000 ORAC units in a single gram.

Polyphenols, anthocyanins and other plant elements are powerful ingredients associated with a variety of areas of human health, including healthy aging, healthy glucose metabolism, cardiovascular health, and inflammation management.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF CRANBERRIES

Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) are native to the boggy regions of temperate and subalpine North America and Europe. Although Native Americans used them extensively, they were first cultivated in the U.S. in the early 19th century. Cranberries grow on viney plants belonging to the heath family Ericaceae that also includes blueberries, bilberries, huckleberries, and bearberries (Arctostaphylos uva ursi). Cranberries contain tannins, fiber, anthocyanins (and other flavonoids), and Vitamin C. Their tannins prevent bacteria from attaching to cells. Consequently, cranberries have been used against infections, including urinary tract infections. In addition, cranberries may be helpful in protecting against heart disease and stroke.

Cranberry extract is an especially good source of antioxidant polyphenols. In animal studies, the polyphenols in cranberries have been found to decrease levels of total cholesterol and so-called “bad” cholesterol. Cranberries may also inhibit the growth of tumors in human breast tissue and lower the risk of both stomach ulcers and gum disease. 

Here is a list of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory phytonutrients in found in cranberry extract.

Type of Phytonutrient             Specific Molecules
Phenolic Acids                             hydroxybenzoic acids including vanillic acids;
—Phenolic Acids (cont.)             hydroxycinnamic acids inculding caffeic,
—Phenolic Acids (cont.)             coumaric, cinnamic, and ferulic acid
Proanthocyanidins                     epicatechins
Anthocyanins                              cyanidins, malvidins, and peonidins
Flavonoids                                   quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol
Triterpenoids                              ursolic acid

OTHER CRANBERRY INFORMATION

    • Cranberries hold significantly high amounts of phenolic flavonoid phytochemicals called oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC’s). Scientific studies have shown that consumption of the berries have potential health benefits against cancer, aging and neurological diseases, inflammation, diabetes, and bacterial infections.
    • Antioxidant compounds in cranberry extract including OPC’s, anthocyanidin flavonoids, cyanidin, peonidin and quercetin may prevent cardiovascular disease by counteracting against cholesterol plaque formation in the heart and blood vessels. Further, these compounds help the human body lower LDL cholesterol levels and increase HDL-good cholesterol levels in the blood.
    • Scientific studies show that cranberry juice consumption offers protection against gram-negative bacterial infections such as E.coli in the urinary system by inhibiting bacterial-attachment to the bladder and urethra.
    • It is known that cranberries turns urine acidic. This, together with the inhibition of bacterial adhesion helps prevent the formation of alkaline (calcium ammonium phosphate) stones in the urinary tract by working against proteus bacterial-infections.
    • In addition, the berries prevent plaque formation on the tooth enamel by interfering with the ability of the gram-negative bacterium, Streptococcus mutans, to stick to the surface. In this way cranberries helps prevent the development of cavities.
    • The berries are also good source of many vitamins like vitamin C, vitamin A, ß-carotene, lutein, zea-xanthin, and folate and minerals like potassium, and manganese.
  • Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) demonstrates cranberry at an ORAC score of 9584 µmol TE units per 100 g, one of the highest in the category of edible berries.

For more information on cranberries visit: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=145

SCIENTIFIC STUDIES ON THE ANTIOXIDANT EFFECTS OF CRANBERRIES

Below, I provide relevant scientific studies on the antioxidant effects and potential health benefits of cranberries.

PREVENTION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS, INFLAMMATION AND MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION IN THE INTESTINE BY DIFFERENT CRANBERRY PHENOLIC FRACTIONS.

ABSTRACT

Cranberry fruit has been reported to have high antioxidant effectiveness that is potentially linked to its richness in diversified polyphenolic content. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of cranberry polyphenolic fractions in oxidative stress (OxS), inflammation and mitochondrial functions using intestinal Caco-2/15 cells. The combination of HPLC and UltraPerformance LC®-tandem quadrupole (UPLC-TQD) techniques allowed us to characterize the profile of low, medium and high molecular mass polyphenolic compounds in cranberry extracts. The medium molecular mass fraction was enriched with flavonoids and procyanidin dimers whereas procyanidin oligomers (DP > 4) were the dominant class of polyphenols in the high molecular mass fraction. Pre-incubation of Caco-2/15 cells with these cranberry extracts prevented iron/ascorbate-mediated lipid peroxidation and counteracted lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation as evidenced by the decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and interleukin-6), cyclo-oxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2. Cranberry polyphenols (CP) fractions limited both nuclear factor κB activation and Nrf2 down-regulation. Consistently, cranberry procyanidins alleviated OxS-dependent mitochondrial dysfunctions as shown by the rise in ATP production and the up-regulation of Bcl-2, as well as the decline of protein expression of cytochrome c and apoptotic-inducing factor. These mitochondrial effects were associated with a significant stimulation of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1-α, a central inducing factor of mitochondrial biogenesis and transcriptional co-activator of numerous downstream mediators. Finally, cranberry procyanidins forestalled the effect of iron/ascorbate on the protein expression of mitochondrial transcription factors (mtTFA, mtTFB1, mtTFB2). Our findings provide evidence for the capacity of CP to reduce intestinal OxS and inflammation while improving mitochondrial dysfunction.

 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND CHEMO-PROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF CRANBERRY PHENOLIC POWDERS IN A MODEL CELL CULTURE. RESPONSE OF THE ANTIOXIDANT DEFENSES AND REGULATION OF SIGNALING PATHWAYS

ABSTRACT

Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell damage are implicated in various chronic pathologies. Emerging studies show that polyphenols may act by increasing endogenous antioxidant defense potential. Cranberry has one of the highest polyphenol content among commonly consumed fruits. In this study, the hepato-protective activity of a cranberry juice (CJ) and cranberry extract (CE) powders against oxidative stress was screened using HepG2 cells, looking at ROS production, intracellular non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant defenses by reduced glutathione concentration (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activity and lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA). Involvement of major protein kinase signaling pathways was also evaluated. Both powders in basal conditions did not affect cell viability but decreased ROS production and increased GPx activity, conditions that may place the cells in favorable conditions against oxidative stress. Powder pre-treatment of HepG2 cells for 20 h significantly reduced cell damage induced by 400 μM tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) for 2 h. Both powders (5–50 μg/ml) reduced t-BOOH-induced increase of MDA by 20% (CJ) and 25% (CE), and significantly reduced over-activated GPx and GR. CE, with a significantly higher amount of polyphenols than CJ, prevented a reduction in GSH and significantly reduced ROS production. CJ reversed the t-BOOH-induced increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase. This study demonstrates that cranberry polyphenols may help protect liver cells against oxidative insult by modulating GSH concentration, ROS and MDA generation, antioxidant enzyme activity and cell signaling pathways.

CRANBERRY EXTRACT SUPPRESSES INTERLEUKIN-8 SECRETION FROM STOMACH CELLS STIMULATED BY HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN EVERY CLINICALLY SEPARATED STRAIN BUT INHIBITS GROWTH IN PART OF THE STRAINS

From: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1756464613000364

ABSTRACT

It is known that cranberry inhibits the growth of Helicobacter pylori (HP). In human stomach, HP basically induces chronic inflammation by stimulating stomach cells to secrete interleukin (IL)-8 and other inflammatory cytokines, and causes stomach cancer, etc. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibiting effects of cranberry on HP growth and IL-8 secretion from stomach cells induced by HP, using clinically separated HP strains. HP growth in liquid culture and on-plate culture was evaluated by titration after 2-day incubation and by agar dilution technique, respectively. For IL-8 experiments, MKN-45, a stomach cancer cell line, was incubated with HP for 24 h and IL-8 in the medium was assayed by ELISA. Cranberry suppressed growth of the bacteria only in six of the 27 strains. Meanwhile, it suppressed IL-8 secretion in all the strains. The results may suggest a possible role of cranberry in prevention of stomach cancer by reducing gastric inflammation.

EFFECTS OF CRANBERRY POWDER ON BIOMARKERS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS AND GLUCOSE CONTROL IN DB/DB MICE

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24353827

ABSTRACT

Increased oxidative stress in obese diabetes may have causal effects on diabetic complications, including dyslipidemia. Lipopolysccharides (LPS) along with an atherogenic diet have been found to increase oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Cranberry has been recognized as having beneficial effects on diseases related to oxidative stress. Therefore, we employed obese diabetic animals treated with an atherogenic diet and LPS, with the aim of examining the effects of cranberry powder (CP) on diabetic related metabolic conditions, including lipid profiles, serum insulin and glucose, and biomarkers of oxidative stress. Forty C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice were divided into the following five groups: normal diet + saline, atherogenic diet + saline, atherogenic diet + LPS, atherogenic diet + 5% CP + LPS, and atherogenic diet + 10% CP + LPS. Consumption of an atherogenic diet resulted in elevation of serum total cholesterol and atherogenic index (AI) and reduction of high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. However, with 10% CP, the increase in mean HDL-cholesterol level was close to that of the group with a normal diet, whereas AI was maintained at a higher level than that of the group with a normal diet. LPS induced elevated serum insulin level was lowered by greater than 60% with CP (P < 0.05), and mean serum glucose level was reduced by approximately 19% with 5% CP (P > 0.05). Mean activity of liver cytosolic glutathione peroxidase was significantly increased by LPS injection, however it was reduced back to the value without LPS when the diet was fortified with 10% CP (P < 0.05). In groups with CP, a reduction in mean levels of serum protein carbonyl tended to occur in a dose dependent manner. Particularly with 10% CP, a reduction of approximately 89% was observed (P > 0.05). Overall results suggest that fortification of the atherogenic diet with CP may have potential health benefits for obese diabetes with high oxidative stress, by modulation of physical conditions, including some biomarkers of oxidative stress.

SUMMARY

Cranberry extract is full of polyphenols, anthocyanins, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators that help to make Ultimate Protector+ such an outstanding nutritional supplement.

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ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ INGREDIENTS – BLUEBERRY AND BILBERRY

Dr. Hank Liers, PhDUltimate Protector+ contains blueberry and bilberry extracts, as well as components from 12 different fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Each of these ingredients contain substances that may be considered to be polyphenols, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators. In this article, I will explore the ingredients blueberry and bilberry, which are components of SFB® – Standardized Fruit Blend from Ethical Naturals, Inc.

Ultimate Protector+ Includes Blueberry and Bilberry

Ultimate Protector+ Includes Bilberry and Blueberry

SFB® – Standardized Fruit Blend

SFB® is a proprietary formula that combines extracts from Grape, Cranberry, Pomegranate, Blueberry, Apple, Mangosteen, Bilberry, Chokeberry, and Goji Berry. High in fruit polyphenols, anthocyanins, proanthocyanins, catechins, ellagic acid, chlorogenic acid, resveratrol, and quinic acid. With its diverse blend, SFB® offers over 40–50% polyphenols as well as >9,000 ORAC units in a single gram.

Polyphenols, anthocyanins, and other plant components are powerful ingredients associated with a variety of areas of human health, including healthy aging, healthy glucose metabolism, cardiovascular health, and inflammation management.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF
BILBERRY AND BLUEBERRY

Bilberry is any of several Eurasian  species of low-growing shrubs in the genus Vaccinium, bearing edible, nearly black berries. The species most often referred to is Vaccinium myrtillus L., but there are several other closely related species. Bilberries are distinct from blueberries but closely related. Whereas the bilberry is native to Europe, the blueberry is native to North America.

The bilberry fruit is smaller than that of the blueberry, but with a fuller taste. Bilberries are darker in color, and usually appear near black with a slight shade of purple. While blueberry fruit pulp is light green in color, bilberry is red or purple, heavily staining the fingers, lips, and tongue of consumers eating the raw fruit. The color comes from diverse anthocyanins.

So-called wild (lowbush) blueberries, smaller than cultivated highbush ones, are prized for their intense color. “Wild” has been adopted as a marketing term for harvests of managed native stands of lowbush blueberries. The bushes are not planted or genetically manipulated, but they are pruned or burned every two years, and pests are “managed.” The content of polyphenols and anthocyanins in lowbush (wild) blueberries (V. angustifolium) exceeds values found in highbush cultivars.

wild bilberry and wild blueberry

Wild bilberry and wild blueberry provide Nrf2 activators.

The key compounds in bilberry fruit are called anthocyanins and anthocyanosides. These compounds help build strong blood vessels and improve circulation to all areas of the body. They also prevent blood platelets from clumping together (helping to reduce the risk of blood clots), and they have antioxidant properties (preventing or reducing damage to cells from free radicals). Anthocyanins boost the production of rhodopsin, a pigment that improves night vision and helps the eye adapt to light changes.

Bilberry fruit is also rich in tannins, a substance that acts as an astringent. The tannins have anti-inflammatory properties and may help control diarrhea.

Bilberries have been shown to have the highest Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) rating of more than 20 fresh fruits and berries. The antioxidant properties of bilberries were shown to be even stronger than those of cranberries, raspberries, strawberries, plums, or cultivated blueberries.

The antioxidant powers and health benefits of bilberries and blueberries can be attributed to a number of remarkable compounds contained in them, including the following:

  • Anthocyanins
    • malvidins
    • delphinidins
    • pelargonidins
    • cyanidins
    • peonidins
  • Hydroxycinnamic acids
    • caffeic acids
    • ferulic acids
    • coumaric acids
  • Hydroxybenzoic acids
    • gallic acids
    • procatchuic acids
  • Flavonols
    • kaempferol
    • quercetin
    • myricetin
  • Other phenol-related phytonutrients
    • pterostilbene
    • resveratrol
  • Other nutrients
    • lutein
    • zeaxanthin
    • Vitamin K
    • Vitamin C
    • manganese

Scientific Studies on the Antioxidant Effects of Bilberry and Blueberry

Databases of scientific studies (like the National Institutes of Health (NIH) PubMed database) contain thousands of up-to-date studies and abstracts about various Vaccinium species, including wild bilberry and wild blueberry (V. myrtillis and V. angustfolium, respectively).

We provide a few relevant scientific studies on the antioxidant effects of wild bilberry and wild blueberry.

In vitro anticancer activity of fruit extracts from Vaccinium species.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8693031

Abstract

Fruit extracts of four Vaccinium species (lowbush blueberry, bilberry, cranberry, and lingonberry) were screened for anticarcinogenic compounds by a combination of fractionation and in vitro testing of their ability to induce the Phase II xenobiotic detoxification enzyme quinone reductase (QR) and to inhibit the induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, by the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA). The crude extracts, anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin fractions were not highly active in QR induction whereas the ethyl acetate extracts were active QR inducers. The concentrations required to double QR activity (designated CDqr) for the ethyl acetate extracts of lowbush blueberry, cranberry, lingonberry, and bilberry were 4.2, 3.7, 1.3, and 1.0 microgram tannic acid equivalents (TAE), respectively, Further fractionation of the bilberry ethyl acetate extract revealed that the majority of inducer potency was contained in a hexane/chloroform subfraction (CDqr = 0.07 microgram TAE). In contrast to their effects on QR, crude extracts of lowbush blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry were active inhibitors of ODC activity. The concentrations of these crude extracts needed to inhibit ODC activity by 50% (designated IC50) were 8.0, 7.0, and 9.0 micrograms TAE, respectively. The greatest activity in these extracts appeared to be contained in the polymeric proanthocyanidin fractions of the lowbush blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry fruits (IC50 = 3.0, 6.0, and 5.0 micrograms TAE, respectively). The anthocyanidin and ethyl acetate extracts of the four Vaccinium species were either inactive or relatively weak inhibitors of ODC activity. Thus, components of the hexane/chloroform fraction of bilberry and of the proanthocyanidin fraction of lowbush blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry exhibit potential anticarcinogenic activity as evaluated by in vitro screening tests.

Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) anthocyanins modulate heme oxygenase-1 and glutathione S-transferase-pi expression in ARPE-19 cells.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17460300

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine whether anthocyanin-enriched bilberry extracts modulate pre- or posttranslational levels of oxidative stress defense enzymes heme-oxygenase (HO)-1 and glutathione S-transferase-pi (GST-pi) in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells.

METHODS: Confluent ARPE-19 cells were preincubated with anthocyanin and nonanthocyanin phenolic fractions of a 25% enriched extract of bilberry (10(-6)-1.0 mg/mL) and, after phenolic removal, cells were oxidatively challenged with H(2)O(2). The concentration of intracellular glutathione was measured by HPLC and free radical production determined by the dichlorofluorescin diacetate assay. HO-1 and GST-pi protein and mRNA levels were determined by Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively.

RESULTS: Preincubation with bilberry extract ameliorated the intracellular increase of H(2)O(2)-induced free radicals in RPE, though H(2)O(2) cytotoxicity was not affected. By 4 hours, the extract had upregulated HO-1 and GST-pi protein by 2.8- and 2.5-fold, respectively, and mRNA by 5.5- and 7.1-fold, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Anthocyanin and nonanthocyanin phenolic fractions contributed similarly to mRNA upregulation.

CONCLUSIONS: Anthocyanins and other phenolics from bilberry upregulate the oxidative stress defense enzymes HO-1 and GST-pi in RPE, suggesting that they stimulate signal transduction pathways influencing genes controlled by the antioxidant response element.

Berry anthocyanins suppress the expression and secretion of proinflammatory mediators in macrophages by inhibiting nuclear translocation of NF-κB independent of NRF2-mediated mechanism.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24565673

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to compare the anti-inflammatory effects of anthocyanins from blueberry (BBA), blackberry (BKA), and blackcurrant (BCA) and to determine the relationship between their antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory effect in macrophages. Major anthocyanins in BBA, BKA and BCA were malvidin-3-glucoside (16%), cyanidin-3-glucoside (98%) and delphinidin-3-rutinoside (44%), respectively. BKA showed higher total antioxidant capacity than BBA and BCA. RAW 264.7 macrophages were incubated with 0-20 μg/ml of BBA, BKA and BCA, and subsequently activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to measure proinflammatory cytokine production. Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were significantly decreased by all berry anthocyanins at 10 μg/ml or higher. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA levels and secretion were also significantly decreased in LPS-treated macrophages. The levels of the repression were comparable for all berry anthocyanins. LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation to the nucleus was markedly attenuated by all of the berry anthocyanins. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) from nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 wild-type (Nrf2(+/+)) mice, BBA, BKA and BCA significantly decreased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels with a concomitant decrease in IL-1β mRNA levels upon LPS stimulation. However, in the BMM from Nrf2(-/-) mice, the anthocyanin fractions were able to significantly decrease IL-1β mRNA despite the fact that ROS levels were not significantly affected. In conclusion, BBA, BKA and BCA exert their anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages, at least in part, by inhibiting nuclear translocation of NF-κB independent of the NRF2-mediated pathways.

Purified Anthocyanins from Bilberry and Black Currant Attenuate Hepatic Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Steatohepatitis in Mice with Methionine and Choline Deficiency

From: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf504926n

Abstract

The berries of bilberry and black currant are rich source of anthocyanins, which are thought to have favorable effects on non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). This study was designed to examine whether purified anthocyanins from bilberry and black currant are able to limit the disorders related to NASH induced by a methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet in mice. The results showed that treatment with anthocyanins not only alleviated inflammation, oxidative stress, steatosis and even fibrosis, but also improved the depletion of mitochondrial content and damage of mitochondrial biogenesis and electron transfer chain developed concomitantly in the liver of mice fed the MCD diet. Furthermore, anthocyanins treatment promoted activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). These data provide evidence that anthocyanins possess significant protective effects against NASH and mitochondrial defects in response to a MCD diet, with mechanism maybe through affecting the AMPK/PGC-1α signaling pathways.

Effect of blueberry on hepatic and immunological functions in mice.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20382588

Abstract

Background: Conventional drugs used in the treatment and prevention of liver diseases often have side effects, therefore research into natural substances are of significance. This study examined the effects of blueberry on liver protection and cellular immune functions.

METHODS: To determine the effects of blueberry on liver protective function, male mice were orally administered blueberry (0.6 g/10 g) or normal saline for 21 days. Hepatic RNA was extracted by Trizol reagent, and the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and Nqo1 was determined by real-time RT-PCR. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver homogenate were determined, and liver index was measured. To assess the effects of blueberry on cellular immune function, male mice received blueberry (0.4, 0.6, or 0.8 g/10 g) for 35 days, and the percentages of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ T lymphocyte subgroups in peripheral blood were detected by flow cytometry, the index of the thymus and spleen was measured, and lymphocyte proliferation in the spleen was determined by MTT assay.

RESULTS: Blueberry treatment significantly increased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and Nqo1, the important antioxidant components in the liver. Hepatic SOD in the blueberry group was higher and MDA was lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Blueberry also increased the index of the spleen and enhanced the proliferation of lymphocytes of the spleen (P<0.05). The percentages of the CD3+ and CD4+ T lymphocyte subsets and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio were also increased by blueberry (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Blueberry induces expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and Nqo1, which can protect hepatocytes from oxidative stress. In addition, blueberry can modulate T-cell function in mice.

Anthocyanins: Janus Nutraceuticals Displaying Chemotherapeutic and Neuroprotective Properties

From: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-007-4575-9_21

Abstract

Anthocyanins are natural polyphenolic compounds widely distributed as pigments in many fruits and vegetables. In addition to displaying antioxidant properties, these nutraceuticals exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and pro-apoptotic activities suggesting their potential as novel chemotherapeutic agents. Through cell cycle down-regulation, and context-specific pro-oxidant activity, anthocyanins induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, via regulation of the Bcl-2 protein family and induction of caspase-dependent or caspase-independent apoptotic pathways, anthocyanins inhibit the growth of cancers by inducing cell death. Moreover, by modulating the activities of specific kinases and proteases, including (but not limited to) cyclin-dependent kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinases, matrix metalloproteases, and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, anthocyanins induce apoptosis, inhibit motility, and suppress invasion of cancer cells. In marked contrast to their effects in cancer cells, we have found that anthocyanins display significant anti-apoptotic activity in neurons. Antioxidant properties of these nutraceuticals, particularly at the level of the mitochondria, appear to underlie their neuroprotective effects. The opposing effects of anthocyanins on cancer cells and neurons suggest that these nutraceuticals are promising candidates for development as either chemotherapeutic agents or novel neuroprotective compounds for the treatment of cancers or neurodegenerative diseases, respectively.

Recent Research on Polyphenolics in Vision and Eye Health

From: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf903038r#end-1

Abstract

A long-standing yet controversial bioactivity attributed to polyphenols is their beneficial effects in vision. Although anecdotal case reports and in vitro research studies provide evidence for the visual benefits of anthocyanin-rich berries, rigorous clinical evidence of their benefits is still lacking. Recent in vitro studies demonstrate that anthocyanins and other flavonoids interact directly with rhodopsin and modulate visual pigment function. Additional in vitro studies show flavonoids protect a variety of retinal cell types from oxidative stress-induced cell death, a neuroprotective property of significance because the retina has the highest metabolic rate of any tissue and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative injury. However, more information is needed on the bioactivity of in vivo conjugates and the accumulation of flavonoids in ocular tissues. The direct and indirect costs of age-related vision impairment provide a powerful incentive to explore the potential for improved vision health through the intake of dietary polyphenolics.

Bilberry Extracts Induce Gene Expression Through the Electrophile Response Element

From: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/s15327914nc5401_11#.VLK6LVqBO24

Abstract

A number of genes important for detoxification and antioxidant defense induced by mild stress generated by, for example, physical activity/exercise, caloric restriction, or alcohol may provide health benefits by causing the organism to mount such a defense response. More recently, induction of these defenses has also been attributed to phytochemicals or secondary metabolites from dietary plants. Many polyphenols, which constitute a large fraction of these phytochemicals, increase cellular levels of antioxidants, such as glutathione and other components of the detoxification systems, via the transactivation of genes containing electrophile response elements (EpREs) within their promoters. One such gene, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, has previously been shown to be positively regulated by quercetin, a flavonoid found in high concentrations in onions, apples, and bilberries through EpRE transactivation. As a further step, we have investigated whether bilberries and quercetin have the ability to induce transcription of Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1), which contains two EpREs in its promoter. Fra-1 is a member of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) family of transcription factors and, due to the lack of transactivation domain Fra-1, can suppress activation of AP-1. We present results demonstrating that extracts from bilberries, and the flavonoid quercetin, abundant in bilberries, induce the fra-1 promoter and the cellular content of Fra-1 mRNA. We further provide evidence that this induction is mediated through EpREs.

Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus)

From: http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/life-science/nutrition-research/learning-center/plant-profiler/vaccinium-myrtillus.html

Synonyms / Common Names / Related Terms
Airelle, anthocyanins, Bickbeere (German), bilberry leaf, black whortle, Blaubeere (Dutch), blaubessen, bleaberry, blueberry, blueberry leaf, bogberry, bog bilberry, burren myrtle, cranberry, dwarf bilberry, dyeberry, Ericaceae (family), European blueberry, Heidelbeere (Dutch), Heidelbeereblatter, heidelberry, huckleberry, hurtleberry, lingonberry, lowbush blueberry, Mirtillo nero (Italian), Myrtilli folium, Myrtilli fructus, Myrtilus niger Gilib., Optiberry, resveratrol, sambubiosides, trackleberry, Vaccinium angulosum Dulac, Vaccinium montanum Salibs., Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanoside extract, VMA extract, VME, whortleberry, wineberry
Mechanism of Action

Pharmacology:

  • Constituents: Bilberry contains several compounds that have demonstrated biological activity. The main chemicals contained in bilberry extract have been shown to be: anthocyanins30,31, flavonoids, hydroquinone, oleanolic acid, neomyrtillin, sodium, tannins, and ursolic acid17,20,32,33,34. Bilberry also contains resveratrol.28,29 The anthocyanosides, tannins, and flavonoids have been of particular scientific interest. Flavonoids have been shown in vitro to possess a number of biological properties, including inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis, reduction of capillary permeability and fragility, free radical scavenging, inhibition of a wide range of enzymes, impairment of coagulation and platelet aggregation, and anticarcinogenicity.33,5
  • Mechanism of action: Anthocyanins and other phenolics from bilberry upregulate the oxidative stress defense enzymes heme-oxygenase-1 and glutathione S-transferase-pin cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells, suggesting that they stimulate signal transduction pathways, influencing genes controlled by the antioxidant response element.30
  • Antibacterial effects: In an in vitro study using Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus aureus Oxford, Enterococcus faecalisBacillus subtilis, and Escherichia coli, an aqueous extract of bilberry leaves had a MIC of 12.7-17.8mg/mL and an aqueous extract of bilberry fruit had a MIC of 15.4-30.7mg/mL.24
  • Anticarcinogenic effects: In an in vitro study, anthocyanin-rich extracts from bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) inhibited the growth of a colon cancer cell line.6
  • Bomser et al. screened fruit extracts of bilberry for potential anticarcinogenic compounds by a combination of fractionation and in vitro testing of their ability to induce the Phase 2 xenobiotic detoxification enzyme quinone reductase (QR) and to inhibit the induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, by the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA).5 The crude extracts, anthocyanin, and proanthocyanidin fractions were not found to be highly active in Phase 2 xenobiotic detoxification enzyme quinone reductase (QR) induction, whereas the ethyl acetate extracts were active QR inducers. The concentrations required to double QR activity (designated CDqr) for the ethyl acetate extracts of bilberry were 1.0mcg tannic acid equivalents (TAE). Further fractionation of the bilberry ethyl acetate extract revealed that the majority of inducer potency was contained in a hexane/chloroform subfraction (CDqr = 0.07mcg TAE). The anthocyanidin and ethyl acetate extracts of bilberry were either inactive or relatively weak inhibitors of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity. The authors concluded that components of the hexane/chloroform fraction of bilberry exhibit potential anticarcinogenic activity, as evaluated by in vitro screening tests.
  • Antihyperglycemic effects: In normal and depancreatized dogs, oral administration of bilberry leaves reduced hyperglycemia, even when the glucose was injected intravenously concurrently.15,16
  • Antioxidant effects: Bilberry contains anthocyanosides that are flavonoid derivatives of anthocyanins (the blue, red, or violet pigments found in many berry varieties), which are closely related in structure and activity to flavonoids17 and possess free radical scavenging/antioxidant properties. Antioxidant properties have been attributed to bilberry based on in vitro studies.1,2,34
  • Antiplatelet activity: In a clinical study of 30 subjects with normal platelet aggregation, 480mg of Myrtocyan® (Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanins) daily, 3g of ascorbic acid daily, or both treatments all reduced platelet aggregation after 30 and 60 days.11 Bilberry anthocyanins reduced platelet aggregation more than ascorbic acid alone, but bilberry anthocyanins and ascorbic acid together were the most effective. Also, in in vitro studies, anthocyanins extracted from bilberry have inhibited platelet aggregation.13,14,10,12
  • Flavonoids have been shown in vitro to inhibit prostacyclin synthesis. In one animal model, Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides were studied for their effects on prostacyclin-like activity in rat arterial issue.7
  • Antiproliferative effects: According to one laboratory study, anthocyanins were the predominant phenolic compounds in bilberry extracts.31 Compared to other plants with anthocyanins, such as black currant or lingonberry, cell growth inhibition was greater for bilberry than other plants studied. The pro-apoptosis marker, Bax, was increased 1.3-fold in bilberry-treated cells, whereas the pro-survival marker, Bcl-2, was detected only in control cells. The results demonstrated that bilberry and other berry extracts containing anthocyanins inhibited cancer cell proliferation, mainly via the p21WAF1 pathway.
  • Antiulcer effects: In an animal study, large doses of cyanidin chloride from bilberry significantly increased gastric mucosal release of prostaglandin E2.19 In animal models of gastric ulcers, cyanidin chloride showed antiulcer activity.26,8
  • Astringent effects: Bilberry contains tannins that have been used medicinally as astringents and to treat diarrhea.
  • Connective tissue stabilizing effects: An in vitro study has suggested that anthocyanosides appear to stabilize connective tissue by enhancing collagen synthesis, inhibiting collagen degradation, and enhancing collagen cross linking.35 In contrast, Boniface et al. found a significant decrease in connective tissue synthesis (collagen and glycoproteins) in gingival tissue samples of 12 adult diabetics treated with 600mg of anthocyanosides daily for two months.36
  • Hepatoprotective activity: In an animal study, anthocyans exerted a protective effect on liver cells.27
  • Hyperglycemic effects: In an oral glucose tolerance test in healthy rats, an alcoholic extract of Vaccinium myrtillus leaves increased serum glucose levels compared to controls.25
  • Hypotensive effects: Bilberry has been theorized to potentially drop blood pressure, based on pre-clinical evidence of vascular smooth muscle-relaxing properties.21,22,23
  • Anthocyanoside extracts have been shown to have smooth muscle-relaxing activity, which may account for their purported effects in one series of women with dysmenorrhea.18 Bioflavonoids and extracts of anthocyanosides (such as those present in bilberry) have been shown to relax vascular smooth muscles in experimental models, possibly via stimulation of prostaglandins.21,22,23
  • Intracellular signaling effects: Anthocyanosides have been shown to inhibit cAMP phosphodiesterase, which is involved in intracellular signal transduction pathways.8
  • Ocular effects: Anthocyanosides have been shown to exert direct effects on the retina, including the alteration of local enzymatic reactions and enhancement of the recovery of rhodopsin.9 The multi-ingredient product Mirtogenol (Pycnogenol® – French maritime pine bark extract and Mirtoselect® – standardized bilberry extract) has been reported to lower intraocular pressure and improve ocular blood flow.37
  • Smooth muscle relaxant effects: Anthocyanoside extracts have been shown to have smooth muscle-relaxing activity, which may account for their purported effects in one series of women with dysmenorrhea.18 Bioflavonoids and extracts of anthocyanosides (such as those present in bilberry) have been shown to relax vascular smooth muscles in experimental models, possibly via stimulation of prostaglandins.21,22,23
  • Vasoprotective effects: Flavonoids have been shown in vitro to reduce capillary permeability and fragility. Anthocyanosides have been studied for their potential protective effect in disorders due to abnormal capillary fragility.33

Pharmacodynamics/Kinetics:

  • There are limited data regarding the pharmacodynamics and kinetics of Vaccinium myrtillus (bilberry) anthocyanosides (VMA). In one animal study, bilberry anthocyanosides were rapidly distributed after intra-peritoneal injection and intravenous administration.38 In another animal study, bilberry anthocyanosides were found to be eliminated via the bile and urine with a modest level of liver extraction.32
  • Bioavailability in animals is low. Following oral doses in rats, plasma levels of VMA reached a peak at 15 minutes and declined rapidly within two hours, and the absolute bioavailability was 1.2% of the administered dose.38 The gastrointestinal absorption of VMA was 5% of the administered dose. Another study found a differential affinity of VMA for certain tissues (especially skin and kidney).20 This suggests that different tissues may have more persistent local concentrations.
References:

  1. Martin-Aragon S, Basabe B, Benedi JM, and et all. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant properties of Vaccinium myrtillus. Pharmaceutical Biology 1999;37(2):109-113.
  2. Prior R, Cao G, Martin A, and et all. Antioxidant capacity as influence by total phenolic and anthocyanin content, maturity, and variety of Vaccinium species. J Agricult Food Chem 1998;46:2686-2693.
  3. Martin-Aragon S, Basabe B, Benedi J, and et all. Antioxidant action of Vaccinium myrtillus L. Phytotherapy 1998;46:S104-S106.
  4. Laplaud, P. M., Lelubre, A., and Chapman, M. J. Antioxidant action of Vaccinium myrtillus extract on human low density lipoproteins in vitro: initial observations. Fundam Clin Pharmacol 1997;11(1):35-40. 9182074
  5. Bomser, J., Madhavi, D. L., Singletary, K., and Smith, M. A. In vitro anticancer activity of fruit extracts from Vaccinium species. Planta Med 1996;62(3):212-216.
  6. Zhao, C., Giusti, M. M., Malik, M., Moyer, M. P., and Magnuson, B. A. Effects of commercial anthocyanin-rich extracts on colonic cancer and nontumorigenic colonic cell growth. J Agric Food Chem  10-6-2004;52(20):6122-6128. 15453676
  7. Morazzoni P and Magistretti MJ. Effects of Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides on prostacyclin-like activity in rat arterial issue. Fitoterapia 1986;57:11-14.
  8. Magistretti, M. J., Conti, M., and Cristoni, A. Antiulcer activity of an anthocyanidin from Vaccinium myrtillus. Arzneimittelforschung  1988;38(5):686-690. 3415709
  9. Cluzel, C., Bastide, P., Wegman, R., and Tronche, P. [Enzymatic activities of retina and anthocyanoside extracts of Vaccinium myrtillus (lactate dehydrogenase, alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, 5-nucleotidase, phosphoglucose isomerase)]. Biochem Pharmacol 1970;19(7):2295-2302. 4329039
  10. Morazzoni P and Bombardelli E. Vaccinium myrtillus L. Fitoterapia 1996;66:3-29.
  11. Pulliero G, Montin S, Bettini V, and et al. Ex vivo study of the inhibitory effects of Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides on human platelet aggregation. Fitoterapia 1989;60:69-75.
  12. Bottecchia D. Preliminary report on the inhibitory effect of vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides on platelet aggregation and clot retraction. Fitoterapia 1987;48:3-8.
  13. Zaragoza, F., Iglesias, I., and Benedi, J. [Comparative study of the anti-aggregation effects of anthocyanosides and other agents]. Arch Farmacol Toxicol 1985;11(3):183-188. 4096552
  14. Fdez, M., Zaragoza, F., and Alvarez, P. In vitro platelet aggregation effects of anthocyanosides of vaccinium myrtilus L. Anales de la Real Academia de Farmacia 1983;49:79-90.
  15. Bever B. Plants with oral hypoglycemic action. Q J Crude Drugs Res 1979;17:139-196.
  16. Allen, F. M. Blueberry leaf extract: Physiologic and clinical properties in relation to carbohydrate metabolism. 89:1577-81, 1927. JAMA 1927;89:1577-1581.
  17. Havsteen, B. Flavonoids, a class of natural products of high pharmacological potency. Biochem Pharmacol 4-1-1983;32(7):1141-1148. 6342623
  18. Colombo D and Vescovini R. Controlled clinical trial of anthocyanosides from Vaccinium myrtillus in primary dysmenorrhea. G Ital Obstet Ginecol 1985;7:1033-1038.
  19. Mertz-Nielsen, A., Munck, L. K., Bukhave, K., and Rask-Madsen, J. A natural flavonoid, IdB 1027, increases gastric luminal release of prostaglandin E2 in healthy subjects. Ital J Gastroenterol  1990;22(5):288-290. 2134327
  20. Lietti, A., Cristoni, A., and Picci, M. Studies on Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides. I. Vasoprotective and antiinflammatory activity. Arzneimittelforschung 1976;26(5):829-832. 9100
  21. Colantuoni, A., Bertuglia, S., Magistretti, M. J., and Donato, L. Effects of Vaccinium Myrtillus anthocyanosides on arterial vasomotion. Arzneimittelforschung  1991;41(9):905-909. 1796918
  22. Bettini V. Effects of Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides on vascular smooth muscle. Fitoterapia 1984;55(5):265-272.
  23. Bettini V, Mayellaro F, Ton P, and et al. Interactions between Vaccinium myrtillusanthocyanosides and serotonin on splenic artery smooth muscle. Fitoterapia 1984;55(4):201-208.
  24. Brantner, A. and Grein, E. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts used externally in traditional medicine. J Ethnopharmacol 1994;44(1):35-40. 7990502
  25. Neef H, Declercq P, and Laekeman G. Hypoglycaemic activity of selected European plants. Phytotherapy Research 1995;9:45-48.
  26. Cristoni, A. and Magistretti, M. J. Antiulcer and healing activity of Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides. Farmaco [Prat] 1987;42(2):29-43. 3582621
  27. Mitcheva, M., Astroug, H., Drenska, D., Popov, A., and Kassarova, M. Biochemical and morphological studies on the effects of anthocyans and vitamin E on carbon tetrachloride induced liver injury. Cell Microbiol 1993;39(4):443-448. 8329983
  28. Lyons, M. M., Yu, C., Toma, R. B., Cho, S. Y., Reiboldt, W., Lee, J., and van Breemen, R. B. Resveratrol in raw and baked blueberries and bilberries. J Agric Food Chem  9-24-2003;51(20):5867-5870. 13129286
  29. Rimando, A. M., Kalt, W., Magee, J. B., Dewey, J., and Ballington, J. R. Resveratrol, pterostilbene, and piceatannol in vaccinium berries. J Agric Food Chem 7-28-2004;52(15):4713-4719. 15264904
  30. Milbury, P. E., Graf, B., Curran-Celentano, J. M., and Blumberg, J. B. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) anthocyanins modulate heme oxygenase-1 and glutathione S-transferase-pi expression in ARPE-19 cells. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2007;48(5):2343-2349. 17460300
  31. Wu, Q. K., Koponen, J. M., Mykkanen, H. M., and Torronen, A. R. Berry phenolic extracts modulate the expression of p21(WAF1) and Bax but not Bcl-2 in HT-29 colon cancer cells. J Agric Food Chem 2-21-2007;55(4):1156-1163. 17243699
  32. Lietti, A. and Forni, G. Studies on Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides. II. Aspects of anthocyanins pharmacokinetics in the rat. Arzneimittelforschung  1976;26(5):832-835. 989354
  33. Mian E. Anthocyanosides and microvessel walls: new findings on the mechanism of action of their protective effect in syndromes due to abnormal capillary fragility. Minerva Med 1977;68(52):3565-3581.
  34. Marcollet M, Bastide P, and Tronche P. Effet angio-protecteur des anthocyanosides de Vaccinium myrtillus odjective vis a vis de la liberation de la lactate deshydrogenase (LDH) et de ses isoenzymes cardiaques chez le rat soumis a une epreuve de nage. C R Soc Biol  1970;163:1786.
  35. Jonadet, M., Meunier, M. T., Bastide, J., and Bastide, P. [Anthocyanosides extracted from Vitis vinifera, Vaccinium myrtillus and Pinus maritimus. I. Elastase-inhibiting activities in vitro. II. Compared angioprotective activities in vivo]. J Pharm Belg 1983;38(1):41-46. 6553084
  36. Boniface, R. and Robert, A. M. [Effect of anthocyanins on human connective tissue metabolism in the human]. Klin Monatsbl Augenheilkd  1996;209(6):368-372. 9091714
  37. Steigerwalt, R. D., Gianni, B., Paolo, M., Bombardelli, E., Burki, C., and Schonlau, F. Effects of Mirtogenol on ocular blood flow and intraocular hypertension in asymptomatic subjects. Mol Vis  2008;14:1288-1292. 18618008
  38. Morazzoni, P., Livio, S., Scilingo, A., and Malandrino, S. Vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides pharmacokinetics in rats. Arzneimittelforschung  1991;41(2):128-131. 2043174

BLUEBERRY & BILBERRY SUMMARY

Wild bilberries and wild blueberries are important fruits full of polyphenols, anthocyanins, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators that help to make Ultimate Protector+ such an outstanding nutritional supplement.

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ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ INGREDIENTS – APPLE

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD biography about us HPDI integratedhealth formulator founder CEO scientist physicist wild bilberry and wild blueberry Ultimate Protector+ includes apple extract, as well as extracts from 12 different fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Each of these ingredients contain substances considered to be polyphenols, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators. In this article, I explore the ingredient apple (Malus pumila mill.) extract, which is a component of SFB® – Standardized Fruit Blend from Ethical Naturals, Inc.

apple extract

Ultimate Protector+ Includes Apple

SFB® is a proprietary formula that combines extracts from Grape, Cranberry, Pomegranate, Blueberry, Apple, Mangosteen, Bilberry, Chokeberry, and Goji Berry. It is high in fruit polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, catechins, proanthocyanins, ellagic acid, xanthines, chlorogenic acid, pterostilbenes, resveratrol, phloridzin, quercetin, zeaxanthin, and quinic acid. With its diverse blend, SFB® offers over 40-50% polyphenols as well as >9,000 ORAC units in a single gram.

Polyphenols, anthocyanins and other plant elements are powerful ingredients associated with a variety of areas of human health, including healthy aging, healthy glucose metabolism, cardiovascular health, and inflammation management.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF APPLE

The Apple extract in Ultimate Protector+ has been extracted with non-GMO food grade ethanol and distilled water. Testing has indicated the product contains over 40% polyphenols. In numerous epidemiological studies, apples have been associated with a decreased risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and asthma.

When compared to many other commonly consumed fruits in the United States, apples had the second highest level of antioxidant activity. Apples also ranked the second for total concentration of phenolic compounds, and perhaps more importantly, apples had the highest portion of free phenolics when compared to other fruits.

APPLE PHYTOCHEMICALS

Apples contain a large concentration of flavonoids, as well as a variety of other phytochemicals, and the concentration of these phytochemicals may depend on many factors, such as cultivar of the apple, harvest and storage of the apples, and processing of the apples. The concentration of phytochemicals also varies greatly between the apple peels and the apple flesh.

Some of the most well studied antioxidant compounds in apples include quercetin-3-galactoside, quercetin-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-rhamnoside, catechin, epicatechin, procyanidin, cyanidin-3-galactoside, coumaric acid, chlorogenic acid, gallic acid, and phloridzin. Recently researchers have examined the average concentrations of the major phenolic compounds in six cultivars of apples. They found that the average phenolic concentrations among the six cultivars were: quercetin glycosides, 13.2 mg/100 g fruit; vitamin C, 12.8 mg/100 g fruit; procyanidin B, 9.35 mg/100 g fruit; chlorogenic acid, 9.02 mg/100 g fruit; epicatechin, 8.65 mg/100 g fruit; and phloretin glycosides, 5.59 mg/100 g fruit.

The compounds most commonly found in apple peels consist of the procyanidins, catechin, epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, phloridzin, and the quercetin conjugates. In the apple flesh, there is some catechin, procyanidin, epicatechin, and phloridzin, but these compounds are found in much lower concentrations than in the peels. Quercetin conjugates are found exclusively in the peel of the apples. Chlorogenic acid tends to be higher in the flesh than in the peel.

Because the apple peels contain more antioxidant compounds, especially quercetin, apple peels may have higher antioxidant activity and higher bioactivity than the apple flesh. Research showed that apples without the peels had less antioxidant activity than apples with the peels. Apples with the peels were also better able to inhibit cancer cell proliferation when compared to apples without the peels. More recent work has shown that apple peels contain anywhere from two to six times (depending on the variety) more phenolic compounds than in the flesh, and two to three times more flavonoids in the peels when compared to the flesh. The antioxidant activity of these peels was also much greater, ranging from two to six times greater in the peels when compared to the flesh, depending on the variety of the apple. This work is supported a study which found that rats consuming apple peels showed greater inhibition of lipid peroxidation and greater plasma antioxidant capacity when compared to rats fed apple flesh.

Many of these phytochemicals from apples have been widely studied, and many potential health benefits have been attributed to these specific phytochemicals. The procyanidins, epicatechin and catechin, have strong antioxidant activity and have been found to inhibit low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in vitro. In mice, catechin inhibits intestinal tumor formation and delays tumors onset. One  study found that chlorogenic acid has very high alkyl peroxyl radical (ROO•) scavenging activity. Compared to about 18 other antioxidant compounds (including quercetin, gallic acid, α-tocopherol), chlorogenic was second only to rutin. Since ROO• may enhance tumor promotion and carcinogenesis, chlorogenic acid may add to the protective effect of apples against cancer. Chlorogenic acid has been found to inhibit 8-dehydroxy-deoxyguanosine formation in cellular DNA in a rat model following treatment with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide.

Quercetin is also a strong antioxidant, and is thought to have potential protective effects against both cancer and heart disease. Briefly, quercetin has been found to down regulate expression of mutant p53 in breast cancer cells, arrest human leukemic T-cells in G1, inhibit tyrosine kinase, and inhibit heat shock proteins. Quercetin has protected Caco-2 cells from lipid peroxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide and Fe2+. In mice liver treated with ethanol, quercetin decreased lipid oxidation and increased glutathione, protecting the liver from oxidative damage. Recently, it has been found that high doses of quercetin inhibit cell proliferation in colon carcinoma cell lines and in mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines, but at low doses quercetin increased cell proliferation (20% in colon cancer cells and 100% in breast cancer cells). However, low doses of quercetin (10 uM) inhibited cell proliferation in Mol-4 Human Leukemia cells and also induced apoptosis. Quercetin inhibited intestinal tumor growth in mice, but not in rats. Low levels of quercetin inhibited platelet aggregation, calcium mobilization, and tyrosine protein phosphorylation in platelets. Modulation of platelet activity may help prevent cardiovascular disease.

SCIENTIFIC STUDIES ON THE ANTIOXIDANT EFFECTS OF APPLE

Below, I provide relevant scientific studies on the antioxidant effects and potential health benefits of apple.

Apple phytochemicals and their health benefits

Jeanelle Boyer1 and Rui Hai Liu1

Abstract

Evidence suggests that a diet high in fruits and vegetables may decrease the risk of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, and phytochemicals including phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids from fruits and vegetables may play a key role in reducing chronic disease risk. Apples are a widely consumed, rich source of phytochemicals, and epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of apples with reduced risk of some cancers, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and diabetes. In the laboratory, apples have been found to have very strong antioxidant activity, inhibit cancer cell proliferation, decrease lipid oxidation, and lower cholesterol. Apples contain a variety of phytochemicals, including quercetin, catechin, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid, all of which are strong antioxidants. The phytochemical composition of apples varies greatly between different varieties of apples, and there are also small changes in phytochemicals during the maturation and ripening of the fruit. Storage has little to no effect on apple phytochemicals, but processing can greatly affect apple phytochemicals. While extensive research exists, a literature review of the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals has not been compiled to summarize this work. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature regarding the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals, phytochemical bioavailability and antioxidant behavior, and the effects of variety, ripening, storage and processing on apple phytochemicals..

Cancer chemopreventive potential of apples, apple juice, and apple components.

 Gerhauser C1.

From: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18855307

Abstract

Apples ( MALUS sp., Rosaceae) are a rich source of nutrient as well as non-nutrient components and contain high levels of polyphenols and other phytochemicals. Main structural classes of apple constituents include hydroxycinnamic acids, dihydrochalcones, flavonols (quercetin glycosides), catechins and oligomeric procyanidins, as well as triterpenoids in apple peel and anthocyanins in red apples. Several lines of evidence suggest that apples and apple products possess a wide range of biological activities which may contribute to health beneficial effects against cardiovascular disease, asthma and pulmonary dysfunction, diabetes, obesity, and cancer (reviewed by Boyer and Liu, Nutr J 2004). The present review will summarize the current knowledge on potential cancer preventive effects of apples, apple juice and apple extracts (jointly designated as apple products). In brief, apple extracts and components, especially oligomeric procyanidins, have been shown to influence multiple mechanisms relevant for cancer prevention in IN VITRO studies. These include antimutagenic activity, modulation of carcinogen metabolism, antioxidant activity, anti-inflammatory mechanisms, modulation of signal transduction pathways, antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activity, as well as novel mechanisms on epigenetic events and innate immunity. Apple products have been shown to prevent skin, mammary and colon carcinogenesis in animal models. Epidemiological observations indicate that regular consumption of one or more apples a day may reduce the risk for lung and colon cancer.

Apple Peel Polyphenols and Their Beneficial Actions on Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

. 2013; 8(1): e53725.
Marie Claude Denis, Alexandra Furtos, Stéphanie Dudonné, Alain Montoudis, Carole Garofalo, Yves Desjardins, Edgard Delvin, and Emile Levy
From: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3553108/#

Abstract

Since gastrointestinal mucosa is constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species from various sources, the presence of antioxidants may contribute to the body’s natural defenses against inflammatory diseases.

Hypothesis

To define the polyphenols extracted from dried apple peels (DAPP) and determine their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential in the intestine. Caco-2/15 cells were used to study the role of DAPP preventive actions against oxidative stress (OxS) and inflammation induced by iron-ascorbate (Fe/Asc) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), respectively.

Results

The combination of HPLC with fluorescence detection, HPLC-ESI-MS TOF and UPLC-ESI-MS/MS QQQ allowed us to characterize the phenolic compounds present in the DAPP (phenolic acids, flavonol glycosides, flavan-3-ols, procyanidins). The addition of Fe/Asc to Caco-2/15 cells induced OxS as demonstrated by the rise in malondialdehyde, depletion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and alterations in the activity of endogenous antioxidants (SOD, GPx, G-Red). However, preincubation with DAPP prevented Fe/Asc-mediated lipid peroxidation and counteracted LPS-mediated inflammation as evidenced by the down-regulation of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and prostaglandin E2. The mechanisms of action triggered by DAPP induced also a down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 and nuclear factor-κB, respectively. These actions were accompanied by the induction of Nrf2 (orchestrating cellular antioxidant defenses and maintaining redox homeostasis), and PGC-1α (the “master controller” of mitochondrial biogenesis).

Conclusion

Our findings provide evidence of the capacity of DAPP to reduce OxS and inflammation, two pivotal processes involved in inflammatory bowel diseases.

APPLE SUMMARY

Apple is an important fruit full of polyphenols, anthocyanins, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators that help to make Ultimate Protector+ such an outstanding nutritional supplement.