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ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ BRUNSWICK LABS ORAC6.0 TEST REPORT

Dr. Hank Liers, PhDHPDI’s new product ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ is a next generation cell protection formula that simultaneously meets the needs for high levels of Vitamin C, full spectrum antioxidants (high ORAC values), and protective enzyme activators (Nrf2 activators from plant-based polyphenols) in a single product. This potent combination of characteristics distinguishes the formula because no other single product available today offers such complete protection.

All three of ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+‘s components provide significant protection against the various types of free radicals that cause cellular damage in the body. In particular, the full spectrum of antioxidants derived from high ORAC fruits, vegetables, and herbs (as well as Vitamin C) provide extremely powerful exogenous sources of protection against oxidative stress. To obtain a quantitative measure of just how powerful these external sources are we have elected to conduct ORAC testing.

ORAC TESTS

ORAC (standing for “Oxygen Radical Absorption Capacity”) was developed by Brunswick Labs as an analytical tool for estimating the antioxidant capacity of substances. It is an in vitro test that was an important advancement in commercially available analysis of the peroxyl free-radical’s trapping ability of foods and ingredients. It has become a de facto standard in the natural products industry. However, the original ORAC method was considered to be just a starting point for comprehensive antioxidant analysis.

The fact is that there are a variety of “free radicals” that operate in humans — the most important of which are the primary radicals hydroxyl, peroxyl, peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, and superoxide anion. Brunswick Labs has reported that even though the peroxyl is the major free radical in the body, it represents no more than 27% of the total antioxidant potential of selected fruits and vegetables. In addition, the original ORAC method favors certain antioxidant substances over others (e.g., anthocyanins over carotenoids) due to the use of a single free radical source (peroxyl radical).

These radicals are formed, behave, and are defended against differently. They all contribute to: 1) a general condition called “oxidative stress,” or cellular damage, and 2) broad human health concerns caused, for example, by inflammation, and DNA and protein damage. They are each implicated in different health problems – from cardiovascular disease to macular degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease and to skin damage and aging. Below we provide a brief summary of these free radicals.

The Peroxyl Radical is very important in many biological systems, including lipid peroxidation, DNA cleavage, and protein backbone modification. Hydroxyl is highly reactive and cannot be eliminated by our endogenous enzymes (such as SOD and glutathione). It can damage virtually all types of macromolecules: carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and amino acids. In the skin, hydroxyl radicals are created by UV exposure. Peroxynitrite is a reactive nitrogen species that is particularly harmful to proteins. It has been implicated in the development of certain cancers, hepatitis, and chronic inflammation. In the skin, peroxynitrite contributes to the breakdown of vital proteins, such as collagen.

Singlet Oxygen is generated in the skin by by UV. In vivo, it is linked to the oxidation of LDL cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. Singlet oxygen is highly unstable and durable. Carotenoids are very effective at scavenging singlet oxygen. Superoxide Anion is a precursor of all other reactive oxygen species and sometimes is referred to as “the mother of free radicals.” It is highly toxic and contributes to lipid and DNA damage. Antioxidants that scavenge superoxide anion also help prevent the formation of radicals such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl. Superoxide anion has been linked to hypertension and cardiovascular damage.

Recently, Brunswick Labs has introduced a new test called ORAC6.0. This test expands the ORAC platform to measure the antioxidant capacity against each of the five primary reactive oxygen species mentioned above as well as Hypochlorite (HOCl) which is another important free radical that is commonly found in the body as a by-product of the metabolism of other free radicals. Direct reaction of HOCl with plasmid DNA gives rise to single- and double-strand breaks via chloramine-mediated reactions. ORAC6.0 substantially improves broad-spectrum antioxidant analysis and gives evidence of the diverse antioxidant potential of natural products against radicals other than just peroxyl.  Brunswick Labs’ research shows that the antioxidants found in a wide range of natural products are effective against these primary radicals, and that in many cases a preponderance of a product’s antioxidant capacity is described by performance against the six free radicals included to the ORAC6.0 panel.

RESULTS OF ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ ORAC6.0 TEST

Recently [August/2019] Brunswick Labs has tested ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ using the new ORAC6.0 tests. The results reveal an incredible overall ORAC6.0 value of 272,743 µmole TE/gram (i.e., 272,743 per gram!). In addition, the results show that the formula offers excellent protection against all of the six types of free radicals. Specifically, the results show values of 3,376 µmole TE/gram for peroxyl radicals, 5,569 µmole TE/gram for hydroxyl radicals, 2,758 µmole TE/gram for peroxynitrite radicals, 221,866 µmole TE/gram for superoxide anion radicals, 34,169 µmole TE/gram for singlet oxygen radicals, and 5,005 µmole TE/gram for hypochlorite radicals. The table (below) shows for each free radical type the ORAC6.0 daily values for six capsules of ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ containing 3.55 grams of the formula.

The overall daily ORAC6.0™ value for six capsules  obtained by adding the values for each free radical type is 968,237 units (272,743 units x 3.55 g)! To the best of our knowledge there is no other product that even comes close to providing such complete protection both in terms of breadth of coverage and overall strength. The Brunswick Labs ORAC6.0™ test results for ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ are posted on our blog.


Ultimate Protector+ nrf2 activator formula

 

The bottom line is that you (or anyone) can stand to benefit dramatically from an advanced antioxidant formula that provides exceedingly high ORAC6.0 values and hence amazingly high cell protection…with just a modest daily dose of six small capsules. If you are at all interested to see how well this formula can protect your heath, then we suggest you try a bottle. See for yourself how ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ acts to provide you with the ultimate level of protection against free radicals. It’s 100% guaranteed.

ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+™ ORAC6.0 Units Per Serving (six capsules)

ORAC6.0 Units
Per Serving*

Free Radical Type
11,985 Peroxyl Radical is very important in many biological systems, including lipid peroxidation, DNA cleavage, and protein backbone modification.
19,770 Hydroxyl is highly reactive and cannot be eliminated by our endogenous enzymes. It damages virtually all types of macromolecules: carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and amino acids. In the skin, hydroxyl radicals are created by UV exposure.
9,791 Peroxynitrite is a reactive nitrogen species that is particularly harmful to proteins. It has been implicated in the development of certain cancers, hepatitis, and chronic inflammation. In the skin, peroxynitrite contributes to the breakdown of vital proteins, such as collagen.
121,300 Singlet Oxygen is generated in the skin by UV exposure. It is linked to the oxidation of LDL cholesterol and cardiovascular disease.
787,624 Superoxide Anion is a precursor of all other reactive oxygen species – sometimes referred to as “the mother of free radicals.” It is highly toxic and contributes to lipid and DNA damage.

17,768

Hypochlorite HOCl – direct reaction of HOCl with plasmid DNA gives rise to single- and double-strand breaks via chloramine-mediated reactions.

968,237

Total ORAC6.0 Per Daily Serving of Six Capsules (3.55 g)

View the Brunswick Labs Ultimate Protector™ ORAC6.0 Test Report Here

 

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ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ NRF2 ACTIVATOR FORMULA – NEW DESIGN!

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD ultimate protector+ antioxidant Nrf2 activator formulaToday I discuss HPDI’s newly updated Ultimate Protector+ antioxidant, cell protection, and Nrf2 activator formula. I first formulated Ultimate Protector in 2012 after I learning about plant-based Nrf2 activators.

My original idea behind developing Ultimate Protector was to unite three design elements in a single formula preventing and ameliorating free-radical damage in the body. I recently updated Ultimate Protector (now Ultimate Protector+) based on availability of improved ingredients and additional research studies on Nrf2 activators.

ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ ADVANCED CELL PROTECTION & NRF2 ACTIVATOR FORMULA

The three design elements include: 1) non-GMO Vitamin C, 2) high ORAC5.0 antioxidants, and 3) multiple plant-based Nrf2 activators. Nrf2 activators cause release of #Nrf2 proteins that are bound in every call of the body. Once released they migrate to the cell nucleus where they cause genetic transcription of antioxidant enzymes that can neutralize excess free-radicals in the body.

ELEMENTS OF ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ FORMULA

1 – NON-GMO VITAMIN C

The new Ultimate Protector+ includes the same amount of Vitamin C as before—owing to its ability to rapidly reduce superoxide and nitroxide radicals, and scavenge hydroxyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals. Vitamin C also reacts with non-radical species like singlet oxygen and hypochlorous acid. Vitamin C ‘recycles’ other antioxidants (in its role as electron donor) and allows them to quench more free radicals. Vitamin C itself was recently shown to be a Nrf2 activator.

2 – HIGH-ORAC5.0 VALUE INGREDIENTS

By means of carefully choosing plant ingredients with the highest ORAC 5.0 values, the product can neutralize all five major types of free radicals commonly found in the body, including: 1) peroxyl, 2) hydroxyl, 3) peroxynitrite, 4) singlet oxygen, and 5) superoxide anion. Ultimate Protector+ includes many plant-based ingredients with high ORAC5.0 values. These include green tea extract, whole grape extract, curcumin, resveratrol, bilberry, and mangosteen.

ultimate protector+ nrf2 activator formula uses three modes of action

Ultimate Protector utilizes three modes of action

3 – POTENT NRF2 ACTIVATORS

The science on Nrf2 activators clearly shows a wide variety of plant polyphenols act endogenously to cause genetic transcription of many protective enzymes, like superoxide dismutase, glutathione transferase, and heme oxygenase. Many well-known, well-researched Nrf2 activators are high ORAC5.0 #antioxidants. These first act as antioxidants giving up an electron, and then act as weak pro-oxidants needed to stimulate Nrf2 activity. In Ultimate Protector+ these ingredients include green tea extract, whole grape extract, curcumin, resveratrol, bilberry, and mangosteen. In addition, ingredients such as extracts of apple, blueberry, cranberry, pomegranate, blueberry, apple, chokeberry, and goji berry are shown in studies to be important Nrf2 activators.

Ultimate Protector+ is available from HPDI: ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+
(http://www.integratedhealth.com/ultimate-protector.html)

12 plant-based Nrf2 activators

ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ RESOURCES

Ultimate Protector+: http://www.integratedhealth.com/ultimate-protector.html

BLOG ARTICLES

Amazing Healing Potential of Natural Nrf2 Activators:
http://www.integratedhealthblog.com/amazing-healing-potential-natural-nrf2-activators/

Preventing Free Radical Damage with Ultimate Protector+:
http://www.integratedhealthblog.com/amazing-healing-potential-natural-nrf2-activators/

Ultimate Protector+ Design Considerations: http://www.integratedhealthblog.com/scientific-basis-ultimate-protector/

Natural Phytochemical Nrf2 Activators for Chemoprevention:
http://www.integratedhealthblog.com/natural-phytochemical-nrf2-activators-for-chemoprevention/

New Directions For Preventing Free Radical Damage:
http://www.integratedhealthblog.com/new-directions-for-preventing-free-radical-damage/

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ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ INGREDIENTS – CHOKEBERRY (ARONIA)

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD aronia (chokeberry) nrf2 ultimate protectorUltimate Protector+ contains chokeberry (aronia), as well as components from 12+ different fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Each of these ingredients contain substances that may be considered to be polyphenols, antioxidants and Nrf2 activators. In this article, I explore the ingredient chokeberry (aronia) which is a component of SFB® Standardized Fruit Blend from Ethical Naturals, Inc.

Ultimate Protector+ Includes Chokeberry

Ultimate Protector+ Includes Chokeberry

SFB® is a proprietary formula that combines extracts from Grape, Cranberry, Pomegranate, Blueberry, Apple, Mangosteen, Bilberry, Chokeberry, and Goji Berry. It is high in fruit polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, catechins, proanthocyanins, ellagic acid, xanthines, chlorogenic acid, pterostilbenes, resveratrol, phloridzin, quercetin, zeaxanthin, carotinoids, polysaccharides, quinic acid, and more. With its diverse blend, SFB® offers over 40-50% polyphenols as well as >9,000 ORAC units in a single gram.

Polyphenols, anthocyanins, and other plant elements are powerful ingredients associated with a variety of areas of human health, including healthy aging, healthy glucose metabolism, cardiovascular health, and inflammation management.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF CHOKEBERRY (ARONIA)

Aronia melanocarpa (black chokeberry) has attracted scientific interest due to its deep purple, almost black pigmentation that arises from dense contents of polyphenols, especially anthocyanins. Total polyphenol content is 1752 mg per 100 g in fresh berries, anthocyanin content is 1480 mg per 100 g, and proanthocyanidin concentration is 664 mg per 100 g. These values are among the highest measured in plants to date.

The plant produces these pigments mainly in the leaves and skin of the berries to protect the pulp and seeds from constant exposure to ultraviolet radiation and production of free radicals. By absorbing UV rays in the blue-purple spectrum, leaf and skin pigments filter intense sunlight, serve antioxidant functions and thereby have a role assuring regeneration of the species.

Analysis of polyphenols in chokeberries has identified the following individual chemicals (among hundreds known to exist in the plant kingdom): cyanidin-3-galactoside, cyanidin-3-arabinoside, quercetin-3-glycoside, epicatechin, caffeic acid, delphinidin, petunidin, pelargonidin, peonidin, and malvidin. All these except caffeic acid are members of the flavonoid category of phenolics.

In a standard measurement of antioxidant strength, the oxygen radical absorbance capacity or ORAC, demonstrates aronia to have one of the highest values yet recorded for a fruit — 16,062 micromoles of Trolox Eq. per 100 g. The components contributing to this high measurement were both anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins, with the proanthocyanidin level “among the highest in foods,” which may explain their potent, astringent taste.

Below we provide information from several research articles that highlight some of the potential health effects of Aronia (Chokeberry)

CHOKEBERRY STUDIES

Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa)
A Review on the Characteristic Components and Potential Health Effects

From: https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/html/10.1055/s-0028-1088306

Abstract

The intention of this review is to contribute to a better understanding of the potentials of the nutritional contribution of Aronia berries (Aronia melanocarpa). The paper gives a short background to their botanical classification and cultivation practice, going in detail to describe the chemical composition of the berries. The emphasis is laid thereby upon the phenolic constituents. The paper finally gives a short resume of their beneficial effects in biological systems in vitro, in animals, and in humans, thus underlining their medicinal potential.

Antioxidant Effect

Aronia (Chokeberry)

Black Aronia (Chokeberry)

A few reports also describe an antioxidant effect in an animal model, where chokeberry anthocyanins decrease lipid peroxidation and enhance the activity of enzymes which are involved in the antioxidant defense system. One further study noted that the red pigment fraction of chokeberry fruits composed of cyanidin derivatives is a potent scavenger of DPPH radicals in both in vitro and in vivo systems and is able to prevent in a dose-dependent manner gastric mucosal damage that was induced by the subsequent application of ethanol. The authors suggested that one of the mechanisms by which the extract suppresses the development of the gastric mucosal damage is the scavenging of active oxygen by its cyanidin derivatives since the suppression of gastric acid secretion was not observed. An antioxidant effect was also found in humans, where a dietary supplementation with chokeberry juice limits the exercise-induced oxidative damage to red blood cells in rowers.

Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation

Many reports suggest anti-proliferative or protective effects of chokeberries and/or chokeberry extracts against colon cancer on the basis of in vitro studies and in one animal study. An anthocyanin-rich extract from Aronia melanocarpa was shown to inhibit the growth as well as to stimulate apoptosis of human HT-29 colon cancer cells but exerted only little effect on the growth of non-transformed NCM460 colonic cells. Interestingly, the chokeberry extract inhibited the growth to a greater extent than grape and bilberry anthocyanin-rich extracts when inhibition was compared at similar concentrations of monomeric anthocyanin. Another study demonstrated that the exposure to chokeberry juice inhibited Caco-2 cell proliferation by causing G2/M cell cycle arrest. Gene expression analysis revealed that the tumour suppressor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), whose expression is known to be reduced in the majority of early adenomas and carcinomas, was up-regulated in the Caco-2 cells following repetitive exposure to dietary levels of chokeberry juice. The anticarcinogenic potential was further supported by data from an animal study using male rats treated with the colon carcinogen azoxymethane. An anthocyanin-rich extract from chokeberry inhibited the formation of the azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci, a tentative marker of dysplasia and malignant transformation, and decreased the colonic epithelial cell proliferation rate as well as the faecal bile acid concentration. The data go in line with recent studies reporting that isolated cyanidin 3-O-glucoside exhibits chemopreventive activities.

Antimutagenic effects

Phenolic compounds isolated from berries of Aronia melanocarpa also exert an antimutagenic activity. Anthocyanins isolated from aronia (chokeberry) markedly inhibited the mutagenic activity of benzo[a]pyrene and 2-aminofluorene in the Ames test as well as in the sister chromatid exchange assay with cultured human lymphocytes. Furthermore, aronia juice intake was shown to inhibit the endogenous generation of N-nitrosamines in rats treated with aminopyrin plus sodium nitrite. In consequence, histopathological changes observed in livers of rats fed with nitrosamine precursors were prevented by co-treatment with aronia juice.

Hepatoprotective effects

In an animal study, anthocyanins from aronia (chokeberry) decreased the toxicity and accumulation of cadmium in the liver and kidney of rats receiving both these components in their diet. It may testify to the possibility of anthocyanins chelating metal ions which in consequence may decrease the damages caused by cadmium. Interestingly, a hepatoprotective effect of aronia juice was also observed in rats after acute exposure to carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). The liver cytotoxicity from CCl4 is dependent upon its metabolism by cytochrome P450 to highly reactive trichloromethyl free radicals. The reaction of the CCl3 radical with oxygen initiates lipid peroxidation which results ultimately in the cell death. Aronia (chokeberry) juice prevented the CCl4-induced increase of lipid peroxidation as measured by the malonodialdehyde content in rat liver and plasma. One might conclude that the ability of anthocyanins and/or other phenolic constituents to scavenge free radicals is mainly responsible for the observed effect.

Cardioprotective effects

Aronia (chokeberry) can positively influence several risk factors for cardiovascular disease. In vitroexperiments demonstrate that the phenolic constituents contribute to the protection and restoration of endothelial cells and consequently to their function. Furthermore anti-platelet effects, as well as vasoactive and vasoprotective properties in porcine coronary arteries were observed. In an experimental model of hyperlipidaemia in rats aronia fruit juice hindered the dietary-induced elevation of plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and plasma lipids. In men with a mild hypercholesterolaemia regular aronia (chokeberry) juice drinking (250 mL per day) for six weeks resulted in a significant decrease in serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and trigylceride level whereas the HDL2 cholesterol level was increased. Furthermore a moderate but significant decrease in serum glucose, homocysteine and fibrinogen concentration was noted. The metabolic changes were associated with a reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure by a mean of 13 and 7 mm Hg, respectively. A similar hypotensive effect of a flavonoid-rich extract from chokeberry fruits was lately observed in patients after myocardial infarction, treated simultaneously with statins and in patients with diabetes mellitus type II. Other effects studied include enhanced reduction in cardiovascular risk markers in patients after myocardial infarction suggesting a possible clinical use for secondary prevention of isachaemic heart diesease.

Antidiabetes effects

Research of other authors has demonstrated that Aronia melanocarpa anthocyanins might be useful in the prevention and control of diabetes mellitus type II and diabetes-associated complications. In an animal model the administration of aronia (chokeberry) fruit juice to diabetic rats appeared to attenuate hyperglycaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia. In a human intervention study the daily intake of 200 mL aronia (chokeberry) juice over a period of 3 months was effective in lowering fasting glucose levels in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes. Furthermore aronia (chokeberry) juice showed a beneficial effect on HbA1c-glycosylated haemoglobin, total cholesterol and lipid levels. These findings go in line with reports showing an effect of other procyanidin-rich foods on diabetes. Recent human studies also document that aronia (chokeberry) juice may be useful in in the treatment of obesity disorders.

Conclusions

In conclusion, aronia (chokeberry) (Aronia melanocarpa), a lesser known berry fruit, is one of the richest plant sources of highly interesting phenolic phytochemicals including procyanidins and anthocyanins. The high content as well as the pattern of the phenolic constituents seems to be responsible for the wide range of its potential medicinal and therapeutic effects. Further studies are needed to understand the beneficial effects reported so far also from the mechanistic point of view. However, it seems desirable that the spread and popularity of aronia (chokeberry) food products in the future will increase and expand consumers’ choice for healthy berry fruits.

Protective effect of chokeberry on chemical-induced oxidative stress in rat.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20488852

Hum Exp Toxicol. 2011 Mar;30(3):199-208. doi: 10.1177/0960327110371697. Epub 2010 May 20. Kujawska M1, Ignatowicz E, Ewertowska M, Oszmiański J, Jodynis-Liebert J.

Abstract

Male Wistar rats were treated with chokeberry juice per os, 10 mL/kg/day, for 28 days and a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), 150 mg/kg, or carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)), 2 ml/kg. The level of hepatic microsomal lipid peroxidation, expressed as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), was increased in animals dosed with NDEA and CCl(4). Juice pretreatment resulted in a significant decrease in TBARS by 53% and 92%, respectively. In rats administered juice alone, 50% decrease in TBARS was noted. The activities of all antioxidant enzymes were decreased in the liver of rats administered either toxicant by 29%-52% as compared to controls. Juice pretreatment resulted in an increase in the activity of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase by 117%, 56% and 44%, respectively, only in rats challenged with NDEA. Although no response of plasma protein carbonyls to both toxicants was observed, the pretreatment with juice caused a 55% decrease of this parameter in CCl(4)-dosed rats. DNA damage in blood leukocytes induced by either toxicant was slightly reduced, by 24%, in the rats pretreated with juice and administered NDEA. The results of the study showed that pretreatment with chokeberry juice confers some protection against chemical-induced oxidative stress.

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 912769, 8 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/912769

The Involvement of a Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Black Chokeberry in Oxidative Stress on Experimental Arterial Hypertension

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3600185/

Manuela Ciocoiu, Laurentiu Badescu, Anca Miron, and Magda Badescu

Abstract

The aim of this study is to characterize the content of Aronia melanocarpa Elliott (black chokeberry) extract and also to estimate the influence of polyphenolic compounds contained in chokeberries on oxidative stress, on an L-NAME-induced experimental model of arterial hypertension. The rat blood pressure values were recorded using a CODA Noninvasive Blood Pressure System. HPLC/DAD coupled with ElectroSpray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry allowed identification of five phenolic compounds in berries ethanolic extract as follows: chlorogenic acid, kuromanin, rutin, hyperoside, and quercetin. The serous activity of glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) has significantly lower values in the hypertensive (AHT) group as compared to the group protected by polyphenols (AHT + P). The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) values are lower in the AHT group and they are significantly higher in the AHT + P group. All the measured blood pressure components revealed a biostatistically significant blood pressure drop between the AHT group and the AHT + P group. The results reveal the normalization of the reduced glutathion (GSH) concentration as well as a considerable reduction in the malondialdehyde (MDA) serum concentration in the AHT + P group. Ethanolic extract of black chokeberry fruits not only has a potential value as a prophylactic agent but also may function as a nutritional supplement in the management of arterial hypertension.

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 912769, 8 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/912769

Extracts, anthocyanins and procyanidins from Aronia melanocarpa as radical scavengers and enzyme inhibitors.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23459328

Bräunlich M1, Slimestad R, Wangensteen H, Brede C, Malterud KE, Barsett H.

Abstract

Extracts, subfractions, isolated anthocyanins and isolated procyanidins B2, B5 and C1 from the berries and bark of Aronia melanocarpa were investigated for their antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities. Four different bioassays were used, namely scavenging of the diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, inhibition of 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO), inhibition of xanthine oxidase (XO) and inhibition of α-glucosidase. Among the anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-arabinoside possessed the strongest and cyanidin 3-xyloside the weakest radical scavenging and enzyme inhibitory activity. These effects seem to be influenced by the sugar units linked to the anthocyanidin. Subfractions enriched in procyanidins were found to be potent α-glucosidase inhibitors; they possessed high radical scavenging properties, strong inhibitory activity towards 15-LO and moderate inhibitory activity towards XO. Trimeric procyanidin C1 showed higher activity in the biological assays compared to the dimeric procyanidins B2 and B5. This study suggests that different polyphenolic compounds of A. melanocarpa can have beneficial effects in reducing blood glucose levels due to inhibition of α-glucosidase and may have a potential to alleviate oxidative stress.

Nutrients. 2013 Mar 4;5(3):663-78. doi: 10.3390/nu5030663.

Aronia (Chokeberry) Tea

Aronia (Chokeberry) makes a nice tea.

CHOKEBERRY SUMMARY

Chokeberry (Aronia) is an exciting fruit full of important polyphenols, antioxidants and Nrf2 activators that help to make Ultimate Protector+ such an outstanding nutritional supplement. This ingredient is becoming much more well known as research studies identify its many benefits. Recently, I was happy to find that the Knudsen “Just Fruit” brand has introduced “Just Aronia”. Try it!!!

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PRO-C AND ULTIMATE PROTECTOR – COMPARISON OF ANTIOXIDANT FORMULAS

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD antioxidant formulasI have written extensively regarding the benefits HPDI’s PRO-C™ and Ultimate Protector™ antioxidant formulas. Based upon my experience with these formulas they are among the most effective antioxidant formulas available.

Both antioxidant formulas are included in HPDI’s system of foundational supplements and work most effectively when used with multivitamins, essential fats, and superfoods.

Yet, both formulas also are excellent standalone products that can rapidly provide the body with extremely high protection against free radicals.
Ultimate Protector antioxidant formulas

We are often asked “which of these two antioxidant formulas should I take?” My answer usually is to take both formulas. I personally take both of them on a daily basis.

Below I will briefly show the reason my answer is to take both formulas. I include information showing the relationship, in terms of ingredients of the two formulas (per serving of three (3) capsules daily of PRO-C and six (6) capsules daily of Ultimate Protector).

Ultimate Protector

INGREDIENTS OF ANTIOXIDANT FORMULAS

PRO-C™ (per serving of three “00” veggie caps)

• Buffered non-GMO Vitamin C (1,500 mg)  buffered with Ca/Mg/Zn
• Grape Extract (seed, skin, and pulp) (90 mg)
• Green Tea Extract 95% polyphenols 40% min. EGCG (90 mg)
• Glutathione – reduced (60 mg)
• N-Acetyl-l-Cysteine (NAC) (45 mg)
• R-Lipoic Acid (15 mg)
• Coenzyme B2/R5P (3 mg)
• Coenzyme B6/P5P (3 mg)
• Selenium from l-selenomethionine (30 mcg)
• Calcium (70 mg)
• Magnesium (70 mg)
• Zinc (6 mg)

ULTIMATE PROTECTOR™ (per serving of six “0” veggie caps)

• Vitamin C as non-GMO Ascorbic acid (1500 mg)
• Anthocomplete™ (135 mg)  Wild Blueberry, Wild Bilberry, Acai, Black Currant Extract, Sweet Cherry, Raspberry, Elderberry, Blackberry, Aronia, Black Soybean Hull Extract, and Blue Corn
• CoffeeBerry®Forte (135 mg)
• Vitaberry® Plus (90 mg) freeze-dried Grape Seed, Wild Blueberry, Wild Bilberry, Cranberry, Tart Cherry, Prune, Raspberry Seed, Strawberry, Trans-Resveratrol, and Quercetin
• VitaVeggie® (90 mg)  Broccoli, Broccoli Sprouts, Tomato, Kale, Carrot, Brussels Sprouts, Onion, and Spinach
• Curcumin 95%  (90 mg)
• Trans-Resveratrol 98% (90 mg)
• Malic Acid (500 mg)
• Calcium (60 mg)
• Magnesium (60 mg)
• BioPerine® (7.5 mg)

The products together contain nine (9) unique PRO-C™ ingredients, eight (8) unique Ultimate Protector™ ingredients, and three (3) overlapping ingredients.

DISCUSSION OF ANTIOXIDANT FORMULAS

PRO-C™

When PRO-C™ was first released in 1997 there were few publications available regarding Nrf2 ingredients and their benefits. The product design was based on the work of Dr. Lester Packer and his work done on the “Antioxidant Network” showing how nutrients such as Vitamin E, Vitamin C, Glutathione, and Lipoic acid work in a redox network to regenerate key nutrients in the body (see Figure 1. below)

doctor lester packer antioxidant formulas

                                                Figure 1. – Dr. Packer’s Antioxidant Network

At that time the powerful antioxidant formulas of Grape Seed Extract and Green Tea Extract were well known, but their powerful Nrf2 effects were not discovered until later. These ingredients are able to trap free radicals and conserve the body’s store of network antioxidants.

Also, the Nrf2 effects of NAC and Lipoic acid were not known at the time, but their powerful effects on the body were known to support the production of glutathione. Additionally, the super powerful glutathione (reduced) was included with supporting coenzymes B2 (from riboflavin 5′-phosphate) and B6 (from pyridoxal 5′-phosphate) that allow the enzymes glutathione reductase and transferase to function at a higher level.

ULTIMATE PROTECTOR™

From the beginning of the design process, Ultimate Protector™ (UP) was focused on creating a highly effective Nrf2 activator formula with outstanding antioxidant effects. Our understanding was that a very broad spectrum of plant polyphenols including flavonoids, anthocyandins, oligoproanthocyanidins (OPCs), etc. would deliver the best results.

We selected Futureceuticals Anthocomplete™, CoffeeBerry® Forte, Vitaberry® Plus, and VitaVeggie® in order to accomplish this and added Curcumin 95%, and Trans-Resveratrol 98% because of the powerful scientific findings regarding Nrf2 activation for these two ingredients. We found out later in testing that this combination of ingredients produces very high ORAC5.0 values (486,000 units/serving of six capsules) and works effectively against all of the primary types of free radicals in the body.

WHY TAKE BOTH PRO-C™ AND
ULTIMATE PROTECTOR™ ANTIOXIDANT FORMULAS?

Ultimate Protector versus PRO-C antioxidant formulas

Venn diagram showing unique and overlapping ingredients in PRO-C and Ultimate Protector.

There are 29 unique Nrf2 activator ingredients in Ultimate Protector (UP) and four (4) non-overlapping Nrf2 activator ingredients in PRO-C. Thus by taking both formulas you are able to receive 33 identifiable Nrf2 activator ingredients (870 mg). The amount of unique Nrf2 ingredients is probably significantly more than this because most of the identifiable ingredients contain a range of plant polyphenols.

Other unique ingredients of each formula include glutathione – reduced (60 mg), malic acid (500 mcg), zinc (6 mg), selenium (30 mcg), B2 (3 mg) and B6 (3 mg) from coenzyme forms, and Bioperine (7.5 mg) (for enhanced absorption of nutrients). These are important ingredients to have the formulas work more effectively together.

The overlapping ingredients in the formula include Vitamin C (3 gm – 1.5 gm from each formula), calcium (130 mg – 70 mg from PRO-C & 60 mg from UP), magnesium (130 mg – 70 mg from PRO-C & 60 mg from UP), and a little grape seed extract (~10 mg). We view this to be very positive especially because we believe that most people should take in at least 3 grams daily of Vitamin C. Equal amounts of calcium and magnesium balance each other in the body and have many important functions such as being part of critical enzymes.

SOURCES & RESOURCES

The Antioxidant Miracle. Lester Packer, PhD, and Carol Coleman. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1999.

“Antioxidant Cocktail Update: Part 1: The Take Home Message is to Use Antioxidant Supplements”
(Interview of Dr. Lester Packer by Richard A. Passwater, PhD, Whole Foods Magazine, 1999)

HPDI BLOG ARTICLES

CONTACT US:

You can reach HPDI by calling 1-800-228-4265, email support(at)IntegratedHealth.com, or visit the retail website: IntegratedHealth.com

Health care professionals and resellers can apply for wholesale account, which includes access to the HPDI reseller website: HealthProductsDistributors.com. Email: Support(at)HealthProductsDistributors.com.

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ULTIMATE PROTECTOR INGREDIENTS – ARONIA (CHOKEBERRY)

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD aronia (chokeberry) nrf2 ultimate protectorUltimate Protector contains aronia (chokeberry), as well as components from 29 different fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Each of these ingredients contain substances that may be considered to be polyphenols, antioxidants and Nrf2 activators. In this article I will explore the ingredient aronia (chokeberry) which is a component of Anthocomplete® from Futureceuticals.

Aronia melanocarpa (black chokeberry) has attracted scientific interest due to its deep purple, almost black pigmentation that arises from dense contents of polyphenols, especially anthocyanins. Total polyphenol content is 1752 mg per 100 g in fresh berries, anthocyanin content is 1480 mg per 100 g, and proanthocyanidin concentration is 664 mg per 100 g. These values are among the highest measured in plants to date.

The plant produces these pigments mainly in the leaves and skin of the berries to protect the pulp and seeds from constant exposure to ultraviolet radiation and production of free radicals. By absorbing UV rays in the blue-purple spectrum, leaf and skin pigments filter intense sunlight, serve antioxidant functions and thereby have a role assuring regeneration of the species.

Analysis of polyphenols in chokeberries has identified the following individual chemicals (among hundreds known to exist in the plant kingdom): cyanidin-3-galactoside, cyanidin-3-arabinoside, quercetin-3-glycoside, epicatechin, caffeic acid, delphinidin, petunidin, pelargonidin, peonidin, and malvidin.All these except caffeic acid are members of the flavonoid category of phenolics.

In a standard measurement of antioxidant strength, the oxygen radical absorbance capacity or ORAC, demonstrates aronia to have one of the highest values yet recorded for a fruit — 16,062 micro moles of Trolox Eq. per 100 g. The components contributing to this high measurement were both anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins, with the proanthocyanidin level “among the highest in foods”, which may explain their potent astringent taste.

Below we provide information from several research articles that highlight some of the potential health effects of Aronia (Chokeberry)

 

Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa)
A Review on the Characteristic Components and Potential Health Effects

From: https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/html/10.1055/s-0028-1088306

Abstract

The intention of this review is to contribute to a better understanding of the potentials of the nutritional contribution of Aronia berries (Aronia melanocarpa). The paper gives a short background to their botanical classification and cultivation practice, going in detail to describe the chemical composition of the berries. The emphasis is laid thereby upon the phenolic constituents. The paper finally gives a short resume of their beneficial effects in biological systems in vitro, in animals, and in humans, thus underlining their medicinal potential.

Antioxidant Effect

Aronia (Chokeberry)

Black Aronia (Chokeberry)

A few reports also describe an antioxidant effect in an animal model, where chokeberry anthocyanins decrease lipid peroxidation and enhance the activity of enzymes which are involved in the antioxidant defense system. One further study noted that the red pigment fraction of chokeberry fruits composed of cyanidin derivatives is a potent scavenger of DPPH radicals in both in vitro and in vivo systems and is able to prevent in a dose-dependent manner gastric mucosal damage that was induced by the subsequent application of ethanol. The authors suggested that one of the mechanisms by which the extract suppresses the development of the gastric mucosal damage is the scavenging of active oxygen by its cyanidin derivatives since the suppression of gastric acid secretion was not observed. An antioxidant effect was also found in humans, where a dietary supplementation with chokeberry juice limits the exercise-induced oxidative damage to red blood cells in rowers.

Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation

Many reports suggest anti-proliferative or protective effects of chokeberries and/or chokeberry extracts against colon cancer on the basis of in vitro studies and in one animal study. An anthocyanin-rich extract from Aronia melanocarpa was shown to inhibit the growth as well as to stimulate apoptosis of human HT-29 colon cancer cells but exerted only little effect on the growth of non-transformed NCM460 colonic cells. Interestingly, the chokeberry extract inhibited the growth to a greater extent than grape and bilberry anthocyanin-rich extracts when inhibition was compared at similar concentrations of monomeric anthocyanin. Another study demonstrated that the exposure to chokeberry juice inhibited Caco-2 cell proliferation by causing G2/M cell cycle arrest. Gene expression analysis revealed that the tumour suppressor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), whose expression is known to be reduced in the majority of early adenomas and carcinomas, was up-regulated in the Caco-2 cells following repetitive exposure to dietary levels of chokeberry juice. The anticarcinogenic potential was further supported by data from an animal study using male rats treated with the colon carcinogen azoxymethane. An anthocyanin-rich extract from chokeberry inhibited the formation of the azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci, a tentative marker of dysplasia and malignant transformation, and decreased the colonic epithelial cell proliferation rate as well as the faecal bile acid concentration. The data go in line with recent studies reporting that isolated cyanidin 3-O-glucoside exhibits chemopreventive activities.

Antimutagenic effects

Phenolic compounds isolated from berries of Aronia melanocarpa also exert an antimutagenic activity. Anthocyanins isolated from aronia (chokeberry) markedly inhibited the mutagenic activity of benzo[a]pyrene and 2-aminofluorene in the Ames test as well as in the sister chromatid exchange assay with cultured human lymphocytes. Furthermore, aronia juice intake was shown to inhibit the endogenous generation of N-nitrosamines in rats treated with aminopyrin plus sodium nitrite. In consequence, histopathological changes observed in livers of rats fed with nitrosamine precursors were prevented by co-treatment with aronia juice.

Hepatoprotective effects

In an animal study, anthocyanins from aronia (chokeberry) decreased the toxicity and accumulation of cadmium in the liver and kidney of rats receiving both these components in their diet. It may testify to the possibility of anthocyanins chelating metal ions which in consequence may decrease the damages caused by cadmium. Interestingly, a hepatoprotective effect of aronia juice was also observed in rats after acute exposure to carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). The liver cytotoxicity from CCl4 is dependent upon its metabolism by cytochrome P450 to highly reactive trichloromethyl free radicals. The reaction of the CCl3 radical with oxygen initiates lipid peroxidation which results ultimately in the cell death. Aronia (chokeberry) juice prevented the CCl4-induced increase of lipid peroxidation as measured by the malonodialdehyde content in rat liver and plasma. One might conclude that the ability of anthocyanins and/or other phenolic constituents to scavenge free radicals is mainly responsible for the observed effect.

Cardioprotective effects

Aronia (chokeberry) can positively influence several risk factors for cardiovascular disease. In vitro experiments demonstrate that the phenolic constituents contribute to the protection and restoration of endothelial cells and consequently to their function. Furthermore anti-platelet effects, as well as vasoactive and vasoprotective properties in porcine coronary arteries were observed. In an experimental model of hyperlipidaemia in rats aronia fruit juice hindered the dietary-induced elevation of plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and plasma lipids. In men with a mild hypercholesterolaemia regular aronia (chokeberry) juice drinking (250 mL per day) for six weeks resulted in a significant decrease in serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and trigylceride level whereas the HDL2 cholesterol level was increased. Furthermore a moderate but significant decrease in serum glucose, homocysteine and fibrinogen concentration was noted. The metabolic changes were associated with a reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure by a mean of 13 and 7 mm Hg, respectively. A similar hypotensive effect of a flavonoid-rich extract from chokeberry fruits was lately observed in patients after myocardial infarction, treated simultaneously with statins and in patients with diabetes mellitus type II. Other effects studied include enhanced reduction in cardiovascular risk markers in patients after myocardial infarction suggesting a possible clinical use for secondary prevention of isachaemic heart diesease.

Antidiabetes effects

Research of other authors has demonstrated that Aronia melanocarpa anthocyanins might be useful in the prevention and control of diabetes mellitus type II and diabetes-associated complications. In an animal model the administration of aronia (chokeberry) fruit juice to diabetic rats appeared to attenuate hyperglycaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia. In a human intervention study the daily intake of 200 mL aronia (chokeberry) juice over a period of 3 months was effective in lowering fasting glucose levels in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes. Furthermore aronia (chokeberry) juice showed a beneficial effect on HbA1c-glycosylated haemoglobin, total cholesterol and lipid levels. These findings go in line with reports showing an effect of other procyanidin-rich foods on diabetes. Recent human studies also document that aronia (chokeberry) juice may be useful in in the treatment of obesity disorders.

Conclusions

In conclusion, aronia (chokeberry) (Aronia melanocarpa), a lesser known berry fruit, is one of the richest plant sources of highly interesting phenolic phytochemicals including procyanidins and anthocyanins. The high content as well as the pattern of the phenolic constituents seems to be responsible for the wide range of its potential medicinal and therapeutic effects. Further studies are needed to understand the beneficial effects reported so far also from the mechanistic point of view. However, it seems desirable that the spread and popularity of aronia (chokeberry) food products in the future will increase and expand consumers’ choice for healthy berry fruits.

 

 

Protective effect of chokeberry on chemical-induced oxidative stress in rat.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20488852

Hum Exp Toxicol. 2011 Mar;30(3):199-208. doi: 10.1177/0960327110371697. Epub 2010 May 20. Kujawska M1, Ignatowicz E, Ewertowska M, Oszmiański J, Jodynis-Liebert J.

Abstract

Aronia (Chokeberry) Tea

Aronia (Chokeberry) makes a nice tea.

Male Wistar rats were treated with chokeberry juice per os, 10 mL/kg/day, for 28 days and a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), 150 mg/kg, or carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)), 2 ml/kg. The level of hepatic microsomal lipid peroxidation, expressed as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), was increased in animals dosed with NDEA and CCl(4). Juice pretreatment resulted in a significant decrease in TBARS by 53% and 92%, respectively. In rats administered juice alone, 50% decrease in TBARS was noted. The activities of all antioxidant enzymes were decreased in the liver of rats administered either toxicant by 29%-52% as compared to controls. Juice pretreatment resulted in an increase in the activity of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase by 117%, 56% and 44%, respectively, only in rats challenged with NDEA. Although no response of plasma protein carbonyls to both toxicants was observed, the pretreatment with juice caused a 55% decrease of this parameter in CCl(4)-dosed rats. DNA damage in blood leukocytes induced by either toxicant was slightly reduced, by 24%, in the rats pretreated with juice and administered NDEA. The results of the study showed that pretreatment with chokeberry juice confers some protection against chemical-induced oxidative stress.

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 912769, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/912769

 

The Involvement of a Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Black Chokeberry in Oxidative Stress on Experimental Arterial Hypertension

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3600185/

Manuela Ciocoiu,1 Laurentiu Badescu,2 Anca Miron,3 and Magda Badescu1

Abstract

The aim of this study is to characterize the content of Aronia melanocarpa Elliott (black chokeberry) extract and also to estimate the influence of polyphenolic compounds contained in chokeberries on oxidative stress, on an L-NAME-induced experimental model of arterial hypertension. The rat blood pressure values were recorded using a CODA Noninvasive Blood Pressure System. HPLC/DAD coupled with ElectroSpray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry allowed identification of five phenolic compounds in berries ethanolic extract as follows: chlorogenic acid, kuromanin, rutin, hyperoside, and quercetin. The serous activity of glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) has significantly lower values in the hypertensive (AHT) group as compared to the group protected by polyphenols (AHT + P). The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) values are lower in the AHT group and they are significantly higher in the AHT + P group. All the measured blood pressure components revealed a biostatistically significant blood pressure drop between the AHT group and the AHT + P group. The results reveal the normalization of the reduced glutathion (GSH) concentration as well as a considerable reduction in the malondialdehyde (MDA) serum concentration in the AHT + P group. Ethanolic extract of black chokeberry fruits not only has a potential value as a prophylactic agent but also may function as a nutritional supplement in the management of arterial hypertension.

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 912769, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/912769

Extracts, anthocyanins and procyanidins from Aronia melanocarpa as radical scavengers and enzyme inhibitors.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23459328
Bräunlich M1, Slimestad RWangensteen HBrede CMalterud KEBarsett H.

Abstract

Extracts, subfractions, isolated anthocyanins and isolated procyanidins B2, B5 and C1 from the berries and bark of Aronia melanocarpa were investigated for their antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities. Four different bioassays were used, namely scavenging of the diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, inhibition of 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO), inhibition of xanthine oxidase (XO) and inhibition of α-glucosidase. Among the anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-arabinoside possessed the strongest and cyanidin 3-xyloside the weakest radical scavenging and enzyme inhibitory activity. These effects seem to be influenced by the sugar units linked to the anthocyanidin. Subfractions enriched in procyanidins were found to be potent α-glucosidase inhibitors; they possessed high radical scavenging properties, strong inhibitory activity towards 15-LO and moderate inhibitory activity towards XO. Trimeric procyanidin C1 showed higher activity in the biological assays compared to the dimeric procyanidins B2 and B5. This study suggests that different polyphenolic compounds of A. melanocarpa can have beneficial effects in reducing blood glucose levels due to inhibition of α-glucosidase and may have a potential to alleviate oxidative stress.

Nutrients. 2013 Mar 4;5(3):663-78. doi: 10.3390/nu5030663.

 

SUMMARY

Aronia (chokeberry) is an exciting fruit full of important polyphenols, antioxidants and Nrf2 activators that help to make Ultimate Protector such an outstanding nutritional supplement. This ingredient is becoming much more well known as research studies identify its many benefits. Recently, I was happy to find that the Knudsen “Just Fruit” brand has introduced “Just Aronia”. Try it!!!

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES