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ULTIMATE PROTECTOR+ INGREDIENTS – CURCUMIN

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD biography about us HPDI integratedhealth formulator founder CEO scientist physicist wild bilberry and wild blueberry

Ultimate Protector+ contains curcuminoids (greater than 95% from turmeric), as well as extracts from 12 different fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Each of these ingredients contain substances that may be considered to be polyphenols, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators. In this article I will explore the ingredient curcuminoids. Curcuminoids are added as a separate ingredient in Ultimate Protector+.

Ultimate Protector+ Includes Curcumin

Ultimate Protector+ Includes Curcumin

Curcuminoids are the major active component of turmeric, a yellow compound isolated from the plant Curcuma longa (a member of the ginger family) and has been used for centuries in traditional medicines. Curcuminoids in turmeric include curcumin, desmethoxycurcumin, and bisdesmethoxycurcumin (these are standardized in the Sabinsa Curcumin C3 Complex® ingredient).

turmeric plant curcuminoids

The turmeric plant produces beautiful flowers

Extensive research over the past 30 years indicates that these molecules can provide positive benefits against a wide range of health issues related to cell function, lungs, liver, nervous system, joint function, metabolism, and cardiovascular system. Numerous lines of evidence indicate that curcuminoids are highly pleiotropic with anti-inflammatory, hypoglycemic, antioxidant, wound healing, and antimicrobial activities.

Curcuminoids exert both direct and indirect antioxidant effects by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inducing the expression of cytoprotective proteins in an Nrf2-dependent way. It is considered a bifunctional antioxidant. The nuclear-factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a ubiquitous master transcription factor which induces the endogenous production of cytoprotective proteins/enzymes through binding to antioxidant response elements (AREs) at the DNA/gene level.

An excellent and extensive online source of information on curcuminoids (curcumin) can be found at: http://examine.com/supplements/Curcumin/

Scientific Studies on the Health Protective Effects of Curcuminoids

Databases (like the PubMed database of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)) of scientific studies contain thousands of up-to-date studies and abstracts about curcumin/curcuminoids.

Curcumin curcuminoids

Turmeric root is the source of curcuminoids

Below we provide a few relevant scientific studies on the antioxidant effects and potential health benefits of curcumin/curcuminoids.

Pharmacological basis for the role of curcumin in chronic diseases: an age-old spice with modern targets

Abstract

Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow pigment in the spice turmeric (also called curry powder), has been used for centuries as a treatment for inflammatory diseases. Extensive research within the past two decades has shown that curcumin mediates its anti-inflammatory effects through the downregulation of inflammatory transcription factors (such as nuclear factor kappaB), enzymes (such as cyclooxygenase 2 and 5 lipoxygenase) and cytokines (such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1 and interleukin 6). Because of the crucial role of inflammation in most chronic diseases, the potential of curcumin has been examined in neoplastic, neurological, cardiovascular, pulmonary and metabolic diseases. The pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of curcumin have been examined in animals and in humans. Various pharmacological aspects of curcumin in vitro and in vivo are discussed in detail here.

Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin

Abstract

Curcumin, a yellow pigment from Curcuma longa, is a major component of turmeric and is commonly used as a spice and food-coloring agent. It is also used as a cosmetic and in some medical preparations. The desirable preventive or putative therapeutic properties of curcumin have also been considered to be associated with its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Because free-radical-mediated peroxidation of membrane lipids and oxidative damage of DNA and proteins are believed to be associated with a variety of chronic pathological complications such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases, curcumin is thought to play a vital role against these pathological conditions. The anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin is most likely mediated through its ability to inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), lipoxygenase (LOX), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). COX-2, LOX, and iNOS are important enzymes that mediate inflammatory processes. Improper upregulation of COX-2 and/or iNOS has been associated with the pathophysiology of certain types of human cancer as well as inflammatory disorders. Because inflammation is closely linked to tumor promotion, curcumin with its potent anti-inflammatory property is anticipated to exert chemopreventive effects on carcinogenesis. Hence, the past few decades have witnessed intense research devoted to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin. In this review, we describe both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin, the mode of action of curcumin, and its therapeutic usage against different pathological conditions.

Curcumin: The Indian Solid Gold

Abstract

Turmeric, derived from the plant Curcuma longa, is a gold-colored spice commonly used in the Indian subcontinent, not only for health care but also for the preservation of food and as a yellow dye for textiles. Curcumin, which gives the yellow color to turmeric, was first isolated almost two centuries ago, and its structure as diferuloylmethane was determined in 1910. Since the time of Ayurveda (1900 Bc) numerous therapeutic activities have been assigned to turmeric for a wide variety of diseases and conditions, including those of the skin, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal systems, aches, pains, wounds, sprains, and liver disorders. Extensive research within the last half century has proven that most of these activities, once associated with turmeric, are due to curcumin. Curcumin has been shown to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities and thus has a potential against various malignant diseases, diabetes, allergies, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and other chronic illnesses. These effects are mediated through the regulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, protein kinases, and other enzymes. Curcumin exhibits activities similar to recently discovered tumor necrosis factor blockers (e.g., HUMIRA, REMICADE, and ENBREL), a vascular endothelial cell growth factor blocker (e.g., AVASTIN), human epidermal growth factor receptor blockers (e.g., ERBITUX, ERLOTINIB, and GEFTINIB), and a HER2 blocker (e.g., HERCEPTIN). Considering the recent scientific bandwagon that multitargeted therapy is better than monotargeted therapy for most diseases, curcumin can be considered an ideal “Spice for Life”.

Curcumin decreases oxidative stress in mitochondria isolated from liver and kidneys of high-fat diet-induced obese mice

Abstract

Oxidative stress plays a key role in obesity and diabetes-related mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction is characterized by increased oxidative damage, nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, and a reduced ratio of adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) production/oxygen consumption. Curcumin represents a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. In this study, our objective was to determine the effect of curcumin treatment on oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice (OM). These results suggest that curcumin treatment increased oxygen consumption and significantly decreased lipid and protein oxidation levels in liver mitochondria isolated from HFD-induced OM compared with those in the untreated OM (UOM). In kidney mitochondria, curcumin treatment significantly increased oxygen consumption and decreased lipid and protein peroxidation levels in HFD-induced OM when compared with those in UOM. Curcumin treatment neither has any effect on body weight gain nor have any effects on mitochondrial NO synthesis. These findings suggest that obesity induces oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas curcumin may have a protective role against obesity-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

Curcumin for radiation dermatitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of thirty breast cancer patients.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23745991

Abstract

Radiation dermatitis occurs in approximately 95% of patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the ability of curcumin to reduce radiation dermatitis severity in 30 breast cancer patients. Eligible patients were adult females with noninflammatory breast cancer or carcinoma in situ prescribed RT without concurrent chemotherapy. Randomized patients took 2.0 grams of curcumin or placebo orally three times per day (i.e., 6.0 grams daily) throughout their course of RT. Weekly assessments included Radiation Dermatitis Severity (RDS) score, presence of moist desquamation, redness measurement, McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form and Symptom Inventory questionnaire. The 30 evaluable patients were primarily white (90%) and had a mean age of 58.1 years. Standard pooled variances t test showed that curcumin reduced RDS at end of treatment compared to placebo (mean RDS = 2.6 vs. 3.4; P = 0.008). Fisher’s exact test revealed that fewer curcumin-treated patients had moist desquamation (28.6% vs. 87.5%; P = 0.002). No significant differences were observed between arms for demographics, compliance, radiation skin dose, redness, pain or symptoms. In conclusion, oral curcumin, 6.0 g daily during radiotherapy, reduced the severity of radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients.

Curcumin attenuates insulin resistance in hepatocytes by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation

From: http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/22024084

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS: NF-E2-Related Factor-2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the cellular protection against oxidative stress. Curcumin has been reported to induce Nrf2 nuclear translocation and upregulate the expression of numerous reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxifying and antioxidant genes in hepatocytes.This study was designed to investigate whether curcumin-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation could reduce ROS-mediated insulin resistance in cultured LO2 hepatocytes. METHODOLOGY: Human LO2 hepatocytes were incubated with curcumin and glucose oxidase (GO) in the presence/absence of wortmannin (a phosphatidyinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor). Oxidative stress, cellular damage, Nrf2 nuclear translocation and insulin resistance were measured. RESULTS: GO exposure significantly increased intracellular ROS, glutathione (GSH) depletion, malondialdehyde (MDA) formation, and increased activities of cellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate amino transferase (AST), as well as causing insulin resistance. Curcumin pretreatment significantly attenuated these disturbances in intracellular ROS, liver enzyme activity and significantly antagonized the lipid peroxidation, GSH depletion and insulin resistance induced by GO in LO2 hepatocytes. These effects paralleled Nrf2 nuclear translocation induced by curcumin. Wortmannin partially blocked curcumin-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation. In addition, wortmannin prevented curcumin-induced improvements in intracellular ROS, MDA formation, GSH depletion, liver enzyme activity and insulin resistance in cultured LO2 hepatocytes. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that curcumin could reduce ROS-mediated insulin resistance in hepatocytes, at least in part through nuclear translocation of Nrf2.

Long Term Effect of Curcumin in Restoration of Tumour Suppressor p53 and Phase-II Antioxidant Enzymes via Activation of Nrf2 Signalling and Modulation of Inflammation in Prevention of Cancer

From: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/curcumin-potentiated-significant-increase-nrf2-activation-it-restored-activityPLoS One.

Abstract

Inhibition of carcinogenesis may be a consequence of attenuation of oxidative stress via activation of antioxidant defence system, restoration and stabilization of tumour suppressor proteins along with modulation of inflammatory mediators. Previously we have delineated a significant role of curcumin during its long-term effect in regulation of glycolytic pathway and angiogenesis, which in turn results in prevention of cancer via modulation of stress activated genes. The present study was designed to investigate long-term effects of curcumin in regulation of Nrf2 mediated phase-II antioxidant enzymes, tumour suppressor p53 and inflammation under oxidative tumour microenvironment in liver of T-cell lymphoma bearing mice. Inhibition of Nrf2 signalling observed during lymphoma progression, resulted in down regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes, p53 as well as activation of inflammatory signals. Curcumin potentiated a significant increase in Nrf2 activation. It restored activity of phase-II antioxidant enzymes like GST, GR, NQO1, and tumour suppressor p53 level. In addition, curcumin modulated inflammation via upregulation of TGF-β and reciprocal regulation of iNOS and COX2. The study suggests that during long term effect, curcumin leads to prevention of cancer by inducing phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling, restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and modulation of inflammatory mediators like iNOS and COX2 in liver of lymphoma bearing mice.

Curcumin Activates the Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene via Regulation of Nrf2 and the Antioxidant Responsive Element

From: http://www.academia.edu/309816/Curcumin_Activates_the_Haem_Oxygenase-1_Gene_via_Regulation_of_Nrf2_and_the_Antioxidant-Responsive_Element

Synopsis

The transcription factor Nrf2, which normally exists in an inactive state as a consequenceof binding to a cytoskeleton-associated protein Keap1, can be activated by redox-dependent stimuli. Alteration of the Nrf2/Keap1 interaction enables Nrf2 to translocate to the nucleus, bind to the antioxidant responsive element (ARE) and initiates the transcription of genes encoding for detoxifying enzymes and cytoprotective proteins. This response is also triggered by a class of electrophilic compounds including polyphenols and plant-derived constituents. Recently, the natural antioxidants curcumin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) have been identified as potent inducers of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a redox-sensitive inducible protein that provides protection against various forms of stress. Here, we show that in renal epithelial cells both curcumin and CAPE stimulate the expression of Nrf2 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect was associated with a significant increase in HO-1 protein expression and hemeoxygenase activity. From several lines of investigation we also report that curcumin (and, by inference, CAPE) stimulates HO-1 gene activity by promoting inactivation of the Nrf2/Keap1 complex leading to increased Nrf2 binding to the resident HO-1 AREs. Moreover, using antibodies and specific inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, we provide data implicating p38 MAPK in curcumin-mediated HO-1 induction. Taken together, these results demonstrate that induction of HO-1 by curcumin and CAPE requires the activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway.

Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers.

Abstract

The medicinal properties of curcumin obtained from Curcuma longa L. cannot be utilised because of poor bioavailability due to its rapid metabolism in the liver and intestinal wall. In this study, the effect of combining piperine, a known inhibitor of hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation, was evaluated on the bioavailability of curcumin in rats and healthy human volunteers. When curcumin was given alone, in the dose 2 g/kg to rats, moderate serum concentrations were achieved over a period of 4 h. Concomitant administration of piperine 20 mg/kg increased the serum concentration of curcumin for a short period of 1-2 h post drug. Time to maximum was significantly increased (P < 0.02) while elimination half life and clearance significantly decreased (P < 0.02), and the bioavailability was increased by 154%. On the other hand in humans after a dose of 2 g curcumin alone, serum levels were either undetectable or very low. Concomitant administration of piperine 20 mg produced much higher concentrations from 0.25 to 1 h post drug (P < 0.01 at 0.25 and 0.5 h; P < 0.001 at 1 h), the increase in bioavailability was 2000%. The study shows that in the dosages used, piperine enhances the serum concentration, extent of absorption and bioavailability of curcumin in both rats and humans with no adverse effects.

SUMMARY

Curcuminoids are important polyphenols, antioxidants, and Nrf2 activators that help make Ultimate Protector+ an outstanding nutritional supplement.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

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QUICKSILVER LIPOSOMAL FORMULAS – NEW PRODUCTS!

Fred Liers PhD quicksilver liposomal formulasOne of the most significant developments for nutrient uptake and assimilation is the advent of liposomal delivery systems. Once in the range of 300–5,000 nanometers, the latest liposomes are now just 20–100 nanometers (nm)!

The significance of these small liposomes—tiny bilayer lipid structures—is that there is a major increase in the amount of nutrient delivery to cells. That is, small liposomes show significantly greater efficiency at intracellular delivery of encapsulated compounds.

Liposomal delivery systems have evolved rapidly and now offer major advantages over nutritional supplements delivered by standard means—like capsules, tablets, powders, and liquids (e.g., tinctures).

Liposomal delivery systems first utilized multi-lamellar vesicles (MLV) ranging ins size from 300–5,000 nanometers. Later, “large” unilamellar vesicles (LUV) (100–300 nanometers) were developed. Products containing LUVs are more effectively assimilated than MLVs.

As noted, lipsomal technologies have shrunk liposome sizes to 20–100 nanometers (nm), the category size for small unilamellar vesicles (SUV). This means the body can far more easily assimilate nutrients delivered liposomally when the particle sizes are up to 10 times smaller than already effective liposome sizes.

Small liposomes (SUV) have a long circulation half-life and better cellular accumulation. Small lipid particles have the fastest uptake kinetics and can participate in paracellular (between cells) transport. The nutritional liposome industry is rapidly moving toward the use of small liposomes.

Key Point: Small liposomes (SUV) are significantly more efficient at intracellular delivery of encapsulated compounds. In a recent study with carefully sized liposomes, cellular uptake increased nine-fold as liposome size was decreased from 236 nm to 97 nm and was 34 fold higher at 64 nm.

Nutrients that can be delivered liposomally range from vitamin C and glutathione to many types of adaptogenic and medicinal herbs.

Benefits of Liposomal Delivery

  • Rapid update, assimilation, and movement into cells
  • Oral intake bypasses digestive system—nutrients go directly into body
  • High levels of nutrients assimilated
  • Reduced dosages and less “wasted” product
  • Nutrients penetrate smallest compartments in the body
  • Nutrients circulate widely
  • Precise intra-oral delivery
  • Simple manual pump from glass bottle
  • Easy water dispersability when desired
  • Good tasting!

Liposomal delivery systems are the future of nutritional supplements given all the advantages they confer. HPDI recognizes the value of liposomal products, and now offers the best formulas available—from Quicksilver Scientific, Inc.—to our customers.

QUICKSILVER LIPOSOMAL FORMULAS

HPDI offers four liposomal formulas from Quicksilver Scientific, the leader in nanoliposomal delivery systems. Each formula offers unparalleled uptake and assimilation—and good taste!—via inta-oral delivery. These products include:

Quicksilver liposomal formulas

HPDI offers four liposomal formulas from Quicksilver Scientific.

Liposomal Vitamin C with R-Lipoic Acid (mean size 50–100nm): Quicksilver Scientific’s Etheric Delivery™ system for Liposomal Vitamin C (with R-Lipoic Acid) is the most absorbable form of professional-grade Vitamin C. Vitamin C is essential to any detoxification program because it feeds the system that eliminates toxins. It is also very effective in removing lead and other heavy metals from our system and fighting off the free radicals that form in the liver during the first phase of detoxification.

R-Lipoic Acid (as sodium R-Lipoate) has an exceptionally well-documented ability to upregulate the glutathione system via the Nrf2 nuclear transcription pathway. This combination of liposomal vitamin C and R-Lipoate in a nanoliposomal delivery system potently harnesses the potential of Vitamin C to the power of a fully functioning glutathione system.

The absorption of conventional oral Vitamin C diminishes rapidly as the dose increases (e.g., about 19% for 1000 mg oral vitamin C). Nanosphere delivery greatly increases absorption and for some compounds can provide higher intracellular delivery than an IV administration.

Quicksilver Vitamin C

Quicksilver Liposomal Vitamin C with R-Lipoic Acid

Suggested Usage: General use for antioxidant and detoxification function, take eight pumps per day (1,000 mg of Vitamin C and 50 mg of R-Lipoate). For advanced intermittent use, use up to 50 pumps per day (6,250 mg Vitamin C and 312.5 mg R-Lipoate) or more, in divided doses throughout the day. For detoxification protocols, especially with metal toxicities, build dosage gradually, starting from low doses, as they are tolerated. If strong detoxification reactions are observed, back off dosage. Children should start at approximately 1/4 of adult (two pumps per day) dosage and work up. For topical application, one pump can cover the face for a daily treatment, or use several pumps as a mask and leave on for 10–15 minutes; skin can be re-wetted and left for another 10 minutes before rinsing off excess.

Liposomal Glutathione: Quicksilver’s Phospholipid Encapsulation Etheric Delivery system protects glutathione from digestive enzymes that otherwise inhibit absorption of oral glutathione supplementation. In cell cultures, liposomal products have demonstrated over 100 times more efficiency for intracellular delivery than IV-based liposomal glutathione.

Quicksilver’s Liposomal Glutathione comes with a precision pump to accurately deliver 50 mg of reduced glutathione and 68 mg of injectable-grade essential phospholipids (derived from sunflower oil) per pump. The patent-pending process, plus a natural lemon flavoring, allows this product to be taken intra-orally for maximum absorption without the foul sulfur taste typical of liposomal glutathione products. The formula can be taken every 3–4 hours for even delivery throughout the day. One bottle delivers 100, 0.5 ml doses.

Quicksilver Liposomal Glutathione

Quicksilver Liposomal Glutathione with Lemon Mint

Suggested Usage: For general antioxidant and detoxification protection, use eight pumps per day (400 mg glutathione). For advanced protection, use up to 20 per day (1,000 mg glutathione) or more, in divided doses throughout the day. For large doses, take two pumps at a time to allow for maximum oral absorption, and hold at least 30 seconds before swallowing. Children should start at approximately 1/4 of adult (two pumps per day) dosage and work up.

Liposomal Colorado Hemp Oil: This product uses non-THC (<0.3%) cannabidiol (CBD) from all-natural Colorado Hemp Oil. CBD is the non-psychoactive part of the industrial hemp plant. Quicksilver Scientific’s liposomal delivery of Nanoemulsified Colorado Hemp Oil far outpaces tinctures and is faster, stronger and more effective. Cannabidiol interacts with our body’s naturally occurring cannabinoid receptors to aid with pain relief and enhanced feelings of well being. The advanced technology behind this groundbreaking liquid delivery method makes for precise dosing and immediate effect.

Because of the known interaction of CBD with these cannabidiol receptors, much new research has focused on CBD’s receptor-mediated neuro-protective, antiemetic, and analgesic properties, and of its effect on mood and other aspects of mental health.

New research on gene transcription modulation offers an even deeper look into the biochemical mechanisms at work when ingesting CBD. Research in this vein has shown more than 1,000 genes that are differentially upregulated by CBD (a more than ten-fold increase than those affected by THC). In general, the effects increased cell stress responses—including antioxidant-defense and detoxification genes (mainly via EhRE/ARE-Nrf2 induction)—and downregulated many inflammation-mediating genes. These effects combined with CBDs NMDA-receptor-stabilizing effects, show great promise for its use in calming the neuro-inflammatory responses accompanying neurotoxic and chronic illness states.

Quicksilver Nanoemulsified Colorado Hemp Oil

Nanoemulsified Colorado Hemp Oil

Suggested Use: Take 1–4 pumps by mouth, holding for 30 seconds before swallowing. Repeat if needed. Four pumps contain 30 mg of Hemp Extract (aerial parts) and 12 mg of Phytocannabinoid Diols. There are 25 four-pump servings per container. Best taken on an empty stomach 10 minutes before meals. May be stirred into a small amount of water. Once opened, use within 60 days. Store at room temperature and away from light.

Liposomal NanoMojo (adaptogenic blend): Dr. Christopher Shade, PhD of Quicksilver Scientific, collaborated with master herbalist Dan Moriarty of Sun Horse Energy to create NanoMojo, a groundbreaking functional medicine product. By combining Moriarty’s unique adaptogenic formulation with Dr. Shade’s state-of-the-art liposomal encapsulation, they’ve overcome the limitations of poor oral adsorption and made the phytochemicals quickly available at the cellular level. This new innovative blend of adaptogens from around the world is maximized for effectiveness.

Adaptogens are non-toxic phytochemicals that help the body achieve homeostatic balance under adverse conditions that would typically be associated with sympathetic (fight or flight) reactions. They help regulate natural harmony, adrenal balance, and stress accommodation (resistance to stress). In fact, adaptogenic herbs have been used in Ayurvedic medicine for more than 4,000 years and Chinese medicine for nearly 3,000 years to increase energy (chi) and concentration.

Scientific literature reports that adaptogenic herbs play significant roles in decreasing markers of stress-activated protein kinases, cortisol, and nitric oxide. These markers indicate a lowered level of systemic stress and inflammation and decreased symptoms of an over-taxed adrenal system.

NanoMojo contains the following adaptogenic herbs: Açaí, Lyceum (Goji) fruit, Gynostemma (Jiaogulan) (aerial parts), American Ginseng (root), Siberian Ginseng (root), Schisandra (fruit), Licorice (root), Rhodiola (root), Astragalus (root), Reishi (fruiting body), Catuaba (bark), Stinging Nettle (aerial parts), Saw Palmetto (fruit), Guarana (seed), Ashwagandha (root), Tribulus (aerial parts), Epimedium (aerial parts), Yohimbe (bark), and Organic Maple (sap) syrup.

NanoMojo helps your body adapt to the various conditions that cause stress, something most of us experience daily. This liposomal formulation is the culmination of more than eight years of research and development. Not only is it effective, but it also tastes very good.

Quicksilver liposomal NanoMojo adaptogens

NanoMojo Liposomal Adaptogenic Blend

Directions: Take two pumps twice daily, or more. May be mixed into a small amount of water. Best taken on an empty stomach. Once opened, use within 60 days.

CONCLUSION

The advent of small liposomes means significantly greater uptake and assimilation of nutrients than ever before. This means you stand to benefit greatly from advanced intra-orally delivered nanoliposomal formulas like those developed by Quicksilver Scientific, Inc.

 

 

SOURCES & RESOURCES

ARTICLES

Recent Advances in Liposome Technology (HPDI blog)

PRODUCTS

Quicksilver Scientific Liposomal Formulas (HPDI website)

Liposomal Vitamin C with R-Lipoic Acid

Liposomal Glutathione with Lemon Mint

Nanoemulsified Colorado Hemp Oil

NanoMojo Liposomal Adaptogenic Blend

 

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NO DEATHS FROM ANY DIETARY SUPPLEMENT: US POISON DATA SYSTEM

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD dietary supplementFred Liers PhD dietary supplement dshea

The recently published annual report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers indicates no deaths from dietary supplements in 2013. The annual report was published in the journal Clinical Toxicology and was based on information collected by the US National Poison Data System (NPDS).

The report also indicated no deaths from any amino acid product or herbal product.

vitamin dietary supplement safety

No deaths were caused by any dietary supplement in 2013 according to US NPDS data.

The full text of the January 16, 2015 press release obtained from the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service (OMNS) follows. ~

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, January 16, 2015

No Deaths from ANY Dietary Supplement

Zero Fatalities from Minerals, Vitamins, Amino Acids, Herbs, Homeopathic Remedies

by Andrew W. Saul, Editor

(OMNS Jan 16, 2015) There was not even one death caused by any dietary supplement in 2013, according to the most recent information collected by the US National Poison Data System. The new 251-page annual report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers, published in the journal Clinical Toxicology (1), shows no deaths whatsoever from any dietary supplement.

Additionally, there were zero deaths from any amino acid or herbal product. This means no deaths at all from blue cohosh, echinacea, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, kava kava, St. John’s wort, valerian, yohimbe, Asian medicines, ayurvedic medicines, or any other botanical. There were zero deaths from creatine, blue-green algae, glucosamine, chondroitin, melatonin, or any homeopathic remedy.

Furthermore, there were zero deaths from any dietary mineral supplement. This means there were no fatalities from calcium, magnesium, chromium, zinc, colloidal silver, selenium, iron, or multimineral supplements. Reported in the “Electrolyte and Mineral” category were two fatalities from the medical use of “Sodium and sodium salts.” These are not dietary supplements.

The US National Poison Data System is “the only comprehensive, near real-time, poisoning surveillance database in the United States. In 2013, poison professionals at the nation’s 55 poison centers managed about 2.2 million human poison exposures, with children younger than 6 accounting for about half of all poison exposure cases.”

No man, woman or child died from any nutritional supplement. Period.

If nutritional supplements are allegedly so “dangerous,” as the FDA, the news media, and even some physicians still claim, then where are the bodies?

 

References:

1. Mowry JB, Spyker DA, Cantilena LR Jr, McMillan N, Ford M. 2013 Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers’ National Poison Data System (NPDS): 31st Annual Report. Clinical Toxicology (2014), 52, p 1032-1283. ISSN: 1556-3650 print / 1556-9519 online. DOI: 10.3109/15563650.2014.987397.

The full text article is available for free download at http://www.aapcc.org/annual-reports/ . Minerals, herbs, amino acids and other supplements are in table 22B, pages 1247-1249.

2. http://www.aapcc.org/press/38/

 

Nutritional Medicine is Orthomolecular Medicine

Orthomolecular medicine uses safe, effective nutritional therapy to fight illness. For more information: http://www.orthomolecular.org

Find a Doctor

To locate an orthomolecular physician near you: http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v06n09.shtml

The peer-reviewed Orthomolecular Medicine News Service is a non-profit and non-commercial informational resource.

Editorial Review Board:

Ian Brighthope, M.D. (Australia)
Ralph K. Campbell, M.D. (USA)
Carolyn Dean, M.D., N.D. (USA)
Damien Downing, M.D. (United Kingdom)
Michael Ellis, M.D. (Australia)
Martin P. Gallagher, M.D., D.C. (USA)
Michael Gonzalez, D.Sc., Ph.D. (Puerto Rico)
William B. Grant, Ph.D. (USA)
Michael Janson, M.D. (USA)
Robert E. Jenkins, D.C. (USA)
Bo H. Jonsson, M.D., Ph.D. (Sweden)
Peter H. Lauda, M.D. (Austria)
Thomas Levy, M.D., J.D. (USA)
Stuart Lindsey, Pharm.D. (USA)
Jorge R. Miranda-Massari, Pharm.D. (Puerto Rico)
Karin Munsterhjelm-Ahumada, M.D. (Finland)
Erik Paterson, M.D. (Canada)
W. Todd Penberthy, Ph.D. (USA)
Gert E. Schuitemaker, Ph.D. (Netherlands)
Robert G. Smith, Ph.D. (USA)
Jagan Nathan Vamanan, M.D. (India)
Atsuo Yanagisawa, M.D., Ph.D. (Japan)

Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D. (USA), Editor and contact person. Email: omns@orthomolecular.org. This is a comments-only address; OMNS is unable to respond to individual reader emails. However, readers are encouraged to write in with their viewpoints. Reader comments become the property of OMNS and may or may not be used for publication.

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OMNS archivehttp://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/index.shtml

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Read this press release on supplement safety on the OMNS website: http://www.orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v11n02.shtml

US National Poison Data System (NPDS): http://www.aapcc.org/data-system/

Annual Reports of the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC): http://www.aapcc.org/annual-reports/

Journal of Clinical Toxicology: http://omicsonline.org/clinical-toxicology.php