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BENEFITS OF GINKGO BILOBA EXTRACT

Dr. Hank Liers PhD gingko biloba extractHealth Products Distributors, Inc. (HPDI) has been carrying high-quality standardized Ginkgo Biloba extract (24/6) for more than 20 years. Ginkgo biloba extract is one of the best-selling herbal supplements in the United States and Europe because of its health benefits. Yet, because of severe price increases in ginkgo extract during the last few years, HPDI’s inventory was depleted. However, the price has now been greatly reduced for high-quality material—and we have inventory back in stock.

Ginkgo Biloba Tree

Ginkgo Biloba Tree

Ginkgo biloba has a long history of use (over thousands of years) in treating memory issues and blood disorders. Today, It is best known as a way to keep memory sharp. Laboratory studies have shown that Ginkgo biloba improves blood circulation by opening up blood vessels and making blood less sticky. Research studies also show that it is a powerful antioxidant.

Based upon these properties, Ginkgo biloba may improve blood vessel and eye health. Research has clearly shown that Ginkgo Biloba helps with dementia and poor circulation in the body. It also protects memory in older adults.

TECHNICAL DATA

Ginkgo leaves contain flavonoids and terpenoids, which are both antioxidants. In your body, harmful free radical substances build up as you age and may contribute to a range of health issues. The antioxidants found in Ginkgo biloba help to neutralize free radicals, and prevent them from damaging DNA and other cellular structures.

Leaves of Ginkgo Biloba Tree

Leaves of Ginkgo Biloba Tree

Chemical constituents: Ginkgo biloba leaf contains a complex mixture of flavonoids including: quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin and other glycosides. It also contains unique diterpenes including ginkgolides A, B, C and J, sesquiterpene bilobalide, and other natural compounds that contribute in a synergistic manner to the beneficial actions of Ginkgo biloba.

Our GINKGO BILOBA extract contains only the highest-quality 50:1 extract of ginkgo biloba standardized to 24% minimum ginkgoflavonglycosides and 6% minimum combined ginkgolides A, B, C, and bilobalide. Each capsule contains 120 mg of the extract and their are 60 capsules in a bottle. Other ingredients include: microcrystalline cellulose, HPMC (vegetarian capsule), and silica. The ginkgolic acid content of the current production run is is 1.36ppm.

Here is the Certificate of Analysis of our current run of Ginkgo Biloba.

Ginkgo Biloba extract

Ginkgo Biloba 120 mg

 

SPECIFIC BENEFITS: GINKGO BILOBA EXTRACT

Reduces Conditions of Dementia: Scientific literature suggests that Ginkgo biloba extract benefits people experiencing cognitive decline, including those with dementia of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Certain studies have found Ginkgo biloba can help improve cognitive performance and memory in both older and younger adults but might be especially useful for age-related mental decline.

Improves Concentration: Research shows that Ginkgo biloba extract can help combat poor concentration, reverse cognitive decline and and heal fatigue. It’s even useful for helping to treat cerebral insufficiency — a condition characterized by chronically low concentration, confusion, decreased physical performance, fatigue, headaches and mood changes.

Helps With ADHD: Some studies using therapies that include Ginkgo biloba have found relief and improved concentration for people with ADHD symptoms. And because it can improve concentration, memory and task performance, it may also reduce symptoms in people with dyslexia. There is also some evidence that ginkgo biloba can help reduce symptoms of autism, making it a potential autism natural treatment.

Helps with Headaches and Migraines: Ginkgo biloba can be an effective way to naturally reduce frequent headaches and the rate and severity of migraines because it reduces pain, increases blood vessel dilation and combats stress that can trigger problems. Headaches may be triggered by stress, fatigue, poor posture, drugs, low blood sugar, hormones, constipation, allergies, eyestrain, and nutritional deficiencies. The amazing benefits that ginkgo has on stress and fatigue is associated with its ability to lessen headache tension.

Helps With Anxiety and Depression: For those with nervousness, depression or mood swings, Ginkgo biloba extract can be helpful. Research suggests Ginkgo biloba benefits the body’s ability to handle stressors and counteracts the effects of high levels of stress hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline.

Ginkgo biloba is considered to be an adaptogenic herb that naturally raises the body’s ability to cope with stress. It can be especially helpful for people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and possibly seasonal depression, panic attacks and social phobias.

Reduces Symptoms of Asthma: Studies have found Ginkgo biloba extract can reduce asthma-related symptoms. Because it lowers inflammation, improves antioxidant activity and positively effects nerve functioning, people have reported less trouble breathing when taking Ginkgo biloba.

Alleviates Symptoms of PMS: Early research has shown positive effects of taking Ginkgo biloba on reducing PMS symptoms, including mood swings, headaches, anxiety, fatigue and muscle pain. It also may have beneficial effects on mood and cognition in postmenopausal women and can help improve similar symptoms.

Helps Maintain Vision and Eye Health: Ginkgo biloba appears to be beneficial for eye health since it improves blood flow to the eyes and prevents free-radical damage that can affect the cornea, macula and retina. It can be especially beneficial for older adults in preserving vision and lowering UV damage or oxidative stress to eye tissue.

Improves Libido: Ginkgo biloba has positive effects on hormonal balance — particularly serotonin levels, blood pressure and circulation. This implies that it may help those dealing with erectile dysfunction and low libido. Ginkgo biloba has the potential to dilate blood vessels and improve blood flow to the genitals, which is important for reproductive health.

Helps Heal Hemorrhoids: Some studies have found that Ginkgo biloba helps those experiencing painful hemorrhoids, that cause swelling, pain and bleeding related to an increase in pressure on the veins of the anus and rectum. Ginkgo biloba may lower pain, improve pain tolerance and reduce inflammation, which may stop bleeding associated with hemorrhoids.

GINKGO BILOBA RESEARCH SUMMARY

Provided below are abstracts from some recent meta-analysis studies that document the effectiveness of Ginkgo biloba on mental health.

(ABSTRACT 1)
Tan MS, Yu JT, Tan CC, Wang HF, Meng XF, Wang C, Jiang T, Zhu XC, Tan L

Efficacy and adverse effects of ginkgo biloba for cognitive impairment and dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

In: J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;43(2):589-603. doi: 10.3233/JAD-14083

Research into Ginkgo biloba has been ongoing for many years, while the benefit and adverse effects of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 for cognitive impairment and dementia has been discussed controversially.
OBJECTIVE: To discuss new evidence on the clinical and adverse effects of standardized Ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 for cognitive impairment and dementia.
METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, and other relevant databases were searched in March 2014 for eligible randomized controlled trials of Ginkgo biloba EGb761 therapy in patients with cognitive impairment and dementia.
RESULTS: Nine trials met our inclusion criteria. Trials were of 22-26 weeks duration and included 2,561 patients in total. In the meta-analysis, the weighted mean differences in change scores for cognition were in favor of EGb761 compared to placebo (-2.86, 95%CI -3.18; -2.54); the standardized mean differences in change scores for activities in daily living (ADLs) were also in favor of EGb761 compared to placebo (-0.36, 95%CI -0.44; -0.28); Peto OR showed a statistically significant difference from placebo for Clinicians’ Global Impression of Change (CGIC) scale (1.88, 95%CI 1.54; 2.29). All these benefits are mainly associated with EGb761 at a dose of 240 mg/day. For subgroup analysis in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms, 240 mg/day EGb761 improved cognitive function, ADLs, CGIC, and also neuropsychiatric symptoms with statistical superiority than for the whole group. For the Alzheimer’s disease subgroup, the main outcomes were almost the same as the whole group of patients with no statistical superiority. Finally, safety data revealed no important safety concerns with EGb761.
CONCLUSIONS: EGb761 at 240 mg/day is able to stabilize or slow decline in cognition, function, behavior, and global change at 22-26 weeks in cognitive impairment and dementia, especially for patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms.

(ABSTRACT 2)
Amieva H1, Meillon C, Helmer C, Barberger-Gateau P, Dartigues JF.

Ginkgo biloba extract and long-term cognitive decline: a 20-year follow-up population-based study.

In: PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e52755. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0052755. Epub 2013 Jan 11

BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have looked at the potential benefits of various nootropic drugs such as Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb761®; Tanakan®) and piracetam (Nootropyl®) on age-related cognitive decline often leading to inconclusive results due to small sample sizes or insufficient follow-up duration. The present study assesses the association between intake of EGb761® and cognitive function of elderly adults over a 20-year period.
METHODS AND FINDINGS: The data were gathered from the prospective community-based cohort study ‘Paquid’. Within the study sample of 3612 non-demented participants aged 65 and over at baseline, three groups were compared: 589 subjects reporting use of EGb761® at at least one of the ten assessment visits, 149 subjects reporting use of piracetam at one of the assessment visits and 2874 subjects not reporting use of either EGb761® or piracetam. Decline on MMSE, verbal fluency and visual memory over the 20-year follow-up was analysed with a multivariate mixed linear effects model. A significant difference in MMSE decline over the 20-year follow-up was observed in the EGb761® and piracetam treatment groups compared to the ‘neither treatment’ group. These effects were in opposite directions: the EGb761® group declined less rapidly than the ‘neither treatment’ group, whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (β = -0.6). Regarding verbal fluency and visual memory, no difference was observed between the EGb761® group and the ‘neither treatment’ group (respectively, β = 0.21 and β = -0.03), whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (respectively, β = -1.40 and β = -0.44). When comparing the EGb761® and piracetam groups directly, a different decline was observed for the three tests (respectively β = -1.07, β = -1.61 and β = -0.41).
CONCLUSION: Cognitive decline in a non-demented elderly population was lower in subjects who reported using EGb761® than in those who did not. This effect may be a specific medication effect of EGb761®, since it was not observed for another nootropic medication, piracetam.

(ABSTRACT 3)
Zhang HF, Huang LB, Zhong YB, Zhou QH, Wang HL, Zheng GQ, Lin Y

[An Overview of Systematic Reviews of Ginkgo biloba Extracts for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia.

In: Front Aging Neurosci. 2016 Dec 6;8:276. doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2016.00276. eCollection 2016

Ginkgo biloba extracts (GBEs) have been recommended to improve cognitive function and to prevent cognitive decline, but earlier evidence was inconclusive. Here, we evaluated all systematic reviews of GBEs for prevention of cognitive decline, and intervention of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. Six databases from their inception to September 2015 were searched. Ten systematic reviews were identified, including reviews about Alzheimer’s disease (n = 3), about vascular dementia (n = 1), about both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia (n = 2), about Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia and mixed dementia (n = 3), and a review about MCI (n = 1). Based on the overview quality assessment questionnaire, eight studies were scored with at least 5 points, while the other two scored 4 points and 3 points, respectively. Medication with GBEs showed improvement in cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and daily activities, and the effect was dose-dependent. Efficacy was convincingly demonstrated only when high daily dose (240 mg) was applied. Compared with placebo, overall adverse events and serious adverse events were at the same level as placebo, with less adverse events in favor of GBE in the subgroup of Alzheimer’s disease patients, and fewer incidences in vertigo, tinnitus, angina pectoris, and headache. In conclusion, there is clear evidence to support the efficacy of GBEs for MCI and dementia, whereas the question on efficacy to prevent cognitive decline is still open. In addition, GBEs seem to be generally safe.

(ABSTRACT 4)
Hashiguchi M, Ohta Y, Shimizu M, Maruyama J, Mochizuki M.

[Meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of Ginkgo biloba extract for the treatment of dementia.In: J Fr Ophtalmol (1988) 11(10):671-4 (Published in French)]

In: J Pharm Health Care Sci. 2015 Apr 10;1:14. doi: 10.1186/s40780-015-0014-7. eCollection 2015.

The benefit of Ginkgo biloba for the treatment of dementia remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ginkgo biloba in patients with dementia in whom administration effects were reported using meta-analysis.
METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane databases, and Ichushi for controlled trials of Ginkgo biloba for the treatment dementia. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were extracted. Meta-analysis results were expressed as standard mean differences (SMDs) in scores of the Syndrome Kurztest (SKT), Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) for cognition efficacy, or odds ratios (ORs) for dropouts and adverse drug reactions.
RESULTS: Thirteen studies using the extract EGb761 met our inclusion criteria, which were duration of 12 to 52 weeks and daily dose of more than 120 mg, and included a total of 2381 patients. Meta-analysis was performed by using 9 of 13 studies, 7 of which used the SKT and 2 ADAS-Cog (dose 120 mg, 26 weeks) scores as efficacy parameters. In meta-analysis of all patients, SMDs (95% confidence interval [CI]) in the change in SKT scores (7 studies) were in favor of Ginkgo biloba over placebo (SMD = -0.90 [-1.46, -0.34]), but 2 studies that used ADAS-Cog did not show a statistically significant difference from placebo for ADAS-Cog (-0.06 [-0.41, 0.30]). For Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) subgroups, SMDs [95% CI] in SKT in the combined AD and VaD subgroup (-1.07 [-1.66, -0.47]) and AD subgroup (-1.36 [-2.27, -0.46]) were in favor of Ginkgo biloba over placebo. In terms of daily dose of Ginkgo biloba in the combined AD and VaD subgroup, SMD in SKT score in 240-mg daily dose groups was significantly greater than with placebo (-0.71 [-1.28, -0.14]). Dropout rates for any reason did not differ between two groups, but dropout rates due to side effects were significantly lower in Ginkgo biloba groups compared with placebo groups (OR = 1.72 [1.06, 2.80]).
CONCLUSIONS: Taking a 240-mg daily dose of Ginkgo biloba extract is effective and safe in the treatment of dementia.

For a more extensive list of Ginkgo Biloba abstracts go here.

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NO DEATHS FROM ANY DIETARY SUPPLEMENT: US POISON DATA SYSTEM

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD dietary supplementFred Liers PhD dietary supplement dshea

The recently published annual report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers indicates no deaths from dietary supplements in 2013. The annual report was published in the journal Clinical Toxicology and was based on information collected by the US National Poison Data System (NPDS).

The report also indicated no deaths from any amino acid product or herbal product.

vitamin dietary supplement safety

No deaths were caused by any dietary supplement in 2013 according to US NPDS data.

The full text of the January 16, 2015 press release obtained from the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service (OMNS) follows. ~

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, January 16, 2015

No Deaths from ANY Dietary Supplement

Zero Fatalities from Minerals, Vitamins, Amino Acids, Herbs, Homeopathic Remedies

by Andrew W. Saul, Editor

(OMNS Jan 16, 2015) There was not even one death caused by any dietary supplement in 2013, according to the most recent information collected by the US National Poison Data System. The new 251-page annual report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers, published in the journal Clinical Toxicology (1), shows no deaths whatsoever from any dietary supplement.

Additionally, there were zero deaths from any amino acid or herbal product. This means no deaths at all from blue cohosh, echinacea, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, kava kava, St. John’s wort, valerian, yohimbe, Asian medicines, ayurvedic medicines, or any other botanical. There were zero deaths from creatine, blue-green algae, glucosamine, chondroitin, melatonin, or any homeopathic remedy.

Furthermore, there were zero deaths from any dietary mineral supplement. This means there were no fatalities from calcium, magnesium, chromium, zinc, colloidal silver, selenium, iron, or multimineral supplements. Reported in the “Electrolyte and Mineral” category were two fatalities from the medical use of “Sodium and sodium salts.” These are not dietary supplements.

The US National Poison Data System is “the only comprehensive, near real-time, poisoning surveillance database in the United States. In 2013, poison professionals at the nation’s 55 poison centers managed about 2.2 million human poison exposures, with children younger than 6 accounting for about half of all poison exposure cases.”

No man, woman or child died from any nutritional supplement. Period.

If nutritional supplements are allegedly so “dangerous,” as the FDA, the news media, and even some physicians still claim, then where are the bodies?

 

References:

1. Mowry JB, Spyker DA, Cantilena LR Jr, McMillan N, Ford M. 2013 Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers’ National Poison Data System (NPDS): 31st Annual Report. Clinical Toxicology (2014), 52, p 1032-1283. ISSN: 1556-3650 print / 1556-9519 online. DOI: 10.3109/15563650.2014.987397.

The full text article is available for free download at http://www.aapcc.org/annual-reports/ . Minerals, herbs, amino acids and other supplements are in table 22B, pages 1247-1249.

2. http://www.aapcc.org/press/38/

 

Nutritional Medicine is Orthomolecular Medicine

Orthomolecular medicine uses safe, effective nutritional therapy to fight illness. For more information: http://www.orthomolecular.org

Find a Doctor

To locate an orthomolecular physician near you: http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v06n09.shtml

The peer-reviewed Orthomolecular Medicine News Service is a non-profit and non-commercial informational resource.

Editorial Review Board:

Ian Brighthope, M.D. (Australia)
Ralph K. Campbell, M.D. (USA)
Carolyn Dean, M.D., N.D. (USA)
Damien Downing, M.D. (United Kingdom)
Michael Ellis, M.D. (Australia)
Martin P. Gallagher, M.D., D.C. (USA)
Michael Gonzalez, D.Sc., Ph.D. (Puerto Rico)
William B. Grant, Ph.D. (USA)
Michael Janson, M.D. (USA)
Robert E. Jenkins, D.C. (USA)
Bo H. Jonsson, M.D., Ph.D. (Sweden)
Peter H. Lauda, M.D. (Austria)
Thomas Levy, M.D., J.D. (USA)
Stuart Lindsey, Pharm.D. (USA)
Jorge R. Miranda-Massari, Pharm.D. (Puerto Rico)
Karin Munsterhjelm-Ahumada, M.D. (Finland)
Erik Paterson, M.D. (Canada)
W. Todd Penberthy, Ph.D. (USA)
Gert E. Schuitemaker, Ph.D. (Netherlands)
Robert G. Smith, Ph.D. (USA)
Jagan Nathan Vamanan, M.D. (India)
Atsuo Yanagisawa, M.D., Ph.D. (Japan)

Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D. (USA), Editor and contact person. Email: omns@orthomolecular.org. This is a comments-only address; OMNS is unable to respond to individual reader emails. However, readers are encouraged to write in with their viewpoints. Reader comments become the property of OMNS and may or may not be used for publication.

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Read this press release on supplement safety on the OMNS website: http://www.orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v11n02.shtml

US National Poison Data System (NPDS): http://www.aapcc.org/data-system/

Annual Reports of the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC): http://www.aapcc.org/annual-reports/

Journal of Clinical Toxicology: http://omicsonline.org/clinical-toxicology.php