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WARRIOR MIST TOPICAL FOR PAIN RELIEF

Fred Liers PhD warrior mist topical pain relieverWarrior Mist™ is the most effective formula for pain relief offered by HPDI. Warrior Mist is an all-natural, fast-acting, topical pain reliever that is effective for many types of pain. I should know. I have used it nearly every day—for years!

Types of pain Warrior Mist is known to stop, reduce, or soothe include: back pain (including sciatica), knee pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, headaches (including migraines), neck pain and tension, stiff and painful (or pulled) muscles, plantar fascitis, arthritis, sports injuries, old injuries, sprains and strains, bruises (including deep bruises), shin splints, tennis elbow, nerve pain, and post surgery pain.

Practicing aikido for years, I have a frequent need for the rapid effects of Warrior Mist. Having used it for regularly for a long time, I appreciate how quickly it relieves pain like joint pain or sprains. It also works spectacularly for bruises, cuts, abrasions, burns, bug bites, and many other applications.

TESTIMONIAL: "This really works. I had tried several other products, including prescription medications, and little success. There was a noticeable difference after my first use of the product." – Amazon customer

Warrior Mist comes in a convenient one-ounce spray bottle. I shake the bottle and then add a few pumps—or as many as I need—to my non-pumping hand and rub onto the affected area. You can also spray it directly onto skin before rubbing it in with a clean hand. If you need more, you can always unscrew the cap and pour directly into your hand or onto skin, but I usually only reserve this action for times when I’m at the end of the bottle and I want to use all the Warrior Mist remaining in the bottle.

The small bottle travels well, and I usually take it with me whenever I travel. I also keep a bottle ready in a small hiking kit that I carry with me on the trail. While I may not always need it, nevertheless it is there. I cannot count how often I used it when I’ve least expected to need it. Sprained ankles or swollen fingers heal a lot faster than you might expect, compared to not having Warrior Mist around. It even works well on things like mosquito bites—and helps repel them.

Warrior Mist can be combined effectively with other natural topical products, especially Ancient Minerals Magnesium Oil (see video). I often mix a little Warrior Mist with Magnesium Oil in my palm. This mix gives me all the benefits of Warrior Mist with the added boost of extra magnesium chloride that speeds healing.

Warrior Mist pain relief formula

WARRIOR MIST BENEFITS

Warrior Mist offers rapid pain relief and many other benefits:

• RAPID, EFFECTIVE PAIN RELIEF – Formulated as a fast-acting pain reliever using only natural ingredients

• LONG LASTING – pain relief last eight hours (or more) per use. This is a natural formula, so you will eventually need to re-apply it. But fewer applications means more time living life pain free.

• SAFE – 100% natural formula. This means that unlike prescription drugs or many over-the-counter medicines, there are no harsh or dangerous side effects.

• RAPID HEALING. Not only effectively relieves pain, but also supports rapid healing at the cellular level. It thereby supports healing at the sources of pain. i.e., helps with the underlying causes of pain.

• REDUCES MUSCLE SORENESS AND TENSION. Another benefit of direct topical application of natural, yet powerful (mostly herbal) ingredients. While this has obvious benefits for athletes, it also helps weekend warriors, or anyone who has muscle soreness due to any reason!

• INCREASES CIRCULATION. Increased circulation is a significant healthy benefit in itself, allowing better oxygenation of tissues, supporting healing, reducing stagnation of blood, and boosting processes of detoxification.

• LESSENS INFLAMMATION. Inflamatory processes can be harmful to the body. Warrior Mist helps reduce inflammation naturally, and thereby lessens free-radical damage from it, for example. This significantly supports your healing process.

• TISSUE REPAIR. When the ingredients in Warrior Mist penetrate tissues, then those tissues can begin the process of healing and repair, and do it faster!

• HEALS SKIN IRRITATIONS. A major added benefit is the healing of “minor” skin irritations, cuts, abrasions, etc. This is because the ingredients in Warrior Mist™ do double duty as superb nutrients for the skin.

• SCAR REDUCTION. Warrior Mist™ can soften scar tissues and stimulate the kind of deep healing that results in smaller scars and improved appearance of scars.

TESTIMONIAL: "Warrior Mist is the only product that I have found which truly relieves the osteoarthritis pain in my knee!! I am amazed by the speed and effectiveness of Warrior Mist. As an older person who has planned and worked to be able to complete my life in my own home, Warrior Mist contributes enormously to my ability to do that! Thank you for this excellent product!" – Amazon customer

 

WHY IS WARRIOR MIST EFFECTIVE?

Warrior Mist™ is a revolutionary skin, muscle, and joint support formula that uses DMSO, olive oil, coconut oil, and water as base (or carrier) ingredients that transdermally transport the other ingredients directly to the site of the problem where they work together harmoniously and effectively.

Functional ingredients carried to the site of pain include: peppermint oil (the primary source of menthol in the product), magnesium chloride, MSM, lemon oil, and lavender oil. Each of the functional ingredients (and their amounts) were carefully selected for their ability to stop pain, to help the body overcome the causes of pain, to promote healing at the local level, or to work synergistically with the other ingredients. Warrior Mist is 100% all-natural and totally safe!

As a topical analgesic, Warrior Mist conforms to the proposed rules set forth in FDA Monograph 348. The label used on the current Warrior Mist (1 oz spray bottle) meets the requirements set forth in this monograph. Even though there are a number of ingredients in Warrior Mist that can potentially provide temporary pain relief, the FDA monograph only recognizes the ingredient menthol, the major ingredient in peppermint oil, as an allowable active ingredient. According to the monograph, we can only mention menthol as the active ingredient and all other ingredients must be labelled as inactive ingredients.

The truth is that all the ingredients (functional and base/carrier ingredients) add up to a synergistic formula that rapidly relieves pain in a single, easy-to-apply topical product. What more could you ask for?

WHAT INGREDIENTS DOES WARRIOR MIST CONTAIN?

COMPOSITION / INGREDIENTS: DMSO (99.999% pure), peppermint oil, organic olive oil, distilled water, MSM, magnesium chloride, lemon oil, lavender oil, and organic coconut oil.

DMSO
Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a by-product of the wood industry, has been in use as a commercial solvent since 1953. Furthermore, in 125 countries throughout the world doctors prescribe it for a variety of issues, including inflammation. DMSO has been used widely as a carrier in topical analgesic formulas. Laboratory studies have shown that DMSO is able to block peripheral nerve C fibers.

Burns, cuts, and sprains have been treated with DMSO. Relief is reported to be almost immediate, lasting up to 6 hours. DMSO reduces inflammation by several mechanisms. It is an antioxidant, a scavenger of the free radicals that gather at the site of injury. Studies have shown DMSO to be one of the safest ingredients known with a toxicity similar to that of water.

DMSO has long been used to promote healing both in animals and humans. Those who have used it for minor cuts and burns report that recovery is speedy. Several studies have documented DMSO use with soft tissue damage, local tissue death, skin ulcers, and burns. Applied topically and repeatedly, DMSO flattens the raised, nodular, lobed liner mass of scar tissue in keloids and acne.

MSM
MSM is a naturally occurring nutrient found in normal human diets. In the body DMSO and MSM, which form each other, are indistinguishable in their biochemical effects. They reach a equilibrium distribution between them that is dependent on the local body chemistry, and is independent of which one you start with. The metabolic enhancement mechanism of MSM and DMSO is that of an exceptionally effective oxygen transport system. This system is made particularly effective by the feature that both DMSO and MSM are highly soluble in both oil and water.

MSM makes cell walls permeable, allowing water and nutrients to freely flow into cells and allowing wastes and toxins to properly flow out. The body uses MSM along with Vitamin C to create new healthy cells, and MSM provides the flexible bond between the cells. Without proper levels of MSM, our bodies are unable to build healthy cells, and this leads to problems such as lost flexibility, scar tissue, wrinkles, varicose veins, hardened arteries, damaged lung tissues, dry cracking skin, digestive disorders, joint problems, and inability to defend against allergic reactions to food, animals and plants.

The applications of MSM include pain control (analgesic), inflammation control, dilation of blood vessels, increased blood flow, reduced muscle spasm, altering the crosslinking process in collagen (e.g., reducing scar tissue,) anti-parasitic effects (particularly against Giardia), and immune normalizing effects. MSM has a unique ability to pass through cellular membranes (including skin).

Peppermint Oil
The primary constituent of peppermint oil is menthol, which causes a physical reaction when inhaled or applied to the skin. Menthol produces an immediate and pronounced sensation of coolness that effects the body quite noticeably, and creates a “warming effect” as blood flows into the area of application.

Peppermint oil can be used externally for providing relief from pain. Peppermint oil increases your immunity. It also improves blood circulation. Additional of the uses of peppermint oil include:acne, asthma, colds, cramps, dermatitis, exhaustion, influenza, headache, insect bites, mental fatigue, migraine, nausea, nerve pain, neuralgia, poor circulation, and respiratory disorders.

Lavender Oil
Lavender oil helps in treating migraines, headaches, anxiety, depression, nervous tension and emotional stress. The refreshing aroma removes nervous exhaustion and restlessness and increases mental activity. Because it induces sleep, it is often recommended for insomnia. Lavender oil is also an excellent remedy for various types of pains including those caused by sore muscles, tense muscles, muscular aches, rheumatism, sprains, backache,and lumbago. A regular massage with lavender oil can provide relief from pain in the joints.

Lavender oil is also good for improving blood circulation in the body. The health benefits of lavender oil for the skin can be attributed to its antiseptic and antifungal properties. It is used to treat various skin conditions, including acne, wrinkles, psoriasis, and other inflammatory conditions. It heals wounds, cuts, burns, and sunburns rapidly because it aids in the formation of scar tissues. It is also effective against insect bites. The oil also repels mosquitoes and moths.

Lemon Oil
Lemon oil is powerfully astringent and antiseptic. Lemon oil is detoxifying and is therefore good for blemishes associated with oily skin. Lemon oil is a powerful antioxidant and is a tonic for supporting the nervous and sympathetic nervous system. It’s been long known that lemon oil is anti-infective, antibacterial (especially with spores), and antiviral. It can function as a disinfectant and exerts vitamin P-like action for improving microcirculation, promotes white blood cell formation, and improves immune function. It has also been widely used in skin care to cleanse skin and reduce wrinkles.

Magnesium Chloride
Magnesium chloride applied to the skin is an effective means for increasing magnesium levels in the body, and is particularly useful for relieving sore muscles and joints, and reducing pain related to functional magnesium deficiency. It is also proven for use in helping to calm “nerves” and reduce systemic bodily stress. Because the magnesium targets muscle tissues, it is thereby especially useful for replenishing depleted soft tissues and helping restore proper function.

Magnesium is necessary for the production of energy in the body. When the body receives adequate amounts of magnesium, it can produce the levels of energy required to sustain the body and enable it to thrive. Magnesium chloride is proven for use in a variety of general applications, including bruises, cramps, muscle tension, and migraine headaches.

Olive Oil
Used as a base and mixed with other essential oils, olive oil makes a wonderful oil for skin health. In fact, it has been touted as one of the oldest healing and beauty techniques. A biblical reference from about 493 BCE documents the daily massage with olive oil and other oils as a part of the beauty regimen.

Coconut Oil
Coconut oil is a superb skin lotion because it both nourishes skin and is naturally anti-bacterial, antiviral, and antifungal due to its high content of medium chain triglycerides

DIRECTIONS: Shake bottle before applying. Wash hands before and after use. Apply in a thin layer to a clean, dry, and lotion-free area needing support. Shave thick hair that may prevent absorption by the skin. Gently massage the area of application to assist absorption. Reapply as needed 3–4 times daily. Contains DMSO, a known solvent. Use on people or pets at your own discretion.

USES: Warrior Mist™ is an all-natural skin, muscle, and joint support formula.

WARNINGS: For external use only. May cause temporary (up to 45 minutes) skin irritation, heating, or flushing upon use. Discontinue use if temporary skin conditions persist. Do not use on wounds or severely damaged skin. Do not bandage tightly. Avoid contact with eyes. Flush eyes with cool water if exposed. Do not use if allergic to any ingredients. Stop use and visit a health care professional if reason for use continues for more than one week. If swallowed get medical help or call a Poison Control Center. Consult a health care professional before use if pregnant.

Warrior Mist topical pain formula

CONCLUSION

Warrior Mist topical formula is highly effective for pain relief. A major advantage is that it is a natural formula (available without a prescription) and can safely be re-applied whenever necessary. Another benefit is that it lacks the side effects common to prescription pain medications.

Try Warrior Mist for yourself. If you’re like me, you will want to keep a bottle or two ready for the aches and pains of daily life. Use it as often as you need it. Be a warrior!

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OMEGA-3 ESSENTIAL FATS REMAIN “ESSENTIAL” – A REBUTTAL FROM OMNS

Fred Liers PhD omega-3 essential fats plus e EFA formulaOmega-3 essential fatty acids (EFA) are critically important for health. That is the reason we at HPDI include them in our foundational supplements system in the form of our Essential Fats Plus E formula. Essential Fats Plus E provides a balanced ratio of 4:1 omega-3 EPA to omega-6 GLA fatty acids proven to optimally support health.

As important as Omega-3 fats are in good health, various studies conclude they are of little value. In order to help clarity the fallacies found in such studies, this month we re-print the recent article “Omega 3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease” from the Orthomolecular News Service (OMNS).

BACKGROUND

Essential fats including Omega-3 and Omega-6 are so important to health that we consider them as foundational or “core” to basic nutrition as multivitamins, antioxidants/vitamin C formulas, and high-RNA superfoods, like Rejuvenate! Plus.

Many of today’s health problems relate to deficiencies in Omega-3 essential fatty acids rather than overabundance of it. It makes sense for everyone to supplement their diets with at least a minimum amount of essential fats. This is addition to consuming foods high in Omega-3 (and Omega-6) essential fats, including leafy greens, nuts, seeds, and seed oils. Also, small amounts of wild-caught fish from clean waters. Preferably these fish would come from low on the food chain, such as sardines, herring, or young mackerel, for example.

In December 2107, my father Hank Liers, PhD, wrote “The Truth about Essential Fatty Acids.” In his article, he delves into detail about why essential fatty acids are critical for health.

The diagram below from Dr. Hank’s article shows in detail the pathways for the production and use of fatty acids in the body. In the figure the metabolic pathways (running left to right) for four fatty acids types are shown (top – Omega-3, second – Omega-6, third – Omega-9, bottom – Omega-7). Notice that only the omega-3 and omega-6 oils are considered to be essential fatty acids because they cannot be made in the body. This means they must come from food.

omega-3 fats omega-6 fats

Furthermore, an additional diagram from Dr. Hank’s article shown below provides details of the omega-6 and omega-3 pathways. Pathway specifics indicate key eicosanoids (series 1 prostaglandins [anti-inflammatory], series 2 prostaglandins [pro-inflammatory], and series 3 prostaglandins [anti-inflammatory]), oil sources, and important nutrient cofactors that are needed for the reactions to take place.

omega-3 fats omega-6 fats

In particular, Dr. Hank discusses how superior benefits to health result from a balanced 4:1 ratio between Omega-3 eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) fatty acids and Omega-6 gamma linoleic acid (GLA).

Below we list some of the functions and benefits obtained when by diet or supplementation the correct ratios and amounts of essential fatty acids are consumed.

• Regulate steroid production and hormone synthesis
• Regulate pressure in the eyes, joints, and blood vessels
• Regulate response to pain, inflammation, and swelling
• Mediate Immune Response
• Regulate bodily secretions and their viscosity
• Dilate or constrict blood vessels
• Regulate smooth muscle and autonomic reflexes
• Are primary constituents of cellular membranes
• Regulate the rate at which cells divide
• Necessary for the transport of oxygen from the red blood cells to tissues
• Necessary for proper kidney function and fluid balance
• Prevent red blood cells from clumping together
• Regulate nerve transmission

Dr. Hank also discusses the fallacy of thinking that supplemental Omega-3 fats alone are sufficient to produce health. That is, despite the relative lack of Omega-3 essential fats and the prevalence of Omega-6 fats in modern diets, it is nevertheless the forms (EPA and GLA)—and the critical 4:1 ratio between them—that makes the difference in how they act synergistically for health. The result of Hank’s scientific understanding of essential fatty acids has resulted in his formulation of a balanced EFA product, Essential Fats Plus E.

Orthomolecular Medicine News Service Article “Omega 3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease”

Regarding the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service article “Omega 3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease” (republished below) rebutting the “Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews” which relies on so-called “Evidence Based Medicine” (EBM) to distort truth on Omega-3 essential fatty acids, the fact that Omega-3 fats are under such false attack represents a huge disservice to the public.

While essential fatty acids may not generate profits for corporations—and in fact may lead to improved health outcomes that threaten the use of chemicals and drugs—essential fats nevertheless remain foundational for health.

Above we have shown the important reasons Omega-3 fats and other essential fatty acids are scientifically termed “essential.” And why people continue taking essential fats, and giving them to their families and children, for supporting health and well-being. Primary among these reasons is that you cannot be healthy without them. Hence, they are essential. Why believe anyone who says otherwise?

The bottom line: Omega-3 essential fatty acids are critical for health. Supplementing the diet with them is a good idea for nearly everyone. This is especially true because typical diets are proven to be most deficient in Omega-3 among essential fats.

Below we re-print in full the recent article “Omega 3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease” from the Orthomolecular News Service (OMNS) for the benefit of our HPDI blog readers. ~

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, Aug 6, 2018

Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease

Commentary by Damien Downing, MBBS, MSB and Robert G. Smith, PhD

The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews has just updated its own review: Omega-3 fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease [1]. Here’s our take on it.

Michael Pollan, the brilliant food writer, reckoned you could sum up what to do about nutrition and diets in 7 words; “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.” That sums up both what’s best for humans and what’s best for the planet.

We reckon you can sum up what’s wrong with evidence-based medicine (EBM) in 10 words; “Evidence is a waste of data; systematic reviews are palimpsests.” You can use that as a knife to quickly dissect this study.

There are many things wrong with this review. Somebody’s PR department has spun the review’s “no clear evidence of benefit” into “evidence of no benefit” – absence of evidence becoming evidence of absence. And clearly the media were entirely happy to take that one and run with it.

Systematic reviews are palimpsests

What’s a palimpsest? Back when things got written on vellum, an animal skin, not on paper, you didn’t throw it away; you recycled it and wrote over the original. It was called a palimpsest.

A systematic review gives an opportunity to write over the conclusions of a whole list of papers with your new version of the truth. You do that by the way that you select and exclude them.

For instance there was a meta-analysis (that’s a systematic review with more numbers) in 2005 that concluded that vitamin E supplements significantly increased the risk of death [2]. The way they did that was to rule out any study with less than 10 deaths – when fewer deaths was exactly the outcome they were supposed to be looking for.

The reason they gave for doing that was “because we anticipated that many small trials did not collect mortality data.” We’re not buying it; they used it as a trick to enable them to get the negative result they wanted – to over-write the findings of a long list of original studies.

And here we have authors doing the very same thing in this omega-3 study – and upping the ante slightly. Now the threshold is 50 deaths. Fewer than that and your study is ruled out of the final, supposedly least biased, analysis . . on the grounds that it’s more biased.

We don’t know how they could keep a straight face while saying (our interpretation); “The studies with fewer deaths showed more benefit from omega-3s, so we excluded them.” At least that’s what happened back in 2004 when the first version of this came out.[3]

But this is the 8th update (we think) and they no longer bother to tell you about what they included or excluded in detail, so we can only assume that if they had changed that exclusion they would have told us.

The weird thing is that they are allowed to do it. Nutrition researcher Dr. Steve Hickey has shown that in systematic reviews there is generally control for bias in the included studies, but none for bias in the actual review and its authors.[4,5]

They found not one example of adequate blinding among 100 Cochrane reviews (like this one); they could all be palimpsests. Do we know that they are fake? No, but it doesn’t matter: what we do know is that we can’t trust them. Nor can we trust this Cochrane review. Things haven’t changed since 2004.

Evidence is a waste of data

Evidence is what lawyers and courts use to find someone Guilty or Not Guilty, and we all know how that can go wrong. It’s a binary system: you’re either one or the other. But at least if you’re on trial all the evidence should be about you and whether you did the crime.

In EBM the evidence is all about populations, not about individuals. When a doctor tells you “There’s a 1 in 3 chance this treatment will work” he is required to base that on big studies, or even systematic reviews. You don’t, and you can’t, know what that means for you because very likely you don’t fit the population profile.

As Steve Hickey (again) said, the statistical fallacy underlying all this states that you have one testicle and one ovary – because that’s the population average! The authors of this study update started off with about 2100 papers that looked relevant. They then excluded 90 per cent of them for various reasons – some of them good reasons, some not.

A smarter way to work would be to data-mine them and look for useful information about sub-groups and sub-effects in all the papers. Is there a particular reason omega-3s might work for you and not for others? Perhaps you can’t stand fish, or are allergic to them, and so are deficient in omega-3s.

But the review system doesn’t allow it, it insists on overall conclusions (about populations), and that’s a colossal waste of data. It also confounds the overall finding of the review – it biases it in fact.

Here’s an example: while most subgroups that made it to the final analysis showed a small reduction in risk from taking omega-3s in one form or another (pills, food, whatever), those who got it from supplemented foods, which we understand means stuff like margarine with added omega-3, showed a 4.3-fold death risk increase!

The problem here is that the effects of omega-3 fatty acids cannot be studied alone as if they were a drug. What counts are all the other components of the diet that affect a person’s health.

Processed foods and drinks that contain many unhealthy ingredients can’t be made healthy by adding small doses of vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids. In fact, many processed foods that contain small doses of vitamins and other essential nutrients are unhealthy because they contain large doses of sugar, salt, and harmful ingredients such as preservatives, dyes, and other non-food items.

Why lipids are so important

Part of the problem is that lipids are truly complicated, and not many people, patients, doctors or even scientists, understand them well. You need a good understanding of lipid metabolism to appreciate the difference in metabolism and impact between alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, in food such as oily fish) and extracted oils such as EPA and DHA that are only found at high levels in omega-3 supplements.

At these levels they are effectively new to nature; nobody, indeed no mammal, was exposed to really high doses of DHA until we invented fish oil supplements [6]. Miss that fact and you miss the difference between having people eat fresh oily fish or just using omega-3 margarine!

We know from a variety of studies that a diet containing generous portions of green leafy and colorful vegetables and fruits, moderate portions of eggs, fish, and meat, and supplements of adequate doses of essential nutrients (vitamins and minerals) is effective at lowering the risk for cardiovascular disease.

Adequate doses of both omega-3 (in flax oil, walnuts, fish) and omega-6 (in seed oils such as canola, soybean, peanut) fatty acids are essential for health. Although essential, omega-6 fatty acids are thought to contribute to inflammation throughout the body whereas omega-3 fatty acids are anti-inflammatory.

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for most body organs including the brain but are found in lower levels than omega-6 fatty acids in most vegetables. Risk for cardiovascular disease can be lowered by adequate doses of vitamins C (3,000-10,000mg/d), D (2,000-10,000 IU/d), E (400-1,200 IU/d), and magnesium (300-600 mg/d) in addition to an excellent diet that includes an adequate dose of omega-3 fatty acids.[7]

(Dr. Damien Downing is a specialist physician practicing in London, and President of the British Society for Ecological Medicine. Robert G. Smith is a physiologist and Research Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School Of Medicine.)

 

References:

1. Abdelhamid, A, Brown TJ, Brainard JS, et al., (2018) Omega 3 fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Cochrane Database of Syst Rev. 7:CD003177. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30019766
http://cochranelibrary-wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD003177.pub3/abstract

2. Miller ER, Pastor-Barriuso R, Dalal D, et al., (2005) Review Meta-Analysis?: High-Dosage Vitamin E Supplementation May Increase. Annals of Internal Medicine, 142(1), pp.37-46. Available at: http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=718049.

3. Hooper L, Thompson RL, Harrison RA, et al.. (2004) Omega 3 fatty acids for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. (4):CD003177. http://cochranelibrary-wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD003177.pub2/abstract

4. Hickey S, Noriega LA. Implications and insights for human adaptive mechatronics from developments in algebraic probability theory, IEEE, UK Workshop on Human Adaptive Mechatronics (HAM), Staffs, 15-16 Jan 2009.

5. Hickey S, Hickey A, Noriega LA, (2013) The failure of evidence-based medicine? Eur J Pers Centered Healthcare 1: 69-79. http://ubplj.org/index.php/ejpch/article/view/636

6. Cortie CH, Else, PL, (2012) Dietary docosahexaenoic acid (22:6) incorporates into cardiolipin at the expense of linoleic acid (18:2): Analysis and potential implications. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 13(11): 15447-15463. http://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/13/11/15447

7. Case HS (2017) Orthomolecular Nutrition for Everyone. Turner Publication Co., Nashville, TN. ISBN-13: 978-1681626574

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THE TRUTH ABOUT ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS

The Truth About Essential Fatty Acids

Dr. Hank Liers, PhD essential fatty acidsMany in the field of nutrition have lost sight of the fact that there are two essential fatty acids needed by the body. Many people recommend omega-3 fatty acids assuming the the body gets sufficient omega-6 from the diet. The truth about essential fatty acids is more complicated. This article will show the more complete and correct picture.

BACKGROUND

Fatty acids are part of the lipids class, widely found in nature, food, and organisms. These fatty acids are a critical constituent of the cell membranes in all of the trillions of cells in the body. They have important biological functions including structural, communication, and metabolic roles, and they represent an important source of energy. Their metabolism produces a huge quantity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The beta-oxidation of the fatty acids is a well-known process, mostly used by the heart and the muscular tissue to obtain energy.

Figure 1 below shows a schematic diagram of what a fatty acid looks like. One end of the structure in all cases has a carboxylic acid group (COOH) and the other end in all cases has a methyl group (CH3). Saturated fats have single bonds (-) between all carbon atoms (C), but unsaturated fats have a number of double bonds (=) between some of the carbon atoms.


essential fatty acids

Figure 1 – Basic diagram of fatty acids structure

The human body can synthesize many of these fatty acids, except the essential fatty acids (PUFAs) linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). These two are generally found in various vegetable oils, but their important metabolites are found mainly in special vegetable oils such as borage oil and in fish oils. Linoleic acid is the most abundant fatty acid in nature, and it is the precursor of other omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are synthesized from alpha-linolenic acid.

Once ingested, short-chain PUFAs are converted to long-chain fatty acids. These are critical for mammalian cells in order to perform various biological functions, such as sustaining the structural integrity of cellular membranes and serving as signaling molecules. They are highly enriched in brain tissues, where they participate in the development and maintenance of the central nervous system during both embryonic and adult stages.

Polyunsaturated fatty acids have been extensively researched. They include the essential fatty acids linoleic acid (an omega-6) and alpha linolenic acid (an omega-3). Omega-3s are not abundant in our food chain. There is none in corn oil and very little in soy oil, the two most widely used food oils. Therefore, nearly all the early research with polyunsaturated oils utilized omega-6 fatty acids, predominantly as linoleic acid.

Fish oils were neglected out of ignorance or because the investigators chose to pass over these cholesterol-containing oils. Concern eventually developed over the close association between increasing incidence of mammary tumors and high intake of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. After some years, researchers finally turned their investigations to the interrelationship between dietary omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids.

FATTY ACID METABOLIC PATHWAYS

The following diagram shows in detail the pathways for the production and use of fatty acids in the body. In the figure the metabolic pathways (running left to right) for four fatty acids types are shown (top – Omega-3, second – Omega-6, third – Omega-9, bottom – Omega-7). Notice that only the omega-3 and omega-6 oils are considered to be essential fatty acids because they cannot be made in the body. This means they must come from food.

essential fatty acids

Figure 2 – fatty acid metabolism pathways in the body

The diagram shows a series of enzyme induced reactions that either add a double bond or two additional carbon/hydrogen pairs to the fatty acid. The enzymes that make this happen are called desaturase and elongase. The desaturase enzymes are given a number for the carbon number (that the enzyme is working on) from the methyl end of the fat. These same enzymes work on all of the fatty acid types. For example, Delta 6 desaturase causes an additional double bond to be inserted into both alpha-linolenic (omega-3) and linoleic acid (omega-6) (as well as oleic acid and palmitoleic acids).

In this way, the body is able to produce a wide variety of fatty acids that have their own unique effects on biochemistry. Some of these are more important than others. In particular, the omega-3 essential fatty acid eicosapentanoic acid (EPA), the omega-6 essential fatty acid dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA), and the omega-6 essential fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA) are precursors for a class of chemicals called eicosanoids/prostaglandins that have far reaching affects on key body functions.

EICOSANOIDS/PROSTAGLANDINS

Eicosanoids are prostaglandins that affect many aspects of health both positively and, in some cases, negatively. All known eicosanoids and prostaglandins are formed from the essential fatty acids linoleic acid (omega-6, or n-6), alpha linolenic acid (omega-3, or n-3), their “enhanced” derivatives, and from the omega-3 fatty acids in fish oils.

Prostaglandins are short-lived highly active, hormone-like chemicals that are found in every cell of the body. They are regulators of cell activity and essential for maintaining health. Each cell type or organ produces its own form of prostaglandin to carry out its functions. There are three types of prostaglandins: PG1, PG2, and PG3.

Series 1 Prostaglandins (PG1), derived from gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), the active component of borage oil, has many beneficial effects: It makes platelets less sticky, lowers blood pressure by relaxing smooth muscles in the walls of arteries, increases loss of sodium and water, decreases inflammation and enhances immunity.

Series 2 Prostaglandins (PG2), also derived from GLA, is used in “fight or flight” (stress) situations, – the fight against danger, or the flight from it. In modern lifestyles which are high in stress but low in physical activity, continuous production of Series Two Prostaglandins results in sticky platelets, high blood pressure, increased water and sodium retention, increased inflammation and decreased immune system capabilities.

Series 3 Prostaglandins (PG3), derived from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), the active component of fish oil, has beneficial effects. They block the detrimental effect of the Series 2 Prostaglandins, preventing them from being made in the body. As a result the platelets are less sticky, blood pressure is lower because the muscles in the walls of our arteries remain relaxed, loss of sodium and water by the kidneys takes place more effectively, inflammation response is decreased, and immune function is efficient.

It is now known that the ratios of these dietary fatty acids are very important. Consumption of linoleic acid leads to production of the enhanced fatty acid, arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Prostaglandins based on arachidonic acid exacerbate stress and inflammatory states, and suppress immunoprotective functions (i.e. resistance to disease). Too much linolenic acid and other omega-3s may cause excessive bleeding during injury, surgery, or childbirth. Large amounts of any of these unsaturated fatty acids in the diet without a compensatory increase in antioxidant nutrients (especially Vitamin E), can speed oxidative damage to tissues, resulting in accelerated aging while increasing the risk of degenerative diseases.

Yet, a balanced ratio of both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the diet offers very positive health benefits. When omega-3 fatty acids predominate, the body will produce less arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Immunity improves and inflammation subsides.

Essential Fats

Unfortunately, our Western diet has been almost devoid of omega-3 fatty acids. Creating the optimum intake of omega 3-to-omega 6 unsaturated fatty acids has become, therefore, an issue of prime importance for anyone concerned with health. We need to evaluate carefully the amounts of linoleic acid (n-6) we consume relative to our intake of alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) and fish oils (EPA:20:5n-3 and DHA:22:6n-3).

ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS – PATHWAYS

The diagram in Figure 3 shows details of the omega-6 and omega-3 pathways. Pathway specifics indicate key eicosanoids (series 1 prostaglandins, series 2 prostaglandins, and series 3 prostaglandins), oil sources, and important nutrient cofactors that are needed for the reactions to take place.

essential fatty acids

Figure 3 – Essential Fatty Acids – pathways in the body

The information is this diagram gives the clues we need in order to provide optimal types and amounts of omega-6 and omega-3. For example, I have chosen for my essential fatty acid product cold pressed borage oil as the best natural source of gamma linoleic acid (GLA). It contains 20% by weight — the highest amount found in natural oils.

RESEARCH ON ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS

Work by Chapkin et. al. (see references 1–4 below) has identified the potent synergistic relationship between GLA, an omega-6 fatty acid, and the well-known omega-3 fatty acids. Chapkin has shown that, rather than simply the quantity of dietary omega-3s, it is the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids that is important in achieving full cardiovascular health and inflammatory control.

Furthermore, Chapkin has identified the ideal ratio. His published work deals with the importance of mixed diets supplying both linoleic and linolenic acids. To underscore the importance of these two fatty acids, refined oil supplements rich in enhanced forms were used. “Enhanced forms” are fatty acids derived from the original. They are one or more steps closer to the actual eicosanoid. In the human body, alpha linolenic acid (18:3n-3) is eventually converted to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and linoleic acid (18:2n-6) is converted to gamma-linolenic (GLA, 18:3n-6) as its first enhanced form. Both enhanced fatty acids are precursors to eicosanoids.

In Chapkin’s research, superior health benefits were delivered by the mixed diet that supplied the eicosanoid precursors in a specific ratio. The balanced ratio of enhanced Omega-6 (GLA)-to-Omega-3 (EPA) fatty acids was 1:4.

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SCIENCE

Based upon the science discussed above, I developed a product with the correct Omega-6 (GLA)-to-Omega-3 (EPA) ratio and with proper amounts. It is available to you as Hank & Brians Essential Fats Plus E from Health Products Distributors, Inc. (HPDI).

Essential Fats Plus E

ESSENTIAL FATS PLUS E IS A HIGHLY ADVANCED ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS SUPPLEMENT
OFFERING SPECIAL BENEFITS:

  1. UNIQUE COMBINATION — Essential Fats (EPA, DHA, GLA) plus Vitamin E. This unique formula offers more than one type of Vitamin E (not just d-alpha-tocopherol) and balanced essential fats.
  2. BALANCED ESSENTIAL FATS— Many EFA supplements contain only omega-3s, but for optimal function the body requires a balance of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fats. In addition, our special formula provides a 4-to-1 ratio of EPA to GLA in order to achieve a balance you need for optimal health.
  3. FULL-SPECTRUM VITAMIN E — Tocotrienols and tocopherols in this formula are natural vitamin E substances derived from oryza rice bran oil and protect polyunsatured EFAs against free-radical damage both in the capsule and in your body. Many Vitamin E supplements contain only d-alpha tocopherol, which is only a single component of the full-spectrum Vitamin E in this formula.
  4. ULTRAPURE — Molecularly distilled oils of extremely high-purity containing no PCBs, heavy metals, or oxidized contaminants. Free of excipients, additives, and common food allergens!

COMPOSITION: Six softgel capsules provides the following percentages of the Daily Value.

NUTRIENT AMOUNT % Daily Value†
EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid 20:5 omega 3)
(from 2,000 mg of purified fish oils)
360 mg *
DHA (docosahexaenoic Acid 22:6 omega 3)
(from 2,000 mg of purified fish oils)
240 mg *
GLA (Gamma Linolenic Acid 18:3 omega 6)
(from 450 mg of cold pressed borage seed oil)
90 mg *
Vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol) (from 180 mg of Oryza rice bran oil) 24 IU 81%
Mixed Tocotrienols (d-gamma, d-alpha, and d-delta)
(from 180 mg of Oryza rice bran oil)
28.8 mg *

* No established Daily Value
† Daily Values based on a 2,000 calorie diet

IMPORTANT FUNCTIONS OF ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS

Below we provide some of the functions and benefits obtained when by diet or supplementation the correct ratios and amounts of essential fatty acids are consumed.

• Regulate steroid production and hormone synthesis
• Regulate pressure in the eyes, joints, and blood vessels
• Regulate response to pain, inflammation, and swelling
• Mediate Immune Response
• Regulate bodily secretions and their viscosity
• Dilate or constrict blood vessels
• Regulate smooth muscle and autonomic reflexes
• Are primary constituents of cellular membranes
• Regulate the rate at which cells divide
• Necessary for the transport of oxygen from the red blood cells to tissues
• Necessary for proper kidney function and fluid balance
• Prevent red blood cells from clumping together
• Regulate nerve transmission

GENETIC TESTING AND ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS

Please note that genetic testing for a wide range of genes and the enzymes they produce has indicated that essential fatty acids can be an important factor in helping the body overcome a variety negative gene variations. These negative gene variations include genes that relate to: 1) Inflammatory Response, 2) Exercise Performance, 3) Exercise Recovery, 4) Cardiovascular Fitness, 5) Body Composition, and 6) VO2 Max, Aerobic Capacity.

We will discuss this more deeply in a future blog article.

CONCLUSION

The body is best protected from a range of health issues when we supply a mixed diet of both omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids. Studies show that we do not need to consume large amounts of fatty acids if the ratio is correct. These findings indicate that, for a typical human body, amounts of 90 mg GLA (18:3n-6) to 360 mg EPA (20:5n-3) taken daily will provide for the optimum production of the three major prostaglandins. These amounts are found in Hank & Brians Essential Fats Plus E.

REFERENCES

The following includes abstracts of Chapkin’s published research on essential fatty acids.

REFERENCE 1

Chapkin RS Somers SD Erickson KL

Dietary manipulation of macrophage phospholipid classes: selective increase of dihomogammalinolenic acid.

In: Lipids (1988 Aug) 23(8):766-70

Because alterations in the dietary content of fatty acids are an important method for modulating macrophage eicosanoid production, we have quantitated the levels of n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in peritoneal macrophage individual phospholipids from mice fed diets (3 wk) with either safflower oil (SAF), predominantly containing 18:2n-6, borage, (BOR) containing 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-6, fish (MFO) containing 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3, and borage/fish mixture (MIX) containing 18:2n-6, 18:3n-6, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3. Dietary n-3 fatty acids were readily incorporated into macrophage phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol (PI). The increase in n-3 fatty acid levels was accompanied by a decrease in the absolute levels of 18:2n-6, 20:4n-6 and 22:4n-6 in PC, PE and PS. Interestingly, PI 20:4n-6 levels were not significantly lowered (P greater than 0.05) in MIX and MFO macrophages relative to SAF and BOR. These data demonstrate the unique ability of this phospholipid to selectively maintain its 20:4n-6 levels. In BOR and MIX animals, 20:3n-6 levels were significantly increased (P less than 0.05) in all phospholipids relative to SAF and MFO. The combination of borage and fish oils (MIX diet) produced the highest 20:3n-6/20:4n-6 ratio in all phospholipids. These data show that the macrophage eicosanoid precursor levels of 20:3n-6, 20:4n-6 and n-3 acids can be selectively manipulated through the use of specific dietary regimens. This is noteworthy because an increase in phospholipid levels of 20:3n-6 and 20:5n-3, while concomitantly reducing 20:4n-6, may have therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory disorders.

Institutional address: Department of Human Anatomy School of Medicine University of California Davis 95616.

 

REFERENCE 2

Chapkin RS Carmichael SL

Effects of dietary n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids on macrophage phospholipid classes and subclasses.

In: Lipids (1990 Dec) 25(12):827-34

This study examined the effects of n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid alimentation on murine peritoneal macrophage phospholipids. Mice were fed complete diets supplemented with either corn oil predominantly containing 18:2n-6, borage oil containing 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-6, fish/corn oil mixture containing 18:2n-6, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3, or fish/borage oil mixture containing 18:2n-6, 18:3n-6, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3. After two weeks, the fatty acid levels of glycerophosphoserines (GPS), glycerophosphoinositols (GPI), sphingomyelin (SPH), and of the glycerophosphocholine (GPC) and glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE) phospholipid subclasses were determined. We found that mouse peritoneal macrophage GPC contain primarily 1-O-alkyl-2-acyl (range for the dietary groups, 24.6-30.5 mol %) and 1,2-diacyl (63.2-67.2 mol %), and that GPE contains 1-O- alk-1′-enyl-2-acyl (40.9-47.4 mol %) and 1,2-diacyl (44.2-51.2 mol %) subclasses. In general, fish oil feeding increased macrophage 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 levels while simultaneously reducing 20:4n-6 in GPS, GPI, GPE and GPC subclasses except for 1-O-alk-1′-enyl-2-acyl GPC. Administration of 18:3n-6 rich diets (borage and fish/borage mixture) resulted in the accumulation of 20:3n-6 (2-carbon elongation product of 18:3n-6) in most phospholipids. In general, the novel combination of dietary 18:3n-6 and n-3 PUFA produced the highest 20:3n-6/20:4n-6 phospholipid fatty acid ratios. This study demonstrates that marked differences in the responses of macrophage phospholipid classes and subclasses exist following dietary manipulation.

 

REFERENCE 3

Fan YY Chapkin RS

Mouse peritoneal macrophage prostaglandin E1 synthesis is altered by dietary gamma-linolenic acid.

In: J Nutr (1992 Aug) 122(8):1600-6

The ability of dietary gamma-linolenic acid [18:3(n-6)] to modulate prostaglandin biosynthesis in mouse resident peritoneal macrophages was determined. Mice were fed diets containing corn oil, borage oil or evening primrose oil or a mixture of borage and fish oils. After 2 wk, resident peritoneal macrophages were isolated and stimulated with unopsonized zymosan to induce prostaglandin synthesis. Borage oil, primrose oil and fish-borage oil mixture dietary groups (containing 25.6, 11.9 and 19.5 g gamma-linolenic acid/100 g fatty acids, respectively) had significantly (P less than 0.05) enhanced prostaglandin E1 synthesis (39.7, 29.4 and 73.0 nmol prostaglandin E1/mg protein, respectively) compared with corn oil-fed (containing less than 0.1 g gamma-linolenic acid/100 g fatty acids) animals, which synthesized less than 0.1 nmol prostaglandin E1/mg protein. Borage oil- and fish-borage oil mixture-fed mice had the highest biosynthetic ratio of prostaglandin E1/prostaglandin E2 (E1/E2 approximately 0.2). Macrophages from borage oil-fed mice synthesized the lowest amount of prostacyclin (198.7 nmol 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha/mg protein) compared with corn oil-, primrose oil- and fish- borage oil mixture-fed mice (379.7, 764.8 and 384.2 nmol 6-keto- prostaglandin F1 alpha/mg protein, respectively). In addition, borage oil-, primrose oil- and fish-borage oil mixture-fed mice had significantly (P less than 0.05) higher levels of dihomo-gamma- linolenic acid [20:3(n-6)] in membrane phospholipids (5.5, 3.5 and 5.7 mol/100 mol, respectively) relative to corn oil-fed mice (2.0 mol/100 mol).

 

REFERENCE 4

Fan YY Chapkin RS Ramos KS

Dietary lipid source alters murine macrophage/vascular smooth muscle cell interactions in vitro.

In: J Nutr (1996 Sep) 126(9):2083-8

This study was conducted to compare the impact of dietary lipids on the ability of macrophages to modulate vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) DNA synthesis in vitro. C57BL/6 female mice were fed six different diets (6 mice/diet) containing 10% fat from corn oil (CO), borage oil (BO), primrose oil (PO), fish-corn oil mix (FC, 9:1, w/w), fish-borage oil mix (FB, 1:3, w/w), or fish-primrose oil mix (FP, 1:3, w/w) for 2 wk. Peritoneal macrophages were isolated from these mice, stimulated with zymosan or vehicle, and subsequently co-cultured with naive mouse aortic SMC in the presence of 3H-thymidine to measure SMC DNA synthesis. In this co-culture system, macrophages were seeded on 25-mm culture inserts (upper chamber) and SMC were seeded on 35-mm culture dishes (lower chamber). The two cell types were separated by a semipermeable membrane with a 30-kD cut-off. When quiescent SMC were co-cultured with macrophages, only the PO and FP diet groups had significantly (P < 0.05) lower SMC DNA synthesis compared with the control CO group whose diet contained no gamma- linolenic acid (GLA) or (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). In contrast, when cycling SMC were co-cultured with diet-modulated macrophages, all dietary groups except for those fed FC had significantly lower (P < 0.05) SMC DNA synthesis relative to the CO group. Although the level of GLA in PO and BO diets was different (11.5 and 22.3 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively), these treatments exerted comparable inhibitory effects on SMC DNA synthesis. The FP treatment consistently exhibited the lowest SMC DNA synthetic profile among the six dietary groups irrespective of SMC growth conditions. These data suggest that BO and PO alone or in combination with fish oil influence macrophage/smooth muscle cell interactions in a manner consistent with favorable modulation of the atherogenic process.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

BOOKS

  1. Enig, Mary G. Know Your Fats: The Complete Primer for Understanding the Nutrition of Fats, Oils, and Cholesterol. Bethesda Press, 2000.
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Allergies and Asthma: Supplements and Activities Schedule

Fred Liers PhD allergies asthmaAllergies and asthma are create misery for many people, especially in the spring when seasonal allergies return due to particulates from plants, including pollens.

Yet, seasonal allergic symptoms (e.g., itchy eyes, runny nose) and asthmatic symptoms go far beyond the plant pollens of spring. In fact, allergies and asthma are frequently associated with exposures to certain foods and food additives, molds, animal dander, chemicals, and various environmental exposures.

Fortunately for many sufferers, there are many simple, natural, and alternative means available to help support, alleviate, and in some cases virtually eliminate, the symptoms associated with allergies and asthma.

SOLUTIONS

The best solution, according to those who are familiar with the problem, is to 1) avoid the irritating substances completely, 2) reduce as many immunological challenges as possible, 3) take nutritional supplements that help strengthen the body, 4) detoxify, and 5) make certain lifestyle changes with respect to environmental exposures, diet, exercise, stress, relaxation, etc.

In addition, boosting overall health using protocols from the HPDI Master Rejuvenation Program will help strengthen the body for greater general health, and thereby positively affect how the body deals with conditions such as allergies and asthma.

DIET

Beyond avoidance of known plants, substances, and other environmental exposures, your diet can play an important role in supporting health when dealing with allergy and asthma. That is, allergies and asthma can be exacerbated by allergic reactions to the foods you eat, and by adverse effects of foods to which you may not be sensitized. Be observant to correlations between your symptoms and the foods eat.

Certain foods trigger allergies, so especially avoid foods you know are problematic for you. If you suspect you are allergic to a certain food, then eliminating it for a while (a week or longer) and then reintroducing it into your diet can provide proof as to whether or not the food really is a problem for you.

Allergies are inflammatory responses. Diet can promote inflammation in the body or relieve it. Inflammation in the body tends to worsen allergies. Over-consuming red meats, for example, can promote inflammation (fish is a better option). In this regard, is very important to obtain a proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids. Consuming the proper ratio of these fats can help regulate inflammation in the body. HPDI offers several essential fatty acid formulas, including Omega Plus and Essential Fats Plus E.

It is also helpful to maintain an alkaline state in the body, so be sure to include many alkalline-forming foods (e.g., greens, non-starchy vegetables and fruits) in your diet. Try eating Hank’s Vegetable Soup several times a week.

Consume a diet that is relatively low in fat and high in fiber containing foods such as organic vegetables, fruits, whole grains (e.g., brown rice, millet, and quinoa), beans, nuts and seeds (sunflower, chia, flax, pumpkin, almond, walnut and sesame in small amounts (one or two ounces) are good).

ADDITIONAL DIETARY TIPS

Avoid foods with artificial ingredients (including preservatives and colorings), as well as processed or refined foods (e.g., white breads and pasta).

Try to consume only organic foods whenever possible. Avoid genetically modified foods (GMOs). These have been implicated in the development of allergies and other health conditions.

Generally avoid dairy products when dealing with allergies and asthma. These can produce excess mucus and be acid-forming in the body.

Try not to eat the same thing every day. An elimination or rotation diet may be useful whereby you give your body a break from consuming the same foods.

Allergy and asthma can be exacerbated by imbalances in intestinal flora or lack of beneficial bacteria. Poor intestinal health can lead to yeast overgrowth and/or “leaky gut” syndrome. You may need to follow an anti-candida program if you have been on steroids or antibiotics for a long time. HPDI’s offers effective probiotics (e.g., Prescript-Assist®) and a unique Intestinal Rejuvenation Formula for individuals who seek to cleanse and purify their intestinal tract and rebuild gut populations of beneficial bacteria.

NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS

HPDI advises all individuals to take four basic foundational supplements for health: 1) High-potency multivitamin (like Hank & Brian’s Mighty Multi-Vite!™), 2) Antioxidant / Vitamin C formula (like Ultimate Protector™), 3) Essential Fats, and 4) High-RNA Rejuvenate!™ superfoods, such as Rejuvenate!™ Berries & Herbs.

The four foundational formulas help establish a base of nutrients that support a state of good health. General good health is important not only to help the body deal with existing allergies or asthma, but also to help avert the development of new allergies or triggers for asthma.

Other important formulas include Allergy Support Plus, NAC, and Pantethine. In particular, Allergy Support Plus provides excellent support for allergies by very effectively reducing inflammation in the body. In fact, many users report their symptoms disappear or are greatly reduced. Read more about Allergy Support Plus here.

The Asthma and Allergy supplement schedule (below) provides an excellent starting point and the following paragraphs make some other suggestions that may be helpful to you. These suggestions do not necessarily represent a comprehensive program for regaining your health.

Description AM Noon PM Bed Notes
PRO-C™ and/or Ultimate Protector 2 caps 2 caps 2 caps 1 cap Take with meals and  one before bed.
Rejuvenate Berries & Herbs 1 scoop 1 scoop Take between meals — as a snack
Multi Two or Mighty Multi-vite 1 tab or 2 caps 1 tab or 2 caps Take with meals.
Allergy Support Plus 1 cap 1 cap 1 cap Take 30 minutes before or 2 hours after meals.
Buffered Vitamin C, Tablets — 1,000 mg (1 gm) or Powder (1/4 tsp = 1 gm) 1 gm 1 gm 1 gm 1 gm Best with meals, but other times are okay. Start with 1 gram once per day and add another gram every few days until you are taking 4 grams per day.
Essential Fats plus E 2 caps 1 cap Take with meals.
Pantethine Plus 1 tab 1 tab Take with meals.
NAC — 500 mg 1 cap 1 cap 1 cap Take 30 minutes before or 2 hours after meals. May take up to 3000 mg per day if needed.
Complete E — Vitamin E 1 cap 1 cap Take with meals.
Ancient Minerals Magnesium Oil or Flakes 15 sprays 15 sprays bath Spray on your chest/lung area. Take a bath with 2–3 cups of flakes and 1–2 cups baking soda.

 TABLE 1. Allergy and Asthma Suggested Supplement Schedule. Adjust dosages and timing as needed.

ADDITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS FOR ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA

Additional nutrients that may be helpful include Selenium (200 mcg as l-selenomethionine), Echinacea (as drops or capsules), Quercetin (1500–3000 mg daily), Myo-Mag (1–2 caps 3 times per day), Vitamin B12 as methylcobalamin (5 mg per day sublingually), progesterone cream for women (1/2 tsp twice daily for the first month and then aligned to your menstrual cycle thereafter), Visual Ocuity for irritated eyes, Pure Cordyceps Capsules (4–6 caps daily), and Ubiquinol (50 mg 2–3 times per day). Certain teas and herbs can be helpful, but need to be used properly (e.g., ephedra, licorice, lobelia, skunk cabbage, angelica, and capsicum) because long-term usage may cause loss of effectiveness and possible side effects.

 LIFESTYLE MODIFICATIONS

It is important to make certain lifestyle changes that allow you to avoid the exposures that can cause you to feel ill.  You may need to use natural materials (paints, flooring, sealants, bedding, etc.). Cooking and drinking water and maybe even bathing/cleaning water needs to be purified. Chlorine itself can induce or exacerbate allergies and asthma.  Clothing, sheets/blankets, towels, soaps, detergents, makeup, shampoos, etc., ideally should be made from natural and organic materials.

It is best not to have carpeting in the home because not only do they give off toxic chemicals (e.g., formaldehyde), but also collect of a variety of substances (dust, mold, mites, dirt, etc.) that can trigger your allergies or asthma. Prefinished hardwood floors and ceramic tile are the best alternatives. Molds are particularly bad offenders and extra care should be taken to eliminate exposure to them (use dehumidifiers, zepherin chloride (17% diluted to 1%), grapefruit seed extract (may be diluted to one part in 50,000), and low level ozone (0.01–0.05 PPM). If you must use floor coverings, then use natural fiber rugs (e.g., made from wool or plant fibers).

The use of solvents, petrochemical cleaners, pesticides, strong detergents, and other strong chemicals needs to be avoided (whereas baking soda, vinegar, lemon juice, and some natural cleaners are okay). The use of an air purifer may be extremely helpful to you by eliminating indoor chemicals and molds. Consider consulting a good natural home book, such as Debra Lynn Dadd’s Home Safe Home, which is an excellent resource for locating safe materials.

RELAXATION

Relaxation exercises (including progressive relaxation, visualization, abdominal breathing, and autogenics) are key to becoming well again. We recommend taking biofeedback training from an expert in your area. Stress reduction methods should be practiced daily. These might include yoga, meditation, breathing exercises, qigong, peaceful music, or prayer. There are several excellent books about the connection between the mind and the health of the body, including Minding the Body, Mending the Mind. Any stresses such as cold air or drinks, emotional upset, anger, fear, etc. can induce asthma.

EXERCISE

Try to include a reasonable amount of exercise that is appropriate for you on a daily basis. Yet, remember that overtaxing your body may lead to an overproduction of adrenalin, which can worsen or increase asthma.

Women sometimes find a correlation between their menstrual cycles and asthma/allergy. Keeping a diary for several months can help determine whether or not there is a correlation for you. An imbalance between estrogen and progesterone can cause menstrually correlated asthma. In this respect, progesterone cream can help.

CONCLUSION

Allergies and asthma can be major problems for individuals contributing to discomfort, suffering, and in some cases incapacitation. Through a combination of avoidance, dietary adjustments, lifestyle modifications, and nutritional supplements, the worst symptoms of allergies and asthma can be reduced or eliminated.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

HPDI Master Rejuvenation Program

Allergy Support Plus